Get help from the best in academic writing.

The World Anti-Doping Agency Essay

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is an independent organization that promotes scientific research and monitors the development of anti-doping campaigns. In addition, the organization puts forward the World Anti Doping Code, the document that harmonizes anti-doping strategies in sport. According to this Code, all athletes should compete in a doping-free environment. The analysis of the origins of the organization sheds light on the policies and approaches that the agency applies and, therefore, specific attention should be paid to the evaluation of those principles with regard to the ethical principles introduced by the Global Business Standards Codex. A critical assessment of WADA’s regulatory regime is possible by implementing such ethical principles as transparency, fairness, and dignity. From the perspective of the transparency principle, the WADA’s code should be more concerned with the issues of publicity and objectivity. In this respect, the question arises concerning the morality of the strategies used by the agency. The sporting events, therefore, should not be recognized as corporate activities subject to political and economic environments. According to Hanstad et al. (2008), “doping was primarily a public relations problem that threatened lucrative television and corporate contracts…worth billions of dollars” (p. 230). Therefore, while adopting anti-doping campaign, the organization at issue should be more focused on the developing equal and beneficial opportunities for individuals participating in sporting events rather than on commercial issues. Such an assumption refers directly to the case of the Atlanta Olympics when several doping tests were not given to publicity for commercial purposes. In order to improve the situation the WAGA agency should be more concerned with the transparent reporting to ensure sustainability and control of the sporting events. A transparency policy can effectively be applied through adherence to moral commitment to anti-doping campaign. Transparency issues can also be improved as soon as the anti-doping campaign is regarded as a form of social monitoring. Surveillance of all procedures and development of individual check-control systems constitute an important technique that should be reconsidered by WADA’s officials. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More To integrate changes to a social domain, the agency’s code should undergo philosophical transformation. According to Slugget (2011), “WADA’ surveillance practices often extend beyond sport’s walls and typically involve multiple, interacting agendas including efficiency, policing, legitimation, and appearance of control” (p. 31). Hence, involving conceptual frameworks is essential for reconsidering the purposes of anti-doping policies adopted by the agency. In addition, the surveillance policies implemented by the agency should come in congruence with the cultural patterns. Within these provisions Park (2005) emphasizes, “sport is a central cultural technology of governing the social body, a technology to help maintain the body of the population be healthy, efficient, and productive” (p. 177). Therefore, the governments should rely heavily on cultural practices before implementing a set of ethical principles. In particular, they should prioritize equality, fair competition, and treatment instead of demonstrating high performance by all means. Looking WAGA regulatory regimes from the fairness principle, the attention should be paid to the analysis fair treatment, training, and performance principles adjusted for all athletes. Within this context, the fairness principle, on the one hand claims, “athletes have a contractual obligation of sorts to abide by the rules governing a sports, and the use of a prohibited substance breaks or implicit agreement” (Hemphill 2009, p. 314). Alternatively, the violation of agreement would imply unfair treatment of the parties concerned. On the other hand, a more serious infringement of the contract also contributes to unfair competition among the athletes, as well as violation of the equality rights. We will write a custom Essay on The World Anti-Doping Agency specifically for you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More In this respect, “to gain an unfair advantage by intentionally using a prohibited means in training or in performance is considered to be cheating” (Hemphill 2009, p. 314). With regard to the above-presented considerations, the fairness principle relies on such aspects as equal and transparent competition, as well as protection of individual rights during games. Apart from the equality issues, the fairness principle implies liability and commitment to ensuring equal treatment during competition. Striking the balance between one’s individual privacy right and the necessity to eradicate spread of doping in sports is an important issue that should be taken into the deepest consideration. In this respect, Halt (2009) refers to Article 8 of European Code, which runs, “Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence” (p. 285). In this respect, in order to find the equilibrium, WADA should be more concerned with the approaches underlining anti-doping principles in regard to the privacy principles. To follow the principles of dignity, the WADA agency should refers to the analysis of civil rights and its influence on developing power and support for the athletes. This principle is important because it restores confidence in the organization’s potential to protect rights of individuals. As Houlihan (2004) states, “The generally low levels of trust, co-operation and compatibility between policy makers left loopholes for drug abusing athletes…in the anti-doping regime which was increasingly perceived as poorly managed and reliant upon dubious science” (p. 421). Therefore, WADA’s work should be oriented on providing opportunities for athletes to regain their confidence in the organization’s efficient management and promotion of civil rights. Athletes should, first of all, regarded as individuals possessing a set of rights and principles that allow them to freely choose the sports they would like be involved. Principles of freedom and privacy are also included into evaluation of the dignity principles that is presented in WADA’s code (Hard 2010). According to Tamburrini (2007), the agency successfully meets all ethical criteria and fulfils the dignity principle. Nevertheless, there are some issues that violate athletes’ privacy rights. The major task of the WADA’s code is to uncover the case of drug use, but not to give the personal issues of athletes to publicity. In other words, anti-doping strategies should not contradict the purpose of sport. Not sure if you can write a paper on The World Anti-Doping Agency by yourself? We can help you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More With regard to the above-presented criticism of WADA’s regulatory regime, it should be stated that the implemented anti-doping policies fully adhere to the chosen ethical principles, except for several issues. In particular, the organization should pay closer attention to transparent reporting about cases of drug abuse, excluding the commercial purposes. Second, the code should not prioritize government’s purposes to improve sports performance in the country. Rather, they should be more focused on the welfare and privacy issues. Protecting civil rights and equality principles is the basic requirement to improve the current situation. Finally, WADA must pay attention to the equality principle in terms of athletes’ competition. In this respect, cultural and social backgrounds must be analysed to avoid conflicts and adhere to the moral principles. Athletes should feel equal treatment and trustful atmosphere during competition. Reference List Halt, J 2009, ‘Where is the Privacy in WADA’s “Whereabouts” Rule?’, Marquette Sports Law Review, vol. 20, no. 1. pp. 267-289. Hanstad, DV, Smith , A, and Waddington, I 2008, ‘Type Your Reference List in Alphabetical Order Below’, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, vol. 43, no. 3, pp 227-249. Hard, M. (2010). Caught In The Net: Athletes’ Rights And The World Antidoping Agency. Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal, 19(3), 533-564. Hemphill, D 2009, ‘Performance Enhancement and Drug Control in Sports: Ethical Considerations’, Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, vol. 12, no. 3, pp. 313-326. Houlihan, B 2004, ‘Civil Rights, Doping Control and the World Anti-Doping Code’, Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, vol. 7., no. 3, pp. 420-437. Park, J-K 2005, ‘Governing Doped Bodies: The World Anti-Doping Agency and the Global Culture of Surveillance’, Cultural Studies, Critical Methodologies, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 174-188. Slugget, B 2011, ‘Sport’s Doping Game: Surveillance in the Biotech Age’, Sociology Of Sport Journal, 28, 4, pp. 387-403. Tamburrini, C 2007, ‘Are Doping Sanctions Justified? A Moral Relativistic View’, Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 199-211. Essay /100 Clear Fail Needs Work Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction Structure Introduction There is no introduction. The introduction: Has no clear thesis statement OR The thesis statement is not related to the essay question and Does not outline the main points that support your position. The introduction: Has a thesis statement and Outlines the main points that support your position but may or may not be in the correct order. The introduction: Has a thesis statement Outlines the main points that support your position but may or may not be in the correct order and Has a few general statements related to the topic. The introduction: Has a clear thesis statement that relates back to the question Outlines the main points that support your position in the correct order and Has a few general statements about the topic. The introduction: Has a clear thesis statement that relates back to the question Outlines the main points that support your position in the correct order and Has a few general statements about the topic that clarifies your interpretation of the question. /10 0 0.5-4.5 5.0-6.0 6.5-7.0 7.5-8.0 8.5-10 Arguments, structure and Cohesion The arguments are not relevant to the essay question and do not support the thesis statement or The paragraphs are not well structured and The sequence does not match the outline in the introduction. The arguments are somewhat relevant to the essay question but do not support the thesis statement and The paragraphs are not well structured and The sequence does not match the outline in the introduction. The arguments are relevant to the essay question but may not support the thesis statement Some paragraphs are structured well but may or may not have a single topic. Some paragraphs are linked and The sequence may or may not match the outline in the introduction. The arguments are mostly relevant to the essay question and somewhat support the thesis statement Each paragraph is usually structured well with one topic and concluding sentence. Most paragraphs are clearly linked and The sequence matches the outline in the introduction. The arguments are relevant to the essay question and mostly support the thesis statement Each paragraph is structured well with one topic and concluding sentence. Most paragraphs and ideas are clearly linked and The sequence matches the outline in the introduction. The arguments are highly relevant to the essay question and support the thesis statement Each paragraph is structured well with one topic and concluding sentence which links back to the thesis statement. All paragraphs and ideas are effectively linked and The sequence matches the outline in the introduction. /25 0-7.0 7.5-12.0 12.5-16.0 16.5-18.5 19.0-21.0 21.5-25 Use of evidence There is no supporting evidence for the arguments presented. The evidence that is presented: Does not incorporate at least 3 of the required readings Is limited and Is a descriptive summary. The evidence that is presented: Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings Supports the arguments but Is a descriptive summary. The evidence that is presented: Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings Supports the arguments Elaborates on its relevance and Uses descriptive ethics. The evidence that is presented: Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings Supports the arguments Elaborates on its relevance and Uses descriptive and analytical ethics. The evidence that is presented: Incorporates at least 3 of the required readings Supports the arguments from a number of perspectives Evaluates relevance and Uses descriptive, analytical and normative ethics. /20 0-5.5 6.0-9.5 10.0-12.5 13.0-14.5 15.0-16.5 17.0-20 Conclusion There is no conclusion. The conclusion: Summarises some of the information presented in the body but Does not restate the thesis statement. The conclusion: Summarises some of the information presented in the body and Restates the thesis statement. The conclusion: Summarises some of the main arguments in the body of the essay and Restates the thesis statement. The conclusion: Summarises most of the main arguments in the body of the essay and Restates the thesis statement. The conclusion: Summarises all the main arguments in the body of the essay; Restates the thesis statement and Makes a final comment without introducing new ideas. /10 0 .5-4.5 5.0-6.0 6.5-7.0 7.5-8.0 8.5-10 Academic writing style Does not use: Objective and subjective language appropriately Connections between ideas and sentences AND Formal academic writing. Does not use: Objective and subjective language appropriately Connections between ideas and sentences or Formal academic writing. May or may not use: Objective and subjective language appropriately Connections between ideas and sentences and/or Formal academic writing. Sometimes uses: Objective and subjective language appropriately Clear and logical connections between ideas and sentences and/or Formal academic writing. Mostly uses: Objective and subjective language appropriately Concise and formal ideas Clear and logical connections between ideas and sentences and/or Formal academic writing. Always uses: Objective and subjective language appropriately Concise and formal ideas Clear and logical connections between ideas and sentences and Formal academic writing. /5 0-1.0 1.5-2.0 2.5-3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5-5.0 Referencing In-text citation Few or no resources are acknowledged OR Do not follow the Harvard system OR Uses direct quotes excessively. Some resources are acknowledged May or may not follow the Harvard system OR Uses too many direct quotes. Most resources are acknowledged but Do not accurately follow the Harvard system and May or may not use too many direct quotes. Most resources are acknowledged Accurately follow the Harvard system and May or may not use too many direct quotes. All resources are acknowledged but Do not accurately follow the Harvard system and Quotes minimally and appropriately. All resources are acknowledged Accurately follow the Harvard system and Uses own words. /10 0-2.5 3.0-4.5 5.0-6.0 6.5-7.0 7.5-8.0 8.5-10 Reference list There are less than 6 scholarly references and Most references are not in the body of the essay or It is not in Harvard style. There are less than 6 scholarly references OR Most references are not in the body of the essay and It is not in Harvard style. There are at least 6 scholarly references Most references are cited in the body of the essay and It is in Harvard style. There are at least 7-9 scholarly references Most references are cited in the body of the essay and/or The Harvard style is good. There are 10 scholarly references Most references are cited in the body of the essay and/or The Harvard style is near perfect. There are 10 scholarly references All references are cited in the body of the essay and The Harvard style is perfect. /10 0-2.5 3.0-4.5 5.0-6.0 6.5-7.0 7.5-8.0 8.5-10 Grammar and presentation Spelling, grammar

Hypnotic transcript

Hypnotic transcript.

Create an induction to treat a specific problem and write a transcript of a hypothetical hypnosis session with your commentary and analysis of the process. Explain why you made the specific interventions and the rationale for the particular words and approach that you used. This should reflect knowledge gained from this course and a synthesis of the course concepts. You are required to utilize the internet and University Virtual Library to access current research to support your analysis for this Final Project. Select a minimum of eight (8) current research articles* taken from scholarly journals (online or hard copy) on your selected topic. You may use the bibliography located in the Resource section of your syllabus This assignment MUST be typed, double-spaced, in APA style, and must be written at graduate-level EnglishThe length of this assignment is 10-12 pages plus a title and reference page***Need to be an actual transcript
Hypnotic transcript

issc351: paper outline

essay writer free issc351: paper outline. I’m studying for my Programming class and don’t understand how to answer this. Can you help me study?

Submit a one page outline with your proposed term paper title, thesis statement, and an outline of the subtopics you will cover in your paper.
APA style
you can pick the computer related crime which can be solved by using computer forensics.
Information on the Term Paper:
you must write a 4-6 page term paper on a computer related
crime which can be solved by using computer forensics. You must detail
the procedures used in discovering and investigating the evidence.
Discuss the case, the investigation process, data recovery,
securing the evidence and chain of custody. Remember to explain the
types of software you would use to complete the case. You may use the
cases noted in the book for guidance or may use one of your own. When
writing the term paper you must have a minimum of 3-5 outside sources
cited and referenced using APA Style formatting in the paper
issc351: paper outline

Wk 8 Ch 12 Using Technology for Documentation of Dramatic Play Questions

Wk 8 Ch 12 Using Technology for Documentation of Dramatic Play Questions.

I’m working on a social science discussion question and need an explanation to help me understand better.

Week 8- Chapter 12 DiscussionAfter reading Chapter 12 “Using Technology for Documentation of Dramatic Play” I know you will have a better understanding of dramatic play and how that can be documented using technology.You will have one topic but it has multiple parts. You must discuss all. Topic 1:Discuss your reaction to this chapter. What information stood out to you? Give page number.Did you learn something you didn’t know before? Give page number.Name your favorite thing overall about this chapter. Your least favorite? Provide page number.If you could change/add something about the chapter what would it be and why?What did one new fact you learn from reading this chapter? What part of this chapter inspired you in some way? Explain.Describe/write how you will the knowledge gained from this chapterWhat specific skills do you think you have gained from this chapter? (Be specific)You know the drill…. include materials from the textbooks or other pertinent sources to support your discussion. In your discussion, you must include at least 1 piece of materials per topic. In each of your responses, you must include at least 1 piece to support your response.
Wk 8 Ch 12 Using Technology for Documentation of Dramatic Play Questions

Citizens National Bank Searches For System Solution

In the information system world, before a problem can be solved, it first must be properly defined. Members of the organization must agree that a problem actually exists and that it is serious. The problem must be investigated so that it can be better understood. Next comes a period of devising alternative solutions, then one of evaluating each alternative and selecting the best solution. The final stage is one of implementing the solution, in which a detailed design for the solution is specified, translated into a physical system, tested, introduced to the organization, and further refined as it is used over time. Unfortunately, the same mistakes happen again and again when organizations decide to embrace a new information system either as a solution to a problem or set of problems the organization perceives it is facing, or a management realization that the organization should take advantage of new opportunities to perform more effectively. These mistakes occur repeatedly due to the lack of a thorough system analysis which includes a feasibility study to determine whether each proposed solution is feasible, or achievable, from a financial, technical, and organizational standpoint. The importance of system analysis, information requirements, and feasibility study come of their advantages in determining whether each alternative solution is a good investment, whether the technology needed for the system is available and can be handled by the firm’s information systems staff, and whether the organization is capable of accommodating the changes introduced by the system. Customer relationship management systems are very popular information systems nowadays and have been hailed as a way for companies to find, influence, and retain customers, even though industry experts cite failure rates for CRM rollouts of up to 70 percent. That’s a disastrously high figure for initiatives that typically cost hundreds of thousands–or even millions–of dollars. Most often the complexity of CRM systems can turn deployments into expensive, time-consuming mistakes when companies embrace a complete CRM package from well known vendors like SAP, or Seibel while they need only low-cost, easy-to-implement CRM software with some common CRM features like lead generation and management, deal tracking, and customer support management. “Citizens National Bank searches for a system solution” will be my main discussion in this case study which I think depicts a simple example of organizations that underestimate the importance of a thorough assessment to business processes and a deep analysis to the projected information system to define the requirements of the new system, available alternatives, and comparing multiple selection criteria in order to choose the best available solution which capable of performing the required tasks, satisfy users’ needs, and compatible with the organization’s legacy systems. Singleton Needs a CRM Package The initial problem that Mark Singleton was trying to resolve is the implementation of a CRM system to increase sales by raising the number of contacts relationship bankers were making and improving the tracking of these activities so that the bank could learn more from them. Also Singleton wanted a CRM system that places a great value on the person-to-person interactions between his relationship bankers and their customers and doesn’t interfere with those interactions and diminishes the relationship bankers’ rapport with customers. (Lauden, 2010) In the problem-solving process which is especially valuable when we need to build new systems as a solution to a problem or set of problems the organization perceives it is facing. The problem in this case came from the management realization that the organization should take advantage of new opportunities to perform more effectively, but they didn’t apply the four steps of problem solving. In the problem-solving process to system building, we would need to take the following four steps: (Lauden, 2010) (1) Define and understand the problem. (2) Develop alternative solutions. (3) Choose the best solution. (4) Implement the solution. Citizens National Bank CEO Mark Singleton achieved the first step with an outstanding performance in defining and understanding the problem for which they need to build a new system but he failed dramatically in applying the rest of the steps required by the problem-solving process to build a new system. Mr. Singleton did not devise, develop or try several alternative solutions before opting for a new CRM system to solve the problem of paper and manual work and replace it with a new information system to automate some of the bankers’ tasks. Because he did not develop alternative solutions, he couldn’t choose the best solution which led to a failed implementation at the first time. Figure : Problem Solving Process Source: Lauden, Management Information Systems New System Implementation! Its Tangible and Intangible Benefits Organizationally, Citizens National Bank of Texas is a private, full-service bank with headquarters in Waxahachie, Texas, and 200 employees that has operated independently since 1868. Citizens National Bank relies on personal, retail, and commercial customers and serves businesses and consumers in Ellis County and other nearby counties, primarily in communities with populations of 25,000 or less. (Lauden, 2010) Citizen National bank operates heavily manual and count on paper system in which sometimes a salesperson that left Citizens National could take records of customer interaction with him or her, leaving the bank with no information to maintain the relationship. The paper system also created too much information for Singleton and his branch managers to process effectively. So that the old paper system cannot support the large number of new customers and the annual grow at a rate of 12 percent. (Lauden, 2010) A major part of Citizen National’s strategy for continuing growth was to implement customer relationship management (CRM) software. The CRM strategy targeted the bank’s two main contact points with customers: the bank’s call center and its sales force. The objectives of a solution for Citizens National Bank would be to reduce the amount of time, effort, and errors in the tracking of activities made by relationship bankers and to increase sales by raising the number of contacts relationship bankers were making and improving the tracking of these activities so that the bank could learn more from them. (Lauden, 2010) Tangible Benefits Increased productivity: Using a CRM system will enable relationship bankers to improve their tracking activities with customers, which in turn increase their productivity and give them ability to serve more customers. Lower operational costs: using electronic records will substantially reduce papers used and results in cost saving. Reduced workforce: this is will be the result of increasing bankers’ productivity to serve more customers, which in turn will considerably reduce the workforce required to handle the projected increase in sales. Reduced rate of growth in expenses Reduced facility costs: due to paper reduction, and workforce reduction. Intangible Benefits Improved organizational planning and flexibility: because the paper system created too much information for Singleton and his branch managers to process effectively. The CRM system will give them efficient information to make effective decisions. Improved decision making: having accurate information under executives and managers control will dramatically enhance the decision making. Improved operations: The CRM system will enable the bank to approve credit and loan applications more quickly. Improved asset utilization and improved resource control. More information available in a timely manner. Enhanced employee goodwill: because under the old paper system, a salesperson that left Citizens National could take records of customer interaction with him or her, leaving the bank with no information to maintain the relationship. Increased job satisfaction among employees. Higher client satisfaction: nothing will satisfy the customers more than getting a quick approvals and smooth transactions. Better corporate image: this is will result automatically from an increase in job satisfaction among employees and a higher client satisfaction. Why didn’t the implementation of the Siebel CRM solution work out I believe that the implementation of the Siebel CRM solution didn’t work out for Citizens National because it was not the best solution that applies or fits into the defined problem; it didn’t work out because it was not a result of a thorough selection process that went through precise evaluation for multiple alternatives or solutions. The implementation failed for many factors, I will classify these factors in terms of organization, technology, and people issues Organization: the approach of Citizens National toward nearly all business functions, from tracking customer leads to generating reports about them, was very basic. The Siebel software was simply too rich in features. (Lauden, 2010) “From the start, Citizens National had trouble getting the software to fit its rather straightforward, basic customer-lead tracking and reporting needs.”With Siebel, we were spending way too much time turning off capabilities that we didn’t need,” Singleton explains. An example of functionality that didn’t fit Citizens National’s business model was Siebel’s capability for setting up customer support cases. While some large corporations may want to set up a support case with detailed complaint-tracking and resolution functions, the small bank had no use for it. Service complaints that come in to Citizens National are handled on the spot by its call center. For service inquiries that require a follow-up, such as a customer asking about the reordering of checks, the call-center representative schedules an activity by sending an e-mail to the employee who handles check orders.” (Bartholomew, 2007) People: Employees found the software to be too complicated. They were surprised to learn, for example, that the system did not automatically generate potential business opportunities for customers on their records. Furthermore, bankers were not able to view multiple relationships between a customer and the bank on the same screen. The extra navigation was confusing and inefficient. (Lauden, 2010) The relationship bankers were the key employees; the system was intended to be of value to them, and, in turn, provide value to the bank. However, they found no incentive in the Siebel environment because their compensation was based on sales, and sales had become harder to make. Citizens National’s bankers found the system difficult to navigate. For instance, the banking representatives couldn’t understand why an opportunity to make a loan to a particular customer wasn’t listed under the customer’s record. “You have to assign that opportunity to that person,” explains Doug Furney, president and CEO of The Small Business Solution. “If you don’t make those relationships when entering the data, the opportunity won’t appear under that customer’s record. Not everyone easily grasped this concept.” (Bartholomew, 2007) Furney says the way the screens were laid out in Siebel, Citizens’ bankers had to flip back and forth between the various screens to identify different relationships that customers had with the bank. “Understanding these relationships in the system was very confusing to their bankers,” he says. As a result, the bank’s top sales representatives, who weren’t eager to change the way they did their work to fit the needs of the software, found Siebel’s learning curve too steep to negotiate. “Citizens National’s 16 relationship bankers never got over the ease-of-use problems that Siebel presented,” Furney says. (Bartholomew, 2007) Technology: Citizens National experienced compatibility issues between the database formats in Siebel and those used by the bank’s core banking application, developed by Kirchman. As a result, the two systems had difficulty exchanging information properly. The bank was forced to spend a significant amount of time fixing such compatibility issues, which negatively impacted its ability to serve customers. (Lauden, 2010) Citizens National also had to deal with a raft of customization issues, often stemming from the differences between databases. Furney worked to integrate Siebel with Citizens National’s core banking application. The bank uses banking software from Kirchman, whose vertical systems are used by numerous small and medium-size banks to process and track customers’ deposits, loans and trust accounts. “Trying to get these two systems to talk was a challenge,” he says. (Bartholomew, 2007) One basic difference was the way the core banking application set up its customer data fields. The Kirchman system did not have individual fields for both the customer’s first and last names, choosing instead to include the full name in a single field. By contrast, in Siebel, the customer’s first and last name each had a data field. “That’s the kind of thing we ran into when we tried to marry data from these two different systems,” Furney says. “This kind of integration takes time, and customers don’t realize how much time is required.” (Bartholomew, 2007) Was QuickBase a better solution for Citizens National In my perspective, QuickBase was the best alternative solution that meets the requirements of Citizens National Bank for a new IT system that is an easy to use, capable of doing some tracking activities, and store the interactions between relationship bankers and their customers and doesn’t interfere with those interactions and diminish the relationship bankers’ rapport with customers. QuickBase was designed for organizing, tracking, and sharing information among team members in the workplace while encouraging progress by notifying workers via automated e-mails of updated files, new task assignments, and approaching deadlines. Because QuickBase was not programmed as a specific business application, businesses could modify its database structure to meet specific business functions. (Lauden, 2010) One reason some small and medium-size companies, as well as groups within larger ones, are adopting QuickBase is its flexibility. Intended not just for customer management, QuickBase-which is actually more of an easily modified database than a full-fledged business application-can be harnessed for other business tasks. For example, Procter

Essay Writing at Online Custom Essay

5.0 rating based on 10,001 ratings

Rated 4.9/5
10001 review

Review This Service




Rating: