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Taking a cue from Joseph V. Mascelli’s, THE FIVE C’S OF CINEMATOGRAPHY, pick one of the five subject areas

Taking a cue from Joseph V. Mascelli’s, THE FIVE C’S OF CINEMATOGRAPHY, pick one of the five subject areas of the five C’s: Camera Angles, Continuity, Cutting, Close- ups, and Composition. Write an essay defining your choice and give specific examples from your personal observations or readings that support your point of view. For example, define composition? How is it used to promote the intended emotional response from the scene? How does composition serve the story? Are there compositional rules? What’s the point of view?
Feel free to discuss the topic, especially drawing from your personal filmmaking experiences.

I want to do home for history

For this second installment of your three-part NACLA Report on the Americas reviews, and for this installment, you are to read a current news article about the Caribbean or Central America from the website for the North American Congress of Latin America (NACLA) and submit a short review. The due date for this review is Friday, February 25. Late reviews will be accepted for one week through March 4, and a one-grade deduction will be assessed.
Please submit your review through Canvas in either of the following formats: doc, docx or PDF (if you are using Google Docs or Apple Pages to compose your review, please be sure to convert your paper to docx or PDF before submitting it). Late papers will be accepted for each submission, but only for one week after the assigned due dates and will be assessed a full grade deduction. Please use both a title page and a works cited page (neither of these pages count toward your 3-4 pages of text). The three NACLA reports that you submit will count as a combined 30% toward your final grade. In your works cited page, compose your article entry in a format like this:
Jennifer A. Cárcamo, “Poets and Prophets of Resistance: Intellectuals and the Origins of El Salvador’s Civil War,” NACLA Report on the Americas website (August 6, 2020).
In terms of the content of each report, I am looking for two main points of discussion. First, you should devote the first half of the report to a summary of the main points in the article that you selected. To help you to address this issue, consider some of these questions: What is the main issue being discussed? (i.e. immigration, elections, education, environment, women’s issues, crime, etc.) Who are the main personalities mentioned in the article? (i.e. El Salvador president Nayib Bukele, President Biden, Secretary of State Blinken, former President Trump, etc.) How does the issue affect the people of the country mentioned in the article? Does the issue have any connection with United States interests? What do you think could be the best solution to resolve this problem?
And for the second point of discussion, please analyze the article that you selected and present your point of view on the story. For example, how do you feel about the story? How did this article contribute to your understanding about modern Latin America? And what do you think about the author’s perspective on the article? How does this topic relate to contemporary political, economic or cultural themes in the United States today?
Here is a list of articles from the NACLA website pertaining to regions for the February 25 due date. Just pick any one article from this list for your February 25 review. You will repeat the same process for your third review, on a South American nation, which is due on March 11. These articles range in date from February 2019 to November 2021. For this list, I’m going in alphabetical order by nation, starting with the Caribbean region first, and then Central America:
The Caribbean
Barbados:
Caribbean Food Sovereignty During Covid-19 (Aug. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Barbuda:
After Irma, Disaster Capitalism Threatens Cultural Heritage in Barbuda (Feb. 2019)(Links to an external site.)

Cuba:
A Ship Adrift: Cuba After the Pink Tide (Apr. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Artists in Cuba Spearhead First Major Protest in Decades (Dec. 2020)

Cuba: An American History Review (Book Review) (Nov. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Cuba Today: Homeland, People, and Sovereignty (July 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Cuban Memory Wars (Book Review) (May 2021) (Links to an external site.)

“Don’t Throw the Sofa out the Window” Discussing Protests in Cuba (Aug. 2021)

For Cuban Artists, Censure is the Norm (Jan. 2022) (Links to an external site.)

(Links to an external site.)

Have You Heard, Comrade? The Socialist Revolution is Racist Too (Aug. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

(Links to an external site.)

J-11 in Cuba (July 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Mi Primera Tarea (Film Review) (Oct. 2020)

On Cuba: Caricatures of the Left and the Absent Cuban People (Oct. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

On Sovereignties and Solidarities (March 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Religious Conservatism is Shaping the Civil Liberties Debate in Cuba (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

The Damaging “Middle Ground” Stance on Cuba (Aug. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

The Right to Live in Health and Cuban Health Care: The Ongoing Revolution (Book Review) (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

The War on Cuba Documentary Tells the Story of the U.S. Embargo (Dec. 2020)

Using Cuba’s Protests as a Chance to Denounce the Left (Aug. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Why Trump’s Cuba Policy is So Wrong (May 2019)

With Cubans Speaking Out, How Will the Left Respond? (July 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Dominican Republic:
Checkpoint Nation (March 2019)

“I Am the Darker Brother”: Michèle Stephenson’s “Stateless” Documentary (Apr. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Post-Electoral Crisis in the Dominican Republic (Interview) (March 2020) (Links to an external site.)

The Right’s Continued Dominance in the Dominican Republic (Jan. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Haiti:
A Young Duvalier and Haiti’s Unremembered Past (Feb. 2019)

After Moïse Assassination, Popular Sectors Must Lead the Way (July 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Behind the Covid Numbers in Haiti (June 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Building Corruption in Haiti (May 2019)

Fighting for Survival, Building for Power (Apr. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Haiti at the Crossroads (March 2019)

Haiti’s Earthquakes Require a Haitian Solution (Aug. 2021)

Remembering Joane Florvil, Victim of Global Anti-Blackness (Sept. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

The Foreign Roots of Haiti’s “Constitutional Crisis” (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

(Links to an external site.)

The Political Anatomy of Haiti’s Armed Gangs (Apr. 2021)

To Save Haitian Lives, Global Health Leaders Call for Solidarity (Dec. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Jamaica:
Rethinking Sargassum Seaweed: Could It Be the New Normal in Jamaica? (March 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico:
A Disastrous Methane Gas Scheme Threatens Puerto Rico’s Energy Future (June 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Adjunct Faculty in an Adjunct Country (Aug. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Celebrating 50 Years of El Comité-MINP (Jan. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Doing Reggaetón However He Wants: Bad Bunny’s YHLQMDLG (Music Review) (March 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Mutual Aid and Survival as Resistance in Puerto Rico (Aug. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Policing is the Crisis (May 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rican People’s Assemblies Shift from Protest to Proposal (Aug. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico 2021: A Shift in Perspective, A New Opposition (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico’s Seismic Shocks (Jan. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico and the Perpetual State of Emergency (Aug. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Step by Powerful Step, Citizens Lead Puerto Rico into Its Solar Future (Sept. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

The Anti-Corruption Code for the New Puerto Rico (May 2019)

The Devastating Costs of Puerto Rico’s Solar “Farms” (Feb. 2022) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

The Protests in Puerto Rico Are About Life and Death (July 2019) (Links to an external site.)

The Summer 2019 Uprising: Building a New Puerto Rico (Oct. 2019)

To My Fellow BoriBlancos: When We Say “Down with White Power,” We Also Mean Our White Power (Oct. 2020)

Toxic Racism in Puerto Rico’s Sacrifice Zone (Sept. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Where is the State of Emergency? (June 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Trinidad and Tobago:
Toppling the Colonizers in Trinidad and Tobago (June 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Central America
Belize
In Belize, a Win for Black Dockworkers (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Costa Rica:
Costa Rica: A Democracy on the Brink (Dec. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Costa Rica’s Covid-19 Response Scapegoats Nicaraguan Migrants (July 2020) (Links to an external site.)

El Salvador:
100 Days of Nayib Bukele in El Salvador: Social Movement Perspectives (Interview) (Sept. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Alejandro Molina Lara Fought for Workers’ Rights in El Salvador and the United States (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Building a Church of the Poor (Dec. 2020)

Bukele Responds to Avalanche of International Criticism: “The People Voted for This” (May 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Confronting Internal Forced Displacement in El Salvador (Feb. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Death by Deportation, With Help From the Human Rights Establishment (March 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Deportation Contagions (March 2020) (Links to an external site.)

El Bukelazo: Shades of Dictatorship in El Salvador (Feb. 2020)

El Salvador President Nayib Bukele Has Blood on His Hands (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

El Salvador’s Backslide (Feb. 2019)

Left Out of Bukele’s Bitcoin Decision, Salvadorans Face Deepening Inequality (July 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Poets and Prophets of Resistance: Intellectuals and the Origins of El Salvador’s Civil War (Book Review) (Aug. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

The Hollywood Kid: The Violent Life and Violent Death of an MS-13 Hitman (Book Review) (Nov. 2019)

The Value of a Volcano (Nov. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Underreported and Unpunished, Femicides in El Salvador Continue (March 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Guatemala:
25 Years After the Peace Accords, Democracy Weak in Guatemala (Jan. 2022) (Links to an external site.)

A Dispatch From the Caravan (Feb. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

A Victory for Guatemala’s Pacto de Corruptos (June 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Defending Consultation: Indigenous Resistance Against the Escobal Mine in Guatemala (May 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Democracy in Crisis in Guatemala (June 2019)

Dianna Ortiz, Survivor and Witness of the Guatemalan Genocide (1958-2021) (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Guatemala: Impunity for War Criminals, Again (Feb. 2019)

Guatemala Cracks Down on Q’eqchi’ Resistance in El Estor (Nov. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Guatemala on Trial: Maya Land Rights Case Reaches International Court (Feb. 2022) (Links to an external site.)

Guatemala’s National Strike Demands Structural Change (Sept. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Guatemalan Child Refugees, Then and Now (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Guatemalans Have Had Enough (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

“History Moves Forward. You Cannot Go Back:” An Interview with Judge Yassmín Barrios (May 2019)

Historical Memory in the Digital Age (June 2021)

In Guatemala, Ex-Paramilitaries Face Trial for Wartime Rape of Indigenous Women (Jan. 2022) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

(Links to an external site.)

In Guatemala, Finding a Voice in Indigenous Community Radio (July 2019) (Links to an external site.)

In Guatemala, Out with the Old, In with the Older (Aug. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

In Guatemala, Resignations are Not Enough (Dec. 2020)

In Guatemala, Will Old Foreign Policies Bring New Results? (Aug. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Indigenous Guatemalan Journalist Faces Charges after Reporting on Protest (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Is Guatemala a “Safe Third Country” for Disposable People? (Aug. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Officials Conceal Conditions at Guatemala Mental Health Hospital During Pandemic (June 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Remembering Guatemala’s Martyr of Justice: An Interview with Francisco Goldman (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Sex Workers Unionize in Guatemala (Feb. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

Talking Like a Mining Company: The Escobal Mine in Guatemala (Oct. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

The Garífuna Voices of Guatemala’s Armed Conflict (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

U.S. Archeologist Seeks to Privatize Maya Historic Sites in the Name of Conservation (Aug. 2020)

“We Are Here by Force”: Maya Ixil Activists Fight for Asylum and Justice (May 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

White Flags as Guatemalans Grow Hungry (May 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Honduras:
A Private Government in Honduras Moves Forward (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

A State of Mistrust (Nov. 2020)

Arbitrary Justice: The Fate of Environmental Defenders in Honduras (Sept. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Climate Change Haunts a Ghostly Border in Honduras (Nov. 2020)

Combating Narcos or Criminalizing Indigeneity? (Jan. 2022) (Links to an external site.)https://nacla.org/combating-narcos-or-criminalizin… (Links to an external site.)

For Murdered Honduran Organizer Berta Cáceres, “Any Injustice Was Her Battle” (June 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Garífuna Community Demands Return of Kidnapped Leaders (July 2020)

Hondurans in the U.S. Fear Vote Suppression in Sunday Elections (Nov. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Honduras a Decade after the Coup: An Interview with Luis Méndez (June 2019)

Honduras: Between the Old Elite and a New Democracy (Nov. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

In Honduras, Victory of Leftist Woman President Rests on Other Women’s Struggles (Jan. 2022) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)

Political Prisoners Released as Government’s Legitimacy Crumbles in Honduras (Interview) (Sept. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

The Flame of Opposition in Honduras (Sept. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

The Roots of the National Strike in Honduras: An Interview with Bayron Rodríguez Pineda (June 2019) (Links to an external site.)

U.S. Violence Prevention in Honduras: Help or Hypocrisy? (March 2020)

United States Struggles to Pick a Side in Upcoming Honduran Elections (Sept. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Verdict Forthcoming for Military Intelligence Officer in Murder of Berta Cáceres (July 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Who Killed Berta Cáceres (Book Review) (June 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Nicaragua:
Crisis in Nicaragua: Is the Ortega-Murillo Government Leftist? (Part I) (Aug. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Deciphering Nicaragua’s Tepid Covid Response (June 2020)

LGBTQ Resistance and Political Protest in Nicaragua (Sept. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Nicaragua: Chronicle of an Election Foretold (Nov. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Nicaragua’s Elections Are a Referendum on Social Investment Policies (Nov. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Ortega’s Developmentalism Is Based on the “Popular Economy”—But What Does that Mean? (Dec. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Ortega’s World, the Flesh and the Gold (Dec. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Sanctions May Impoverish Nicaraguans, but Likely Will Not Change their Vote (Aug. 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

The Anti-Sandinista Youth of Nicaragua (Feb. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

The Sandinista Labor Paradox (Sept. 2019) (Links to an external site.)

The Youth Leading Nicaragua’s Uprising, One Year Later (Apr. 2019)

Why Did Daniel Ortega Imprison His Former Comrades? (June 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Panama:
A Perilous Journey Along the Darién Gap (Oct. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

After Landmark Territorial Win, Naso People of Panama Look to the Future (Feb. 2021)

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HTM310 Health Informatics

Taking a cue from Joseph V. Mascelli’s, THE FIVE C’S OF CINEMATOGRAPHY, pick one of the five subject areas Electronic Health Records (EHRs)
The United States is investing heavily in electronic health records

and communication systems. Based on the course readings and videos, as

well as any professional work experience with these systems, discuss

the value of these systems in practice today for health care

professionals. In addition, describe your experience taking the

electronic health record (EHR) system / sim lab for a hands-on test

drive. Was this the first time using a system for patient care

information? If so, simply describe the use of this system. If you have

used other similar systems, also please share a few words on your

experiences in addition to a review of the sim lab. The goal here is to

show evidence that you have invested some time in the sim lab and have a

basic understanding of practical hands-on EHR systems used in practice

today.

Humanities Question

Robert Ryman’s recent work is almost always white: white background and foreground with little or nothing to disturb the square canvases. However, he emphasizes that the attachments to the walls, framing (if any), and the (hopefully) natural lighting and the way it can change during the day all are a part of experiencing his works. The assignment: Using references and passages within “Shades of White” in The New Yorker Magazine, and any information from our viewings and readings—identifying them specifically by name–explain why you believe Ryman’s works are both paintings and works of art, OR why they are not, OR why they fit some definitions of painting, creativity and/or art, but do not fulfill others.You may use ANY works we have read or viewed as part of our classwork. DO identify and credit information and quotations you use. Limit your introduction to no more than 20% of your word count.Minimum word count: 700 words.
shades-of-white
watch
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Air Quality Control & Protection Paper

Air Quality Control & Protection Paper.

 Description Air Quality Paper Scenario Temperature Inversion: In the winter months in a small town located in a valley, a temperature inversion has occurred. An inversion is a change the normal atmosphere where a layer of cool air at the surface is overlain by a layer of warmer air, therefore limiting the ability for air at the bottom to escape. An inversion can lead to pollution and contaminates being trapped close to the ground, with possible adverse effects on health. >Describe the air quality incident and highlight the unique attributes of this situation and why it is a public health concern. Explain the situational background and why a public health response would be warranted. >Describe the potential human health effects of this incident, taking into account the unique environmental health factors that influence exposure. What challenges/barriers can you expect to face given this information? >Analyze the core public health roles and responsibilities in responding to the event and how local, state and federal public health agencies may work together in controlling the air quality incident. Also, what other resources and/or partnerships may be needed to respond to this incident? >Describe the specific public health and community protection procedures that you feel will best protect the community and why? Make sure to discuss at minimum, incident investigation, exposure assessment, hazard containment, and public information dissemination. >Provide a summary/conclusion adequately closing the paper and finalizing your thoughts on how these measures contribute to positive social change.

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Articles related to the Coolest Cooler: What impact did the delay of the delivery of coolers have on other aspects of the project and/or company?

Articles related to the Coolest Cooler: What impact did the delay of the delivery of coolers have on other aspects of the project and/or company?.

Review the following articles related to the Coolest Cooler. Write 3-4 pages outlining issues and potential remediation steps that could have gotten this project back on track. Answer the following questions specifically: – When did the project schedule get off track? Why? – Who is responsible for the project schedule? – What impact did the delay of the delivery of coolers have on other aspects of the project and/or company? – If you could go back in time, would you fund the kickstarter campaign?

– List at least 3 key changes you would make as project manager to improve the project https://coolest.com/ https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/ryangrepper/coolest-cooler-21st-century-cooler-thats-actually https://mashable.com/2016/04/16/coolest-cooler-money/#5r73y4vAvaqw https://www.oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2017/06/coolest_cooler_settles_with_or.html https://www.theverge.com/2016/4/13/11424924/coolest-cooler-kickstarter-disaster-delays

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Framingham Heart Study dataset

Framingham Heart Study dataset.

Using the Framingham Heart Study dataset provided, perform the ANOVA mul variable linear regression analysis using BMI as a con nuous variable. Before conduc ng the analysis, be sure that all par cipants have complete data on all analysis variables. If par cipants are excluded due to missing data, the numbers excluded should be reported. Then describe how each characteris c is related to BMI. Are crude and mul variable e ects similar? What might explain or account for any di erences? H0 The BMI is not related to the pa ent characteris cs in the Framingham Heart Study. (Null Hypothesis) H1 The BMI is related to the pa ent characteris cs in the Framingham Heart Study. (Alterna ve Hypothesis) Upload the Framingham Heart Study dataset into R Studio. (Refer to Chapters 7 (pp. 127-141) & 12 (pp. 207-209) in Introductory Sta s cs with R or pages 111-122 in EXCEL Sta s cs: A Quick Guide). Exclude par cipants with missing data on analysis variables (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, total serum cholesterol, current smoker, and diabetes = cleaning the data). Conduct the simple linear regression (ANOVA) by using the Excel Regression tool in the Data Analysis Toolpak. Remember SEX is coded 1=male and 2=female. RStudio instruc ons: Exclude par cipants with missing data on analysis variables (age, sex, systolic blood pressure, total serum cholesterol, current smoker, and diabetes = cleaning the data). Conduct the simple linear regression (ANOVA) by using RStudio you will use the t.test () command and the summary () command to get your mean and standard devia on. Present your ndings in a Word document by copying and pas ng the ANOVA table into the document. Your paper must include a tle page, an introduc on, a discussion where you interpret the meaning of the ANOVA test, and a conclusion. Your submission should be 3-4 pages to discuss and display your ndings. Provide support for your statements with in-text cita ons from a minimum of four scholarly, peer- reviewed ar cles. Two of these sources may be from the class readings, textbook, or lectures, but the others must be external. The Saudi Digital Library is a good place to nd these sources and should be your primary resource for conduc ng research. Follow APA

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