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The University of Texas at Arlington Legislation Tracking Reflection

The University of Texas at Arlington Legislation Tracking Reflection.

I’m working on a humanities multi-part question and need support to help me study.

Find a new piece of legislation proposed at the state or federal level related to children or family policies and follow its progress throughout the semester.Fill out the Legislation Tracking Document (attached below)Submit a reflection of between 500 to 800 words in which you describe why you chose this legislation and why you believe it is related to children and family, whether you agree with the proposed legislation or not and why, and what amendments, if any, you would make to improve the legislation. Use what you have learned in the course. You do not need to conduct additional research.
The University of Texas at Arlington Legislation Tracking Reflection

Practices for Adult Learners, Conclusion

Practices for Adult Learners, Conclusion.

Create the Practices for Adult Learners section and discuss each of the following:Discuss adult English as Second Language (ESL) Education and its relationship to selecting the appropriate teaching methods. Choose two or three practices for adult learners that are appropriate for adult ESL education and discuss each one. Address learning goals, teaching methods, evaluation strategies, teaching materials and technology needed for effectively teaching adult learners in the instructional plan to support Adult ESL education. Reflect how Adult ESL education may relate to the learning styles of the adult learner, the teaching style of the instructor, the content to be taught, and the setting in which the teaching/learning occurs. This section answers the question: Considering Adult ESL education, how will I present my content to adult learners effectively?2. Create the Conclusion section within your Final Project APA styled paper A good conclusion restates the purpose statement (Purpose statement…. to explore how to effectively teach an ESL student with a focus on contemporary practices, adult learning theories and models, adult cognitive development, and teaching methods and practices suitable for an ESL student) and summarizes the basic elements of the paper.This section should be approximately ½ page long.3. Create the reference page that adheres to APA format.
Practices for Adult Learners, Conclusion

Brookdale Community College Criminal Justice Laws for Underage Drinking Discussion

essay order Brookdale Community College Criminal Justice Laws for Underage Drinking Discussion.

Instructions: Please read the Illinois Youthful Intoxicated Drivers’ Visitation Program law. After reading the statute, answer the questions below.Zero Tolerance Law for Underage DrinkingAll 50 states and the District of Columbia have zero-tolerance laws for drivers under age 21.Section 628 ILCS 5/11-501.7 Youthful Intoxicated Drivers’ Visitation Program(a) As a condition of probation or discharge of a person convicted of a violation of Section 11-501 (Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Alcohol and/or Drugs) of this Code, who was less than 21 years of age at the time of the offense, or a person adjudicated delinquent pursuant to the Juvenile Court Act, for violation of Section 11-501 of this Code, the Court may order the offender to participate in the Youthful Intoxicated Drivers’ Visitation Program. The Program shall consist of a supervised visitation as provided by this Section by the person to at least one of the following, to the extent that personnel and facilities are available:A State or private rehabilitation facility that cares for victims of motor vehicle accidents involving persons under the influence of alcohol.A facility which cares for advanced alcoholics to observe persons in the terminal stages of alcoholism, under the supervision of appropriately licensed medical personnel.If approved by the coroner of the county where the person resides, the county coroner’s office or the county morgue to observe appropriate victims of motor vehicle accidents involving persons under the influence of alcohol, under the supervision of the coroner or deputy coroner.(b) The Program shall be operated by the appropriate probation authorities of the courts of the various circuits. The youthful offender ordered to participate in the Program shall bear all costs associated with participation in the Program. A parent or guardian of the offender may assume the obligation of the offender to pay the costs of the Program. The court may waive the requirement that the offender pays the costs of participation in the Program upon a finding of indigency.(c) As used in this Section, “appropriate victims” means victims whose condition is determined by the visit supervisor to demonstrate the results of motor vehicle accidents involving persons under the influence of alcohol without being excessively gruesome or traumatic to the observer.(d) Any visitation shall include, before any observation of victims or disabled persons, a comprehensive counseling session with the visitation supervisor at which the supervisor shall explain and discuss the experiences which may be encountered during the visitation in order to ascertain whether the visitation is appropriate.QuestionsGiven what you know about rational choice theory, do you think the Youthful Intoxicated Drivers’ Visitation Program is an effective strategy for dealing with drivers under the age of 21 who are convicted of drunk driving? Explain your answer.What is another policy that you might implement to get underage drivers to think about the potential consequences of drinking and driving? Remember, your policy has to be based on rational choice.Do you think your policy would be more effective than the Youthful Intoxicated Drivers’ Visitation Program? Defend your answer.
Brookdale Community College Criminal Justice Laws for Underage Drinking Discussion

Development of Buildability and Constructability

What is buildability or constructability? Is design for buildability or constructability is approachable? Can buildability concepts and theories enhance designers awareness of construction knowledge and buildability issues and reduce rework and increase construction productivity? , or can it inadvertently limit designer’s creativity? At the heart of this review paper are debates about the potential of buildability concept and the usability of construction knowledge in design to sustain and develop buildable designs. Construction is the world’s largest and most challenging industry [R. L. Tucker, 1986]. In 1997, the US construction industry accounted for 10% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and employed over 10 Million, making the industry the largest in the country [E. Allmon, C. T. Hass, J. D. Borcherding and P. M. Goodrum, 2000]. On the other hand, a 10% increase in construction labour productivity would yield annual savings of about £1 Billion to the British economy [R. M. W. Horner, B. T. Talhouni and H. R. Thomas, ” (1989).]; a similar conclusion was echoed by Stoekel and Quirke [S. Adams, (1989).]. Several factors affect project productivity but, buildability is among the most important [R. M. W. Horner, B. T. Talhouni and H. R. Thomas, 1989)., S. Adams, ” (1989)]. In practice, design and construction processes are normally carried out in a sequential manner. Since 1805 the construction industry has benefited from the various advantages this approach (Dunican, 1984). It allows the different parties in the project to compete and provide the best results for the project while defending and upholding their rights and duties within their respective disciplines (Griffith, 1986). Although the separation of design and construction allows the construction processes to be managed systematically between the various stages and disciplines, the industry is still being criticised for poor performance, being under productive, lack of competitiveness, and consuming longer product development time. Various studies have revealed that since 1950, the construction industry has realised the important of analysing design for construction implications, if the production work on site is to be effectively performed (Gray,1986). To overcome this inherent problems from the separation of design and construction, a concept known as buildability in the UK and constructability in USA is established and ‘marketed’ to the industry (Illingworth, 1984; CIRIA, 1983; NEDO, 1975; Griffith, 1985; Gray, 1983; Moore, 1996). By using the buildability concept as a means to improve the construction industry, many ideas have been put forward by various researchers to remove the disadvantages of separating the design and construction process (Illingworth, 1983; CIRIA, 1983; CII, 1986; Tatum, 1987). The issue of buildability – and academic research in the field for that matter – has been an evolving one over the last three decades; moulded by reaction to changes in the procurement environment and in the case of academic buildability research, to advancements in the science of methodology. Regarding the latter, developing techniques such as neural networks, fuzzy decision making, buildability scores system and 3d/4d technology technologies have witnessed application among a range of assessing buildabilty problems (ref.). This paper will review and synthesise the existing research efforts in order to establish state of the art collective knowledge in relation to buildability problems causes and effects. It aims to create two separate taxonomies, which are comprehensive collections of all project change causes and change effects identified in previous studies. A simple case study is presented to demonstrate how the taxonomies provide a useful framework for construction professionals to manage project changes. However, they are not management tools that can be used directly in practice. Instead, they provide a basis for developing project management solutions and toolkits. While the industry focus of this study is construction, the developed taxonomies can be modified and adopted for other project-based industrial sectors (change). Aim and objectives of this study This backcloth of “evolvement” brings matters conveniently to the focus of this study, the aim of which was to critically appraise academic research within the field of construction buildability, published over a time window of circa 30 years prior to 2011. Objectives related to this aim included particular consideration of: (1) the foci of that research; (2) stated research drivers; (3) favoured methodological approaches; (4) research tools employed; and (5) the products of research effort. Buildability assessment method (6) Buildability attributes Based on observation of outcomes resulting from satisfying these objectives, the contribution of published academic research is considered, and future research direction intimated. The literature review: The principal method for this study is literature review and analysis. A preliminary review found that studies on buildability assessment fall into a broad spectrum, covering buildability problems causes and effects, buildability attributes, as well as assessment methods and techniques. Given the large volume of published work, there was a need to set a limit to the scope of the review. The study was chosen to focus on buildability assessment models and the stages of its implementation, because a good understanding of buildability models is a prerequisite for effective. Such a decision excluded papers from the review. The targeted literature sources are limited to refereed academic journals, published in English. They are a good representation of the breadth and depth of research achievements; and they have been scrutinised through peer review. In recent years, most academic journals began to provide online access. The emergence of a number of publication index databases has greatly assisted the literature search task. As for the date of publication, no explicit restriction was set. However, because few pre 1990s publications were covered by the online index databases the number of papers identified for that period is very small. This will be revealed in the following analyses. Development of buildability and constructability concept: The word buildability appears to have first entered the language in the late nineteen seventies [D. W. Cheetham and J. Lewis, ” (2001).]. Concerns on the disparate phases in building development was raised in the early 1960s when a series of studies, such as Emmerson (1962), Banwell (1964), Tavistock (1965), EDC (1967) and NEDO (1975), were carried out in the UK. The issue of buildability – and academic research in the field for that matter – has been an evolving one over the last three decades; moulded by reaction to changes in the procurement environment and in the case of academic buildability research, to advancements in the science of methodology. Regarding the latter, developing techniques such as neural networks, fuzzy decision making, buildability scores system and 3d/4d technology technologies have witnessed application among a range of assessing buildabilty problems (ref.). To gain a better understanding of buildability problems, especially their causes and effects, has been a long-standing research challenge. Emmerson Report: An early attempt to address buildability can be credited to Sir Harold Emmerson (1962) when he suggested the development of a new form of relationship between designers and constructors. The point of concern was the lack of cohesion between designers and constructors and the inability of both parties to see the whole construction process through each other’s eyes. The report was the first that has emphasised that the inefficiencies in the construction industry stemmed from inadequacies of communications and coordination. The quality of the relationship between the professions and subcontractors was seen as affecting the efficiency of building operations. Emmerson criticised the lack of cohesion existing within the industry. Banwell Report: In the UK, since the Emmerson Report (1962), numerous researches had been carried out to identify the causes of buildability problems and search for solutions for improvement. Banwell 1964 highlighted the fragmented characteristics of the industry and inefficient designs produced by designers deficient in construction knowledge without involvement of contractors. Banwell 1964 suggested that: ‘design and construction must be considered together and that in the traditional contracting situation, the contractor is too far removed from the design stage at which his specialised knowledge and techniques could be put to invaluable use’ The report called for more attention to be given to pre-contract planning and design formulation and criticised professionalism as being narrow sighted, giving rise to unnecessary and inefficient construction practices. It was suggested that: clients define their building requirements clearly at the start of the design stage; the building process should better integrate the stages of design and construction; and that traditional construction practices should be reviewed to seek interdisciplinary approach. A subsequent study (Economic Development Council 1967) reported that the recommendations made in the Banwell Report had not been successfully implemented within the construction industry and that flexible approaches to traditional procedures should be sought and new initiatives developed if meaningful change within the industry was to be achieved. The Wood Report in the mid-1970s (National Economic Development Office 1975) suggested that in the decade following the Emmerson and Banwell reports some improvements had been made in the quest for integrating better the processes of design and construction. In general however, the original problems remained and it was suggested that efforts should be directed towards increasing the level of awareness for the problems and designing measures to bring together the design and construction processes such that the construction stage might directly capitalise on design initiatives. Tavistock: Later, the report of the Tavistock (1965) highlighted that the causes of the communication problems between contracting parties could be attributable to the division of responsibilities and the pattern of relationships. Since then, the need to integrate disparate development phases has triggered a large number of studies in different countries. Griffith: Griffith (1984) suggested inviting construction expertise early at the design stage, using contractual arrangements that facilitate the improvement of buildability. Griffith (1984) further pointed out that the capability of project management embracing suitable procurement approaches would contribute to improved buildability with concomitant benefits for overall project performance. Griffith and Sidwell (1997) also maintained that decisions taken early in a project’s life cycle have greater potential to influence the final outcome of the project, based on the Pareto Principle. Griffith and Sidwell (1997) highlighted that buildability must be considered from the first notional idea suggested by the client, and is quite simply a prerequisite throughout what may be considered to be a staged process. Griffith and Sidwell [17] identified several similar problems, which are lack of consideration on interrelationship between different construction elements and skills required; and less flexibility of design and leeway within design details for materials, components, plants and craft tolerances. Constructability includes number of activities during all project life cycle phases. Griffith

Finance Geometric and arithmetic returns

Finance Geometric and arithmetic returns.

A stock has had the following year-end prices and dividends: Year       Price   Dividend 1   $ 43.15     –   2     48.13   $ 0.45   3     57.05     0.49   4     45.13     0.55   5     52.05     0.62   6     61.13     0.68   What are the arithmetic and geometric returns for the stock? (Round your answers to 2 decimal places. (e.g., 32.16))
Finance Geometric and arithmetic returns

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