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The Principle of Surviving The term surviving means different things to different people.

The definition of surviving means to remain healthy, happy, and unaffected In spite of an occurrence or struggle. In the story ‘To Build a Fire’ by Jack London, the mall character Is seen as a survivor; or a person who Is unaffected by an endeavor. He has the skirmish with nature In this story, and he loses that battle. He doesn’t meet his objective of reaching the cabin In Henderson Creek where he has the conception of meeting the boys and having dinner.In class we have been discussing the subject of survival, and we read some tips on surviving out In the wilderness or Just surviving anywhere. They include: Perceive and Believe, which means look, see. And believe.

If some thing goes sour, look for the positives. Staying calm, which means using fear for focus. Use the fear inside to make you strive to complete a goal. Think/ analyze/plan, which means stay organized, and make the big, scary goal into small, manageable tasks that you can complete. Take correct and decisive actions, which means being adventurous yet cautious and wise at the same time.Celebrate you successes, and take joy in completing those tasks that you once thought were unconquerable. Count your blessing, and be grateful – you are alive! Play, meaning do math in your head, play mental games, and things like that that will keep your mind sharp and focused.

See the Beauty in things; nature is beautiful, and in times where situations can be daunting, look up at the sky, look around at the trees, just bask in the beauty of life itself. Believe that you will Succeed; keep positive thoughts in your adventures and struggles in life.Believing that you will succeed will make succeeding even more glorifying than not believing in yourself and failing to complete your task, because even if you fail, you’ll still know that you tried your hardest. Surrender, and put away the fears that you have and the pain you feel. When you give Into pain and give Into fear, you automatically lose, because no matter how hard you try, you can’t get the weight of the pains ad the fears off of your shoulders; letting go will make you forget about them so they cannot weigh you down anymore. Do whatever Is necessary, and take actions you wouldn’t take In other situations.Always keep an pen mind when you are struggling to survive.

And never give up. Once you know that the task Is compellable, complete It. Don’t focus on the path that you are taking, focus on the destination you are trying to reach. The fact of the matter Is that the mall character In To Build a Fire’ Isn’t a survivor. He does some of these tips noted above, and he did do some things right, but more wrong. Much more wrong than right. He did follow the tips of staying focused, surrendering to pain, and doing whatever is necessary.

If he had followed the rest of the rules, his journey would eave been more successful.He should have just kept his head up, stayed calm, and carried on: and we would have been just fine. To build a fire By Cookbook’s of surviving means to remain healthy, happy, and unaffected in spite of an occurrence or struggle. In the story ‘To Build a Fire’ by Jack London, the main character is seen as a survivor; or a person who is unaffected by an endeavor. He has the skirmish with nature in this story, and he loses that battle. He doesn’t meet his objective of reaching the cabin in Henderson Creek where he has the conception of object of survival, and we read some tips on surviving out in the wilderness or Just surviving anywhere.They include: Perceive and Believe, which means look, see, and using fear for focus.

Use the fear inside to make you strive to complete a goal. Think/ successes, and take Joy in completing those tasks that you once thought were situations can be daunting, look up at the sky, look around at the trees, Just bask in put away the fears that you have and the pain you feel. When you give into pain and give into fear, you automatically lose, because no matter how hard you try, you can’t roger about them so they cannot weigh you down anymore.Do whatever is necessary, and take actions you wouldn’t take in other situations. Always keep an that the task is compellable, complete it. Don’t focus on the path that you are taking, The fact of the matter is that the main character in ‘To Build a Fire’ isn’t a survivor. He does some of these tips whatever is necessary.

If he had followed the rest of the rules, his Journey would have been more successful. He should have Just kept his head up, stayed calm, and carried on; and we would have been Just fine.

American Lit, Workshop

Read “The Red Wheelbarrow” and “This Is Just to Say” and answer the following questions:
1. How do these poems look? How does their typographical presentation affect the way you read and hear them?
2. In “The Red Wheelbarrow,” what information is left out of the poem? Are you left wondering about the speaker, the setting, and the context?
3. How would you describe the tone of “The Red Wheelbarrow”?
4. Who is the speaker in “This Is Just to Say”? Who is the intended reader? Is it the recipient of the note or some larger reading community?
5. In “This Is Just to Say,” line 9 asks the addressee to “Forgive me.” Is this poem meant to be an apology? If so, how sincere is the speaker’s regret?
6. What clues does “This Is Just to Say” provide about the relationship between the speaker and the addressee? How would you describe their relationship?
7. When Williams originally published the poem anthologized here as “The Red Wheelbarrow” in his 1923 collection Spring and All, it appeared without a title, under the roman numerals xxii. Over the course of many reprintings, the poem seems to have acquired the title “The Red Wheelbarrow.” Some literary critics, however, see this title as going against Williams’s intentions. What difference does it make whether the poem is titled “The Red Wheelbarrow” or marked only with a number? How does reading the poem with or without a title affect your understanding of its meaning?
8. “The Red Wheelbarrow” does not have a regular meter, but each stanza consists of one line made up of three words followed by a line consisting of a single two-syllable word. What is the effect of this pattern?
9. Why do you think Williams chose to split the compound words wheelbarrow and rainwater with line breaks? How does the printed division of these words change your understanding of them by making you focus on their parts?
10. The only example of figurative language in “The Red Wheelbarrow” is the word glazed, in line 5. What does this word mean? What does it mean to describe a wheelbarrow as “glazed” with rain?
11. The speaker of “The Red Wheelbarrow” tells us immediately that “so much depends upon” the wheelbarrow, but he never actually specifies what exactly that “so much” is. What do you think the speaker means? What is it that “depends” on the wheelbarrow?
12. Does the title “This Is Just to Say” function, in some ways, as the poem’s first line? Why or why not? What does the word just mean in this context?
13. In his interview with John W. Gerber in 1950, Williams claimed that “This Is Just to Say” is “metrically absolutely regular.” In fact, the poem has no regular metrical patterns—there is no discernible order to the stresses and syllable counts in each line. Do you see any other kinds of structures or patterns in the poem?
14. There is no punctuation in “This Is Just to Say,” but the word “Forgive,” which opens the third stanza, is capitalized. What is the effect of this capitalization? Why might Williams have wanted to mark some kind of separation between this final stanza and the previous two stanzas?
16. The speaker of “This Is Just to Say” concludes by describing the taste of the plums he has just eaten: “so sweet / and so cold.” Do you think these lines are intended to replace the experience of eating the plums for the person who was saving them for breakfast? How might this description work as a kind of repayment? What point about the nature and responsibilities of representation might Williams be making here?
17. “This Is Just to Say” has inspired many imitations and parodies. Read Kenneth Koch’s marvelous “Variations on a Theme by William Carlos Williams” available from the Poetry Foundation, and listen to the parodies by contributors to the public radio show This American Life available here.You might also use the Internet to locate and read other parodies and imitations of this poem. Do these responses to Williams’s poem change the way you understand it? Do they affect the way you think about the speaker and his actions? If you’re inspired, write your own parody or imitation of the poem.
18. Some readers have found symbolic significance in the plums in “This Is Just to Say” and the wheelbarrow in “The Red Wheelbarrow” (arguing, for example, that the plums represent the innocence of Eden and the speaker’s consumption of them represents his “fall” or that the wheelbarrow represents the importance of rural labor). Other readers have insisted that to make these objects into symbols—that is, to see them as standing for anything other than themselves—is to miss the point of the poems.Taking this debate into account, re-read the poems and make some notes on how you understand the objects represented in them. Do you think the objects are meant to function as symbols? If so, of what? Or do you think Williams is making a different kind of point? If so, what?
19. As the transcript from Williams’s 1950 interview with John W. Gerber makes clear, readers have sometimes reacted to pieces like “This Is Just to Say” by questioning their status as poetry. As Gerber put it, “[‘This Is Just to Say’] goes against so many preconceived ideas of the poem … because it’s the kind of thing that almost anybody might say.”Write a short response in which you discuss your opinion on whether “This Is Just to Say” and “The Red Wheelbarrow,” in this sense, “qualify” as poems? Consider how you define and recognize poetry and what standards you apply.