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UT Marketing Classical Conditioning Ads Research Paper

UT Marketing Classical Conditioning Ads Research Paper.

I’m working on a marketing report and need a sample draft to help me study.

Objective:The objective of this assignment is to apply your knowledge of classical conditioning and memory in creating brand communication.Instructions:Use your knowledge of Classical Conditioning and create an advertisement idea that applies classical conditioning, on a product of your choice.Instructions:Choose any product category.Give it a new brand name, and justify your choice in light of your understanding of memory and recall.Create an IDEA for a TV ad that applies Classical Conditioning to associate your new brand with a CR.It is NOT MANDATORY to create the actual advertisement; just an ad idea.Deliverables:A 3-5 pages report (excluding the cover page), double spaced, font 12, Times New Romans.Report Format:Introduction: tell us about your product category and your new brand name. Don’t forget to justify your choice of brand name.Ad Idea: tell us a summary of your ad idea.Analysis: make sure you address the following questions in your analysis:What is the desired association and why is it suitable for your brand?What is the UCS, UCR, CS and CRHow does the ad execution successfully applies classical conditioning?How will you encourage the association to stick and avoid extinctionHow will you avoid stimulus generalization or encourage stimulus discrimination?Bonus: submit a storyboard for your TV ad (1%)Please make sure you use headings and subheadings where relevant.
UT Marketing Classical Conditioning Ads Research Paper

St Thomas University Advance Pharmacology Discussion & Replies

St Thomas University Advance Pharmacology Discussion & Replies.

Advance Pharmacology.Discussion 6 and Two Response to Peers J.R. is a 36-year-old white, middle-class woman who has been sexually active with one partner for the past 2 years. She and her partner have no history of STIs, but her partner has a history of fever blisters. She reports genital pain, genital vesicles and ulcers, and fever and malaise for the last 3 days. Examination reveals adenopathy and vaginal and cervical lesions. What drug therapy would you prescribe? Why? What are the parameters for monitoring the success of the therapy? Discuss specific education for J.R. based on the diagnosis and prescribed therapy. Submission Instructions: Your initial post should be at least 500 words, formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 2 academic sources. Bibliophraphy used should be 2016-2021 You should respond to at least two of your peers by extending, refuting/correcting, or adding additional nuance to their posts. Your reply posts should have 200 -250 word with Bibliophraphy used should from 2016-2021. All replies must be constructive and use literature where possible.
St Thomas University Advance Pharmacology Discussion & Replies

Professional Presence Paper

professional essay writers Professional Presence Paper.

Assignment InstructionsPart 1Search using individual internet research and write a report that investigates a cultural group in your desired field. Describe what the group is like in your own words. (My field is accounting)Part 2Select and interview a professional person in your field of interest. Ask questions about this person’s group that will allow you to gain insights into aspects of the culture that he/she is a member of. Integrate the insights gained from the interview responses and your impressions into your written report.Assignment FormatCover page that includes your name, course and section number, date, and the Assignment title.Five pages clearly typewritten in college-level American English text (3 pages background text, 2 pages describing what you learned from the interview).One reference page listing sources you discovered in your background research and used to support your descriptive writing in Part 1 (use APA citation).Attach your interview questions and notes as an appendix.
Professional Presence Paper

Importance of Natural Product Synthesis

History of medicine dates back practically to the existence of human civilization. Historically, the majority of new drugs have been generated from natural products and from compounds derived from natural products. Natural products, including plants, animals and minerals have always been a source of therapeutic agents for many years. Natural products sometimes exhibit pharmacological or biological property that can be of therapeutic benefit in treating diseases. As such, natural products are the active components not only of most traditional medicines but also of many newer medications. Furthermore, synthetic analogs of natural products with improved potency and safety can be prepared and therefore natural products are often used as Lead Copmpounds for drug discovery. In fact, natural products are the inspiration for approximately one half of U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs. The birth of the natural product synthesis dates back to 1828 when Friedrich Wöhler synthesized urea, a naturally occurring substance from ammonium cyanate. This event as trivial as it may seem by today’s standards not only gave birth to a boundless science called organic synthesis but also contributed to a demystification of mother Nature by burying the fact that synthesis of nature’s molecules is her exclusive domain. The second major achievement in the field of organic synthesis is the synthesis of acetic acid from elemental carbon by Kolbe3 in 1845. It is historically significant because Kolbe coined the word Synthesis for the first time to describe the process of assembling a chemical compound from other substances. The total synthesis of naturally occurring pigments alizarin in 1869 by Graebe and Liebermann and indigo in 1878 by Baeyer represent landmark accomplishments in the field. Probably, after urea, the most spectacular total synthesis of the nineteenth century was that of Emil Fischer’s (‡)-glucose not only for the complexity of the target but also for the considerable stereochemical control that accompanied it. Figure 1: Although the precedent was set in the nineteenth century, it was only in the twentieth century the field of total synthesis started to flourish when Robert Burns Woodward synthesized Quinine. This event ushered in the modern era of total synthesis and Woodward who received the 1965 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for several brilliant examples of total synthesis such as his 1954 synthesis of strychnine, cholesterol5 is regarded as the “father” of modern organic synthesis. Figure 2: Today the art of organic synthesis has improved to astoundingly high levels of sophistication. Through its practice, chemists are able to synthesize organic molecules of all types of structural motifs and for all intents and purposes. Some modern classical examples of total synthesis include the synthesis of prostaglandin PG2α and Ginkgolide by E. J Corey, Ingenol by Wood, Brevetoxin by Nicolaou, Vancomycin by Evans, Taxol by Holton6, Nicolaou7, Wender and Danishefsky8 groups independently. The discipline of natural product synthesis today, is an important field of investigation whose dividends stretch from new scientific knowledge to practical applications. Considered by many as the flagship of organic synthesis, natural product synthesis symbolizes the power of chemical synthesis at any given time and defines its scope and limitations. It also serves to improve chemical synthesis by attempting to push its frontiers into higher molecular complexity, diversity, and efficiency. they can synthesize not only the molecules of nature and their analogues, but also myriad other organic molecules for potential applications in many areas of science, technology and everyday life Introduction to THF-containing natural products Tetrahydrofuran (THF)-containing natural products widely occur in several important families of biologically active compounds, such as the annonaceous acetogenins [1] and polyether antibiotics isolated from Streptomyces organisms (ionomycin, lonomycins A–C, or monensin) [2]. It’s worthwhile at this juncture to discuss few THF ring containing natural products such as which have been of paramount importance to the mankind and also to the researchers who have been actively involved in the synthesis and isolation of these natural products. Acetogenins Acetogenins abbreviated as AAGs are a group of THF-Containing natural products isolated from Annonacae species which are vastly distributed in tropical and subtropical regions. They exhibit different biological activities such as antitumor, ant-imalarial, anti microbial, anti protozoal, pesticidal activities2. The common structural features of acetogenins include several free hydroxy groups with various stereo centers, differently located oxygenated functional groups and tetrahydrofuran (THF) ring(s) along the long hydrocarbon chain with an α, β-unsaturated δ-lactone moiety at the end. Uvaricin, a bis THF acetogenin was the first of the AAGs isolated from Uvaria acuminata in 1982. It exhibited potent anti-cancer activity by inhibiting NADH cells in the mitochondrion. The total synthesis of Hexepi-Uvaricin was published by Hoye in 1994 and subsequently first total synthesis was achieved by Keinan in 1998. Montanacin D is a non classical acetogenin isolated from the ethanolic extract of the leaves of Annona Montana16 by Qin group in 1999, possessing a 4,8-cis THP ring along with a 16,19-trans THF ring. Ionomycin Amphidinolides Amphidinolides constitute a series of unique cytotoxic polyketide macrolides obtained from marine symbiotic dinoflagellates of the genus Amphidinium, which are symbionts of Okinawan marine flatworms Amphiscolops spp.1 They exhibit potent cytotoxic activity against murine lymphoma L1210 cells and human epidermoid carcinoma KB cells. Given below are some important Amphidinolides that incorporate a THF-ring in their structure Pectenotoxins Pectenotoxin (PTX)-group toxins are a group of polyether macrolide compounds found in microalgae and bivalve molluscs of Australia, Japan, New Zealand and some parts of Europe. Their presence in shellfish was discovered due to their high acute toxicity in the mouse bioassay after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of lipophilic extracts of shellfish. Pectinotoxins are exclusively produced by Dinophysis species. In shellfish they are always accompanied by closely related okadaic acid (OA)-group toxins. The common structural features of (PTX)-group toxins include a spiroketal group, three THF-rings, a bicyclic ketal and a six-membered cyclic hemiketal (Allingham et al., 2007). PTX2 is beleived to be the main precursor, from which many PTX-group toxins are derived through biotransformation during metabolism in the gut of bivalves. It is suggested that an oxidation of PTX2 occurs, leading to the formation of other PTX-group toxins, including PTX1, PTX3, and PTX6 PTX-group toxins have been shown to cause cell cycle arrest, cell death and apoptosis. The wide range (10-9 and 10-6 M) of effective concentrations of PTX-group toxins as well as the apparent resistance of some cell lines to the cytotoxic effect of PTX-group toxins indicate the existence of cell-specific factors affecting the sensitivity of biological systems to this group of natural compounds. Studies have confirmed that PTX2 induces apoptosis in several cell lines through multiple mechanisms, involving the perturbation of the cell cycle machinery, inhibition of mitotic separation and cytokinesis through the depolymerization of actin filaments. Oscillariolide and Phormidolide Oscillariolide is a halogenated macrolide isolated from a marine blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. from Gokashowan-Bay, Mie Prefecture. It exhibits significant cytotoxic activity in the echinoderm egg assay. Phormidolide, a closely related macrolide was isolated from the extract of a laboratory culture of an Indonesian isolate of the cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. It displayed cytotoxicity towards drine shrimp with a LC50 of 1.5 µM. The characteristic features of both oscillariolide and phormidolide include a trisubstituted bridged THF macrolactone with a long polyhydroxy chain containing a unique terminal bromo diene. Structural elucidation revealed that the polyhydroxy side as well as THF ring of both compounds have same stereochemistry Chagosensine Chagosensine is a sixteen-membered chlorinated macrolide isolated from the methanolic chloroform extract of a bright yellow sponge Leucetta chagosensis usually found in the coral reefs of Red Sea, Aqaba Gulf (Israel). the extract of the Leucetta sp. sponge exhibited potent ability to inhibit the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. A new mechanism for the action of naamidine A and inhibition of tumor cells was shown.

A culture of diversity at deutsche bank

A culture of diversity at deutsche bank. The stalwart bank promises complete commitment and boasts of living through its people .It is significantly known for its culture that nurtures talent, EMBRACES DIVERSITY and rewards outstanding performances. Its idea of achieving success lies in attracting the best talent in the market via demographic changes .In the year 2009 itself 1,429 apprentices were employed in Germany and around 771 university graduates were recruited globally. As per their statement Deutsche Bank is committed to a ‘One Bank Culture’, and not a ‘One Culture Bank’ ,which goes beyond age, gender, disability, religion, ethnic origin or sexual identity as for the German Bank a diverse culture is not just desirable but it is an essential part of their style of conducting business. Adaptability is what the bank adheres to by extracting its strengths from the its employees from varied cultural backgrounds and specific countries speaking different languages and following different religious norms .This helps it to cater to the various clients/customers with varied needs and desires and in return makes them stronger, more agile and smarter for delivering innovative solutions for their clients. The following data gives the analysis of the varied regions and age groups that the employees of the bank hail from. Regions Germany 35.5 % 34.7 % 35.5 % Europe (excluding Germany), Middle East and Africa 28.6 % 28.7 % 28.1 % Americas 14.5 % 15.3 % 17.2 % Asia / Pacific 21.4 % 21.3 % 19.2 % Age3 up to 24 years 8.4 % 9.9 % 10.0 % 25 – 34 years 35.0 % 35.5 % 35.2 % 35 – 44 years 32.2 % 31.7 % 32.3 % 45 – 54 years 19.0 % 17.9 % 17.9 % over 54 years 5.4 % 5.0 % 4.6 % Provision of an environment that supports people from all nooks and corners of the world helps the bank in creating a base in this competitive era with other international banks like HSBC, RBS etc going global. Diversity helps them in customization as per the requirement of the situation. They aim at fostering an inclusive culture that values the diverse mix of their employees, utilizes their talents and helps them realize their full potential. The bank provides an inclusive and supportive environment in which all employees can advance their careers and professional skills. Their employee networks offer opportunities for people with similar professional interests and corporate values to meet and network on a regular basis through meetings and events. TOP MAN OF DEUTSCHE BANK – His style of management of the cultural issues: CODE OF CONDUCT THOUGHTS /OPINIONS COMMUNICATION Dr. Joseph Ackermann who is the top man of deutsche bank is currently the Chairman of the Management board and the Group Executive Committee became the most powerful man in Germany’s financial industry because of the global focus that he provided Deutsche Bank with. Facing immense opposition from the people who still were engrossed into traditional mediums of functioning Dr.Ackermann brought about a revolution with his vision for globalization and focus on shareholders and international performance. He spearheaded the merger of the U.S.-based Bankers Trust into Deutsche Bank in 1998 and was credited with facilitating the move by using an integrative and communicative approach. In 1999 Ackermann’s leadership of the global operations and institutions department generated 60 percent of Deutsche Bank’s year-end revenues. Well with this urge for globalization he also concentrated on the amalgamation of its diverse workforce with the bank’s environment for the purpose of facing up challenges and seizing opportunities. Diversity councils have been formed at various locations worldwide under the leadership of top management during 2009. These councils are responsible for ensuring that the global diversity strategy based on Deutsche Bank’s strategic goals is implemented also at regional level. Particular emphasis is given on growing the number of women in senior positions, and the Women on Wall Street and Women in European Business networks and highly successful conferences are just two examples of their commitment to this. As this was Dr.Ackermann’s vision he launched the ATLAS(Accomplished Top Leaders Advancement Strategy) program, in order to provide women leaders in the Bank with direct sponsorship from Group Executive Committee members. He encourages the bank’s commitment towards its diverse workforce with a view of receiving benefits in return with better compatibility with the clients in terms of provision of financial services. Depending on the location the employees are offered work-life balance benefits, pension plans and contributions, flexible work arrangements and health and advice services. Deutsche Bank achieved 19th place in the Universum 2009 “World’s Most Attractive Employers” survey involving some 120,000 students at top universities. It also climbed to 7th position in the Hay Group’s ten “Most Admired Companies” in the banking sector, because of its culture at the work place. Dr. Ackermann has also supported various corporate social responsibilities : Pakistan Aid: New elementary school for girls: The employees and clients of Deutsche Bank have been asked to make donations for the construction of an elementary school for girls in northern Pakistan. Relief funds: Once again the employees of Deutsche Bank came together from various corners of the world to raise fund for the victims of the Pakistan floods. Little Artists Staff Art Exhibition and Auction: Under his able guidance Deutsche bank extensively supports this program for educating the little children in the inner cities of Johannesburg by hosting art exhibitions wherein the paintings are mostly purchased by the employees from branches worldwide and the fund raised is thus utilized for the aforementioned purpose. Thus Dr. Ackermann is a man with a vision for the bank that promotes a healthy work environment primarily for the growth of the bank and its profits. His mission has always been globalization by recruiting a diverse workforce for better treatment of situations with the clients. At Deutsche Bank, diversity is thus seen as an important aspect of corporate culture and a commercial imperative. Performance is the basis, irrespective of nationality, religion, race, sexual orientation, gender, age or ethnic origin. He has been successful in convincing one and all that in the long run, the German bank will remain competitive if and only if it will rely on a broadly diversified workforce that cooperates closely across every kind of border. As an employer of people from 139 nations, it is essential for them to provide a bias-free, stimulating and inclusive working environment. Thus he certainly emerges out to be a friend and definitely not a threat to for the people working in his organization. He is a very strategic thinker and is very accommodative of the opinion of others however he does have a mind of his own which makes a good combination.Dr. Ackermann aims at making the bank an exciting place for the employees to work in .New schemes for compensation of the work both formally and informally has been devised .Bonuses in the good times and other variable components of the compensation schemes are provided in the form of company shares thus strongly following a performance based structure. THE GERMAN WORK CULTURE: In today’s global market it is essential to understand a country’s culture in order to be able to form and maintain a positive business relationship. Culture is something that is taught and shared, it sculpts the way people interact with others, handle situations, and solve problems. It is formed by values, society norms and historical factors. It explains why and how multinational corporations and international partnerships succeed or fail. The business culture in Germany is classified according to the living and working systems that abide by meticulous structure with very little flexibility. Planning every detail and moment provides a sense of security in knowing what will happen when. It also allows them to plan their time efficiently and effectively.If employees are seen working late it is viewed as poor planning on their part. Due to their view on planning, it is understandable why punctuality is an asset. It is mandatory to set appointments at least a week or two in advance and if one is delayed on coming then he/she should call immediately with an explanation. Germany business’s use a hierarchy structure. The companies are well ordered and all employees are aware of their positions. The highest ranking person always enters and leaves a meeting first, as a sign of respect of their authority. From an early age German’s are taught to respect authority automatically and not to question the method in which they are taught to accomplish duties. This is apparent in business meetings. Meetings may be held in an open discussion but in order to participate, the employee must be either an expert in the field or have a proven record.The final decision is up to management and employees are expected to implement all task without hesitation CULTURAL CHALLENGES FACED BY DEUTSCHE BANK AND THE RE-ENGINEERING REQUIRED: Also some amount of light should be thrown on the gender diversity issue regarding the ratio of women: men which appear to be quite low. The ATLAS program has been started in full flow with the view of training women for occupying the top management positions in the organization. One of the key challenges faced by the bank was the financial crisis in the year 2009 .As per the records available the number of full time employees had fallen by 4.2% in comparison to the year 2008 worldwide. However the German bank did not surrender to a large scale restructuring but withstood the crises with great caliber and stability. They ultimately recruited a huge number of graduates from all over the globe organizing Summer Internship programs for the students thus recruited. However these internship sessions should be more concrete and well organized as they tend to give the students the opportunities for gaining experience of its daily business operations across the Deutsche Bank Group. Cross cultural management should also be one of the key ingredients of the training programs which would actually make the students indulge into a better understanding of the different norms and work styles of the management hailing from varied cultural backgrounds. It is important to recognize that people from different cultures are different in a variety of ways, including different ways of attending meetings and negotiations which makes understanding of the cultural differences even more necessary and important. Another major issue that came to my notice while surveying one of its branches in Bangalore (India) was that the employees there sometimes experience a disconnect, in terms of understanding of Indian values and traditions. Also the language and articulation sometimes hinders the flow of information. For the Germans, punctuality is a serious issue. Germans typically plan their time very carefully. It is considered a bad etiquette to be late or early as it shows disrespect for people’s time. In India, punctuality is expected, although being 10 minutes late will not have disastrous consequences. Flexibility is paramount. Also people in Deutsche Bank certainly respect cultural differences and acknowledge them to a great degree. As observed by the workforce in India ,on the auspicious occasion of Eid which even though fell on a Wednesday, a day for the employees to be dressed in formals Muslims working there were allowed to wear their traditional attire to office. However there is a need to make employees feel more comfortable with their work environment and assure greater involvement of people on the wider organization related issues. The employees should be provided with regular performance appraisals including the 360 degree appraisal for making them familiar with the others around. The need for provision of training for various other languages that is other than the ones already known to the employees in another major necessity. This will help in better communication and also in better development of the interpersonal relationship amongst the employees. Informal meetings and recreational programs for people from various branches from all over the world should be organized for giving them an opportunity to understand the other cultures better. A culture of diversity at deutsche bank