Get help from the best in academic writing.

University of Phoenix Ch 4 Strength Based Programs and Adversity Discussion

University of Phoenix Ch 4 Strength Based Programs and Adversity Discussion.

Your original response to the Discussion topic should be at least 350 words and should reflect the fact that you have completed the Reading and activities. Use your words wisely so that the posting has substance and includes examples and explanations. Best practice is to include citations and a reference list.Take time to review the responses of your classmates and respond specifically and substantially to at least two other students’ postings.Please use your chapter reading and the Library to research peer reviewed journal articles to respond to the following:Strength-Based Programs and AdversityIn Chapter 4 of your text, you learned the characteristics of a Strength-Based program and a Risk-Based program. You also learned about how individual characteristics can contribute to different responses to adversity.Please use the reading from Chapter 4 of your text and the Library to research peer reviewed journal articles to respond to the following:Define adversity and explain how the diversity of the individual contributes to resiliency.Discuss the characteristics of a Strength-Based community program and a Risk Based community program.Compare and contrast the two different types of community programs listed above.Analyze the benefit of identifying and building on strengths in individuals, families, and the community.
University of Phoenix Ch 4 Strength Based Programs and Adversity Discussion

Most of the time when we start up our computers, the CPU or Central Processing Unit goes through a series of steps or procedures before the computer operating systems boots from the hard disk. These initial steps are all categorized in a system called CMOS which stands for Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor. This is the where the systems settings such as the system clock, hard disk status, optical drives and other settings like the CPU’s clock speed, FSB and so on are all on this setting. On the other hand, the chip that stores the settings is known as the BIOS chip also known as Basic Input Output System. This holds the most basic computer instructions that are required to boot the operating system like Windows XP or Linux based operating systems such as Ubuntu. Many people always get mistaken by calling is a CMOS chip, but since the BIOS and CMOS is so tightly intertwined, they can be both referred to as one (Difference between CMOS and BIOS, Dennis Faas). In other words, the CMOS chip stores the data needed for the BIOS so that the computer may boot us properly. The battery used to store the data is a lithium button battery which is located just near the CMOS chip and the CMOS jumper. This battery hold provides power to the CMOS chip even when the power of the computer is shut off. This is necessary where the chip is volatile, means that it will lose data when there is no power unlike a hard disk which work on magnetism. What is BIOS

AU Ethical Concerns in Computing Essential Tools in Problem Solving Essay

AU Ethical Concerns in Computing Essential Tools in Problem Solving Essay.

Final PaperFor the Final Paper, you will select one topic from the list below. You will want to choose a topic that is important or interesting to you.Instructions for completing the Final Paper:Please select from one of the following topics, which are addressed in the course textbook, Introduction to Computer Literacy:Collaborative Technologies (covered in Chapter 1)Ethical Concerns in Computing (covered in Chapter 1)The Digital Divide (covered in Chapter 1)Open Source Software (covered in Chapter 3)The Impact of Mobile Computing (covered in Chapter 4)Social Networks (covered in Chapter 7)Protecting Copyrights and Intellectual Property (covered in Chapter 8)The Future of Cloud Computing (covered in Chapter 9)Return to the textbookand review the pages in the chapter that pertain to your selected topic.Next, login to the Ashford University Library and conduct a search on that topic.The INF103 tutorial (Links to an external site.) will walk you through the basic steps of doing a search for scholarly articles within the Ashford University Library. A transcript of this video can be accessed through your online course.Select two scholarly articles to use in your paper. For each article, write down the author information, date of publication, title of the article, the publication information (journal title), and the database from which you retrieved the article. You will need this information when you create your references for the sources.Begin the writing process. You are going to compare the points of view offered by these authors (the author of your textbook and the authors of the two articles you have selected) on your selected topic, and then offer your own point of view based upon your analysis of the readings.The Ashford Writing Center (AWC) offers assistance with the writing process. The AWC contains many tutorials and offers online guides for how to develop an academic paper. Click on the Writing Center link under “Learning Resources” in the left navigation of this course to visit the AWC.Criteria for GradingYou will be graded on how well your paper meets the following criteria:ContentHow clearly you demonstrate your knowledge of your chosen topic.Frequent and appropriate use of examples from the textbook and selected articles to support your points.Appropriate inclusion of relevant quotes from the discussion forum activities.At least one paragraph for each of your three sources (the textbook and two scholarly articles) that includes an accurate summary of the points made by the author(s).At least one paragraph for each of your three sources showing your thoughtful analysis of the point of view introduced by the authors.At least two paragraphs illustrating how the authors of those three sources agree or disagree with one another about the topic.At least two paragraphs that reflect your own point of view and provide a conclusion about your chosen topic.FormThe way your paper looks is also important to this assignment.Complete your assignment using Microsoft Word.Include a proper title page.Use correct APA formatting for an academic paper (see the Ashford Writing Center tutorial).Use proper citation style for all quotes.Your paper must be between five to seven pages long (excluding title and references pages).Make sure to review your paper for grammar and use the Spell Check function in Microsoft Word before submitting your work.
AU Ethical Concerns in Computing Essential Tools in Problem Solving Essay

Crj domestic violence

order essay cheap Crj domestic violence.

Please answer these 4 questions and cite your answer. each answer should be 200-400 words. Question 1Please answer the question to the best of your ability as if it was present day. This question is worth 50 points. Please cite your sources. On April 19, of this year, you were called to start the investigation of a bomb blast at the IRS building in Flagstaff, Arizona. Upon arrival to the building, you observe the building leveled and many are killed or injured. Clearly this was a powerful and sophisticated explosive device. You find an unattended vehicle with literature and reading from the Waco incident and Ruby Ridge. Later, you learn the car had an additional explosive devise set to detonate after the main explosion or when investigators open the door.Who do you think could be responsible and why?What associations or groups could this suspect belong to and why?Why would a US Post Office be bombed?Q 2Some argue that the term ANTIFA appears to be a misnomer, or perhaps a red herring by the far left with Marxists leanings to silence free speech from the conservatives with acts of violence. Most recently, ANTIFA has apparently been designated a terrorist group by the USDOJ.Please identify and support in your answer if you feel ANTIFA is a domestic terrorist group, international terrorist group, or HVE?Please identify specific actions that ANTIFA have allegedly committed to be listed as a terrorist group by USDOJ.Are there any Anti-ANTIFA groups that pose strong or possible violent opposition to ANTIFA? If so, who and where are they, and are they too domestic terrorists?Q3Please answer the question to the best of your ability as if it was present day. This question is worth 50 points. Please cite your sources.You are assigned to investigate a possible domestic terror attack which occurred on April 19 (of this year). The attack occurred at a Catholic Church where many different immigrant parishioners attend. Many of the immigrants are from Africa and the Caribbean.The attack occurred after-hours and there was a fire set near the church and adjoining Catholic grade school. – Spray painted on the wall was, “Go home, America is not for you,” along with racial slurs.Who do you think could be responsible and why?What groups could the perpetrators be associated?Is there any relationship of this event to others?Q4Theodore John “Ted” Kaczynski was arrested in 1995 after many years of bombings. The FBI labeled him a terrorist in part because of the bombings and mayhem he created but also his demands that his manifesto be published. Once his manifesto was published it appeared that the author (Kaczynski) was seriously mentally ill. After his arrests this mental state was confirmed.In the manifesto Kaczynski has moments of clarity closely following many famous philosophers including Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) particularly his work Vom Wesen der Wahrheit (“On the Essence of Truth”, 1930) and Die Frage nach der Technik (“The Question Concerning Technology (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.”, 1954). Heidegger is also infamous for his involvement with the Nazi party during WWII. The Kaczynski manifesto also contains resemblances to writings from Hans-George Gadamer.Question:If Kaczynski started his bombing campaign today would he still be labeled by the FBI as a domestic terrorist or something else?Using materials and examples you have been exposed to in this class and any outside materials, please explain your position if Kaczynski would or would not be considered a domestic terrorist.
Crj domestic violence

Florida International University Wyndham Hotels and Resorts Summary Case Study

Florida International University Wyndham Hotels and Resorts Summary Case Study.

I’m working on a law writing question and need guidance to help me learn.

1. Read the assigned case below, summarize it and what you learned from the case and how you would apply it in a management situation. Post on Canvas. Be prepared to present your assigned case in class.ADA/StandingBrito v. Wyndham Hotels and Resorts, LLC, 2018 WL 317464 (D. Colo., 01/08/2018). Plaintiff is a paraplegic and requires the use of a wheelchair to ambulate. While at defendant hotel he encountered multiple violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) that effected his use and enjoyment of the premises and sued. The hotel challenged plaintiff’s standing. To establish standing, a plaintiff must show, inter alia, that he suffered an injury in fact. To prove that, plaintiff must establish a likelihood that he will return to defendant’s premises. Factors a court considers are the proximity of the business to plaintiff’s residence, the plaintiff’s past patronage of the business, the definitiveness of plaintiff’s plan to return, and the plaintiff’s frequency of travel near defendant. In the complaint plaintiff stated he lives in the same county as defendant, he has frequented defendant hotel for “pleasure purposes,” he was a guest at the premises for a two day stay, and he alleges an intention to return within four months. This constitutes a personal stake in the outcome to constitute standing and avoid dismissal of the complaint.2. Video Link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gN9b3sMEpfo (Links to an external site.)
Florida International University Wyndham Hotels and Resorts Summary Case Study

Compare and Contrast the Development of B and T Cells

Compare and Contrast the Development of B and T Cells. The epithelial surfaces of the body serve as an effective barrier against most microorganisms, and they are rapidly repaired if wounded. Adaptive immunity is initiated when an innate immune response fails to eliminate a new infection, whereby an activated antigen presenting cells (APCs) bearing pathogen’s antigens are delivered to the draining lymphoid tissues. An adaptive immune response differs from the innate immunity in its ability to target structures that are specific to particular strains and variants of pathogen. T cells are produced in the bone marrow. They are transported still, as pro-thymocytes to the thymus where they undergo the process of maturation and selection. The regulation of T cell maturation in the thymus is termed ‘central tolerance’. During gestation, most T cells generated bear the gamma/deta T cell receptor (TcR) on their surface. In the adult, most T cells bear the alpha/beta TcR. The newly formed TcR then, has to be tested for recognition of self-MHC/peptide. The T cells are tested at a stage of development known as double positive, meaning that they bear both CD4 and CD8 receptors on their surface. Cells with TcRs that recognize self-MHC/peptide with very low affinity will die. This process is known as death by neglect. Cells with TcRs with medium affinity for MHC receive survival signals and undergo a process known as positive selection. Finally, cells which receive a high affinity signal via their TcR die by apoptosis, a process known as negative selection. Cells that interact with MHC class I become CD8 positive T cell, and those that interact with MHC class II become CD4 positive T cells, before migrating out into the peripheral lymphoid system (Wood P, 2006). Mature B cells, like T cell, are also develop form pluripotent stem cells. However unlike T cells lymphocytes, B cell maturation occurs in the bone marrow. There are four different stages of B cell development: pro-B, pre-B, immature B, and mature B cells. During its development, B cells acquire B cell surface marker expression such as B220, CD19, CD20, etc. as well as antigen receptors. The stromal cells lining the bone marrow provide essential growth signals to developing B cells, including cytokines such as IL7 and cell to cell contact, via VLA4/VCAM and Kit/SCF. During B cell development, gene segment rearrangements take place, just like in T cells where TcR rearrangements (central tolerance) also occur. However, for B cells, the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus (variable-V, joining-J and diversity-D segments), situated on chromosome 14, rearranges. In haematopoietic stem cells, the Ig heavy chain genes are in germline configuration (Kurosaki T et al., 2009). As B cells develop to pro-B cells, a D-J recombination is the first gene rearrangement to take place. The intervening DNA is normally deleted from the chromosome as a circle. Gene rearrangements are mediated by recombinase activitng genes, RAG proteins. As the developing B cell proceeds from pro- to pre-B cell stage, a V-DJ gene arrangement takes place to form the VDJ coding block that encodes the variable domain on the antibody heavy chain. Gene rearrangement takes place on both copies of chromosome 14 in a developing B cell, but once a productive VDJ block has been assembled on one chromosome 14, rearrangement ceases on the other chromosome, ensuring only one type of Ig is produced by any single B cell. This process is known as allelic exclusion. If a developing B cell fails to make a productive VDJ block, it will fail to produce antibody heavy chain and die in the bone marrow (Murphy K et al, 2008). T and B cell activation: T cell activation takes place in draining lymph nodes (also spleen) close to site of infection. T cell recognizes antigen on MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex) molecules becomes activated and differentiates to effector cells. Effector T cells migrate to site of infection and carry out effector functions. The T lymphocytes arrive through venules, and cross through the endothelial to the lymph nodes. Antigen presenting cells such (APC) such as dendritic cells, and macrophages presented antigens to T cells. On recognition of the antigen, a low affinity interaction is formed. These T cells then leave lymph node though the lymphatic system. Those T cells that recognize the antigen’s wall with high affinity will be retained and the process of proliferation and differentiation occurs. However, initial B cell activation takes place in T cell zone of secondary lymphatic tissues (i.e. in lyhmph nodes). Mostly IgM producing plasma cells are produced at this state. B cells, unlike T cells, are activated by the ineraction with antigen-specific T cell, by linked recognition. Antigen-activated B cell migrates to B cell area of lymph nodes to form organized germinal centres, where additional B cell differentiation processes take place. It is important to note that T cells recognize the peptide, while B cells recognize the coat protein. For T and B lymphocyte activation 2 signals are hypothesized to be required. Firstly, the antigen stimulus signal and secondly, the co-stimulatory stimulus. The absence of the second signal results in anergy or apoptosis. CD28/B7 interaction is the co-stimulatory signals for T cells while CD40/CD40 ligand, on the activated T cells, interaction is for B cells. For both T and B lymphocytes, in it resting G0 cell cycle, the cell appear to have a large nucleus, with little cytoplasm and show little evidence of organelles. However, when these cells enter G1/S/G2 cell cycle, cell shows an increase in cell size, chromatin de-condensation is seen. Cell division occurs rapidly, generating effector cells of either T or B lymphocytes. Effector T cells include Th1, Th2 and T regulatory, as well as T cytotoxic cell and memory T cells. On the other hand, effector B cells include plasma cell and memory B cell. T and B cell effector functions: B cell response to T-dependent protein antigen results in germinal centres formation in B cell areas of lymph nodes, and specialized processes such as Ig class-switching, somatic mutation and affinity maturation, memory B cell and plasma cell generation take place there. Emerging form germinal centres are somatically mutated and class-switched B cells, which no longer just produce IgM. Memory B cells are long-lived, resting and re-circulating cells, responsible for immunization part which helpto generate rapid and vigorous immune response on second encounter for that specific antigen. Plamablast cells migrate to other sites such as bone marrow, and become plasma cells, producing large amounts of secreted antibody. Some of which can live for long periods. The effector functions of B cells refer to what antibodies do after their contact with the antigen. The antibody effector functions include neutralization, complement fixation (IgM, IgG1/2/3), oposonization and antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, T cell effector functions differ significantly from B cell effector functions. Antigen presenting cells present peptide via MHC which can either interact with CD4 or CD8 T cells. Helper T cells are defined by the cytokines they produce. Naïve CD4 T cells (Th0), on interaction with APC, can differentiate to Th1 or Th2 cells, depending on the cytokine environment. Th1 cells co-ordinate inflammatory immune responses to intracellular pathogens while Th2 cells help B cells to make antibodies required for immune responses to extracellular pathogens, this is known as humoral immunity. Th1 and Th2 cells both act to promote the generation of more leukocytes. Besides Th0/Th1/Th2, other CD4 T cell subsets exist (Zhu J et al., 2010). Resting T cells can differentiate into activated helper T cell, as well as activated cytotoxic T cell (CD8 T cell). Initially, CD8 T cells interact with potential target cells via low affinity/non-specific interactions between adhesion molecules on the T cell (LFA-1 and CD2) and the target cell (ICAM1, ICAM2). This interaction has no effect on the cytoskeleton of the T cell and is a transient interaction unless recognition of specific peptide:MHC complexes occurs. If peptide:MHC I complex is present, the affinity of the adhesion molecule interaction increases and there is clustering of T cell receptor and associated molecules at the point of contact with the target cell forming the immunological synapse. This also signals for cytoskeletal rearrangements organized by the microtubule organizing complex which focuses the cytotoxic granules of the T cell at the point of contact with the target. Notice here, that T cells, unlike B cells do not produce antibodies against antigens. Granules containing perforin and other enzymes including granzymes are released and induce the activation of the cathepsin pathways in the target cell leading to apoptosis. CD8 T cells can also kill target cells via the Fas/FasL pathway which also induces apoptosis (Peter EJ 2007). In conclusion, adaptive immune responses occur when individual lymphocytes capable of responding to antigen proliferate and differentiate to become an antigen-specific effector cells and memory cells. The process of lymphocyte cell cycle progression, proliferation and differentiation in response to antigen and stimuli is known as lymphocyte activation. B cell activation is initiated by the ligation of the B cell receptor (BCR) with antigen and ultimately results in the production of protective antibodies against potentially pathogenic invaders. While naive or memory T cells encounter foreign antigen along with proper co-stimulation they undergo rapid and extensive clonal expansion. In human, this type of proliferation is fairly unique to cells of the adaptive immune system and requires a considerable expenditure of energy and cellular resources. Compare and Contrast the Development of B and T Cells