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Strayer Lithonia Campus Purchasing Options & Customer Satisfaction Discussion

Strayer Lithonia Campus Purchasing Options & Customer Satisfaction Discussion.

Please respond to the following:Watch the video titled “Bass Pro Shops: Maximizing the In-Store Experience”, located here. Examine which consumer market segments tend to purchase online versus in a mega retail store such as Bass Pro Shops. Determine if there are common themes among market segments that influence outlet selection around which retailers can build market strategies. Examine the post-purchase dissonance of consumers and its effect on brand loyalty. Propose two marketing strategies that companies may use to evaluate the level of post-purchase dissonance among brand-loyal consumers.please respond to the following peer posting:I grew up in the 1980’s when shopping malls were at the height of their popularity. My sister and I would wait all week long for Saturday to come when our mom would take us shopping. This was such a big deal for us and a treat that we looked forward to. I never could have imagined the amount of empty store fronts and malls in foreclosure because of the ease of internet shopping. Not all people favor online commerce but choose it based on convenience or accessibility. Baby boomers, for example, are notorious for enjoying the in store experience. Being able to touch and feel the quality of the items you are purchasing is a plus for many shoppers. The visual picture that is shown over the internet cannot take the place of having that product in hand. Having the opportunity to gauge the caliber of the item is a bonus for the consumer. For this market segment, the comfortableness and familiarity of the brick and mortar store surpasses anything that the internet can offer. Millennials would beg to differ with this attitude. These customers did not grow up with the notion that shopping could be a recreational activity. Their first thought is to go online and “Google It” when they need to make a purchase. Within seconds the global marketplace is at their fingertips and the transaction can be finalized within a few clicks. Millennials do not find it inconvenient to order something and then send it back if it is unacceptable. This circumstance is something that is normal to them and not out of the ordinary. This is what they have always experienced and do not feel the need to alter their consumer behavior.No matter the retail outlet situation, there are common themes that all shoppers take into account when making a purchase. Quality is at the top of that list. No matter how something is acquired, people want to now they have spent their money wisely. If the value is not up to par, the consumer will keep searching until their needs are met. Cost is another ideal that all consumers grapple with. Whether a good is bought in person or online, the buying public has to be able to financially afford the purchase. If it does not fit into someone’s budget, the transaction cannot be completed in any outlet. Accessibility also plays a role. The easier it is to find what you are searching for and the quicker you can acquire it, the happier the consumer will be. Whether you are standing in front of a virtual or real life shopping cart, these themes will never change and may only become more important as technology and commerce evolve.Post-purchase dissonance is defined as doubt or anxiety after a purchase is completed. Consumers can feel this often when high involvement transactions take place. Vehicles, luxury vacations, or appliances can all fall into this category. Low involvement purchases do not require a large amount of thought and attachment so regret does not often play a part. Companies want to do all that they can to offset these feelings of remorse to keep their client base satisfied. Organizations that offer high end items thrive on repeat business to stay successful and relevant. If a client becomes extremely regretful after they have purchased a luxury car , that dealership will not be able to depend on that customer the next time they are buying a vehicle. These feelings actually help their competitors in the end by forcing the consumer to look elsewhere because of the uneasy emotions they had during a prior transaction.There are a few ways companies can bypass post-purchase dissonance all together. The simplest option is to produce clear, concise, and transparent marketing material so that there is no place for ambiguity. If the customer knows everything possible about what they are buying up front, there will be no need for any regret or afterthoughts. They will be able to make the decision with a clean conscience without any doubts. To even further cement the choice, the business can introduce a worry free return policy. Knowing that there is no risk with the purchase makes it that much easier to close the sale. Organizations that are able to provide this option know that their products are superior and are able to stand behind them one hundred percent without any hesitation. That fact alone speaks volumes to customers.Hawkins, D.I., Mothersbaugh, D., & Best, R.J. (2016). Consumer Behavior: Building Marketing Strategy (13th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
Strayer Lithonia Campus Purchasing Options & Customer Satisfaction Discussion

Rasmussen College Health Services Research Poster

Rasmussen College Health Services Research Poster.

Instructors comments:Row 1, score 4: Clearly stated, detailed description of the innovation including Purpose of innovation based on needs assessment; Detailed outline of proposed innovation; Relevancy of innovation including at least one resource to support the innovative proposal. Supported with credible referencing. Row 2, score 1: No clear description of risks and benefits of implementation the proposed innovation. What you discussed were not risks and benefits of implementing the nurse recognition program and you failed to include a reference. Row 3, score 1: No clear description of barriers and facilitators to implementation of the innovation including two barriers to implementing the proposal; and two facilitators for implementing the proposal. No referencing used to support information. What you discussed were not barriers to and facilitators of implementing the nurse recognition program Row 4, score 1: While you described the sustainability of innovation including two strategies to support current sustainability; and two strategies to maintain future sustainability, you did not include referencing to support information Row 5, score 2: You cited sources but failed to include them as a reference. You must include a reference for every citation and a citation for every reference.
Rasmussen College Health Services Research Poster

PHYS Indiana State University Application of the Kinetic Energy Problems

essay helper free PHYS Indiana State University Application of the Kinetic Energy Problems.

16. A solid sphere of weight 39.0 N rolls up an incline at an angle of 33.0°. At the bottom of the incline the center of mass of the sphere has a translational speed of 5.30 m/s. (a) What is the kinetic energy of the sphere at the bottom of the incline? (b) How far does the sphere travel up along the incline? (c) Does the answer to (b) depend on the sphere’s mass?14. A man stands on a platform that is rotating (without friction) with an angular speed of 1.51 rev/s; his arms are outstretched and he holds a brick in each hand. The rotational inertia of the system consisting of the man, bricks, and platform about the central axis is 4.52 kg·m2. If by moving the bricks the man decreases the rotational inertia of the system to 1.44 kg·m2, (a) what is the resulting angular speed of the platform and (b) what is the ratio of the new kinetic energy of the system to the original kinetic energy?Those two questions have no diagrams.
PHYS Indiana State University Application of the Kinetic Energy Problems

Understanding of Conservation of Number and Mass in Children

Understanding of Conservation of Number and Mass in Children Abstract One of the most famous child cognitive development theories was coined by Jean Piaget. One of the Piagetian tasks that was used to analyze child development was the conservation task. This task tests if children can reason that a quantity will stay the same regardless of what container it’s in, what shape it changes to and what form it’s in. Children who are in the preoperational stage (ages 2-7) do not fully understand concrete logic so most should fail the conservation task. The next stage in Piaget’s cognitive development theory is concrete operation stage (ages 7-11) where children learn to become more logical and supplicated in their thinking. Children in the concrete operation stage should successfully pass the conservation task. In this study we tested children that were 5 years old and children that were over 7 years old to see if this theory was true. We used two different methods to test children’s knowledge of conservation. Conservation of number and matter. The results show us that although some children under 5 years old are able to complete the number conservation task many of them have trouble performing the matter conservation task. These results highlight Piaget’s cognitive development theory and how children in the preoperational stage (ages 2-7) have not fully learned the concept of conservation even though they may have the ability to perform some conservation tasks. Introduction Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development is a theory of the developmental process of a child from birth to adulthood. He believed that there were different stages in development and as children grow older, they obtain the ability to reason, do logical thinking, think abstractly, and more. Piaget found that conservation was not present during the preoperational stage (ages 2-7) but develops once they reach the concrete operational stage (ages 7-11). Conservation is the ability to logically think of quantity staying the same regardless of changes in appearance (Bjorklund, 2012). For example, in Piaget’s famous conservation task he had two cups of water with the same amount of water in each cup. He poured one cup to a tall glass and the other to a short glass. He found that most kids in the preoperational stage would fail this task by believing that the tall glass contained more water. He also discovered that during the concrete operational stage, children were able to easily identify that both cups still had the same amount of water despite their physical appearance showing that they achieve the ability to logically think about conservation. There have been many studies that replicate Piaget’s conservation task and showed that younger children under 7 years old struggle with this task. A notable study that was performed by Olivier Houdé et al. (2011) further elaborated on the idea of number conservation in children using fMRI to explore the brain activities in children that pass the conservation task and also children who fail the conservation task. In this study they performed the number conservation task on young children (under 7 years old) and older children (ages 8-9). They found that the young children group often failed or were slower at answering the conservation questions. Further elaborating on this they reviewed how the fMRI results showed that there is an involvement of an executive parietofrontal network when older children perform the number conservation task (Houdé et al., 2011). This study confirmed Piaget’s theory about a child’s developmental process and idea of conservation while also adding a neuroscience perspective to the literature. Sawat Pratoomraj and Ronald C. Johnson (1966) performed the same conservation task on children at 4 different ages. In this study they wanted to test if the questions being asked had any effect on how the child did on the conservation task. They found that conservation task success increased with age, which is consistent with Piaget’s theory, and also found that the types of questions asked in these tests had no effect on how well children performed in this task. This present study is exploring the conservation task with children that are 5 years old and above 7. There will be two different types of conservation task that will be studied: conservation of number and conservation of matter. Based on existing studies done on conservation, children that are 5 years old in this study should fail the conversation task and children over 7 should have no problem completing the task. Method Participants There were 7 participants in this study. Divided into two groups, one group was the preoperational stage group which consisted of 4 children all 5 years old. The other group was the concrete operation stage group, which consisted of 3 children two were 7 years old and one was 8 years old. Design There are two phases to this experiment. The first phase was to test children’s knowledge of conservation in number and the second phase was to test children’s knowledge of conservation of matter. Phase 1 In this phase children were shown 5 gold Hershey’s chocolate kisses and 5 silver Hershey’s chocolate kisses. The experimenter laid out the gold and silver chocolates in a row parallel to each other and made sure that the length of both rows was equal. The experimenter then asked the child if there were the same amount of chocolates in each row. Next, the experimenter spreads out a row of chocolate so that one row will appear longer than the other. Both rows still had the same amount of chocolates. The experimenter then asks the children to identify which had more chocolate. After they children gave their answer the experimenter asked them to explain why and their answers were recorded. Phase 2 This phase of the experiment was also a conservation task but focused mainly on matter as a unit of measurement. The experimenter rolled up play dough into a ball and made them both the same size. The experimenter then asked the children if the two balls were the same size. After the children stated that they believed the two balls were the same size, the experimenter then squished one ball. The children were then asked the state which ball they believed was bigger. The children were then asked to give an explanation for their answer. Results This present study was testing Jean Piaget’s theory of cognitive development. Specifically, we tested children’s logical thinking ability of conservation in the preoperational stage (ages 2-7) and the concrete stage (ages 7-11). During the first phase of the study, all of the children over the age of 7 correctly identified that the two rows of Hershey’s chocolate were the same length and passed the number conservation task. Surprisingly, all of the 5-year-old children were also able to pass the number conservation task (figure 1). Phase 2 showed slightly different results from phase 1. During phase 2, children that were over the age of 7 were able to correctly identify that the play dough was the same size even after they were squished. Three out of four children who were 5 years old failed the matter conservation task. All 4 of the 5-year-olds agreed that the play dough was the same size when shaped like a ball, but after the ball was squished, three out of the four believed that the squished ball was bigger than the round ball. Discussion The reason why there were two phases in this experiment was to test whether children fully mastered how to do conservation task. As shown in the results children who were over the age of 7 were able to able to complete both the number conservation and matter conservation task showing that they have reached the concrete operation stage of cognitive development. We hypothesized that children in the preoperational stage group would fail both number and matter conservation. In this study child in the preoperational stage group were all able to successfully perform the number conservation task. We believe that children were able to perform this task because they were able to physically see the amount of chocolate on the table and no matter how far we moved them apart from each other there were 5 chocolates in each row. The children were able to count the chocolate to confirm that the amount of chocolate did not change despite the row looking longer. In matter conservation task only 1 child successfully performed the task from the preoperational stage group. We speculate that this was because children had to rely on actual logical thinking in order to determine that the play dough was still the same size despite the squished play dough looking larger than the round one. One limitation of this study is that it only tested children’s knowledge on conversation of number and mass. There is conservation of liquid, area, volume, and many more. Adding more conservation tasks could specifically show us if older children are able to fully understand the concept of conservation. References Bjorklund, D. F.,

Treatment for a Patient with Depression and Insomnia Discussion

Treatment for a Patient with Depression and Insomnia Discussion.

Please response to DAVID ONDERDavid Onder Main PostCOLLAPSETreatment for a Patient with Depression and InsomniaPoor sleep has detrimental effects on physical and mental health (Abbott, 2016). Sleep disturbances are both a symptom of and a cause of mental illnesses like depression and anxiety (Abbott, 2016). While treating the underlying mental illness is associated with mild improvement in sleep difficulties, insomnia tends to be chronic unless it is the direct target of treatment (Abbott, 2016). This post will focus on treating insomnia in a depressed 75-year-old woman who lost her husband to death in the past year. Specific questions to ask, key stakeholders to involve, and diagnostic tests to perform will be highlighted. Also, a differential diagnosis will be given with recommendations for psychopharmacology and check points to ensure adequate resolution of symptoms.Questions to AskHow long have you been taking the sertraline? One of the main side effects of sertraline is insomnia (Muijsers et al., 2002), so a further understanding of the timeframe of insomnia onset compared to starting sertraline would be helpful information.What are the patient’s bedtimes and rise times? Do they vary throughout the week? What does the nighttime routine look like? Poor sleep hygiene is associated with insomnia (American Family Physician, 1999).Does the patient have frequent jerking movements of the arms or legs when trying to sleep? Medical conditions like restless legs syndrome can significantly and adversely affect sleep (American Family Physician, 1999).Key StakeholdersFamily members and friends with frequent contact with the patient can be invaluable sources of information to further assess the patient’s depression and insomnia. The patient may identify vague complaints of not feeling rested, but the family or caregiver may be able to further specify patient symptoms. Questions to ask include: 1) Is your family member having any increased mood disturbances or irritability?, 2) Have they been more prone to mistakes or accidents lately?, 3) How are they functioning in social and family situations? (Suzuki et al., 2017).Physical Exams and Diagnostic TestsThe most helpful tool to detect insomnia is a thorough sleep history that can be included in the review of systems (American Family Physician, 1999). If the patient is having trouble identifying sleep patterns, then a sleep journal may be used for tracking (American Family Physician, 1999). Since the patient is a diabetic and has HTN, a thorough medical exam should be done to see how well these conditions are being managed. States of hyperarousal can be studied through EEG testing (Levenson et al., 2015), although it is unclear how helpful this information is in treating insomnia beyond the information that can be gathered through subjective exams. Additionally, cortisol, melatonin, calcium, and noradrenaline are compounds associated with increased insomnia depending on levels (Levenson et al., 2015).Differential DiagnosisInsomnia Disorder – The primary feature of insomnia disorder is difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or being generally dissatisfied with sleep quantity or quality (American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013). While a thorough sleep questionnaire will reveal further information about the patient’s insomnia, the diagnosis of insomnia disorder is the most likely differential diagnosis. This condition is closely associated with patients having comorbid depression (APA, 2013).Situational/acute insomnia – As opposed to insomnia disorder, acute insomnia’s time course is few days to several weeks. Symptoms of acute insomnia are significant distress and social, personal, and occupational functional decline (APA, 2013).Restless legs syndrome – RLS causes problems falling asleep and maintaining sleep due to urges to move the legs (APA, 2013). This condition, as well as any other physical causes of insomnia, would be teased out through a thorough sleep evaluation questionnaire.Pharmacologic AgentsBecause of the risks of polypharmacy, nonpharmacologic methods of promoting restful sleep should always be considered. These include regular exercise, keeping the bedroom dark and quiet, eating at regular times and not too closely to bedtime, and avoiding caffeine intake (Suzuki et al., 2017). However, if left untreated, insomnia has a significant and negative impact on quality of life and mental health, and it should be addressed accordingly (Suzuki et al., 2017). Pharmacotherapy will differ depending on the patient’s responses on the questionnaire. For example, if the patient has difficulty initiating sleep but does not have difficulty staying asleep, then a short-acting hypnotic like zolpidem is indicated. Zolpidem has a lower risk of falls and residual tiredness than other benzodiazapine hypnotics, and its starting dose in the elderly population is 5mg (Suzuki et al., 2017).A second drug that would be useful in this case study is trazodone. Trazodone is effective in the treatment of depression and insomnia (Mayor et al., 2015), and it could be used as an adjunct to the sertraline for treatment-resistant depression. Concerns in this elderly patient include the risk of serotonin syndrome when combining an SSRI with trazodone and the need to monitor sodium levels (Mayor et al., 2015). The usual daily dose of trazodone is 200-400mg (Stern et al., 2016), but the patient’s age and concomitant use of sertraline makes a starting dose of 50mg oral nightly preferable. Starting elderly patients at half the usual adult dose is indicated due to slower processing and excreting of medications by the elderly (Fisher & Valente, 2009). The patient should follow up at two and four weeks to see resolution or continuation of sleep difficulties. After sleep has been restored, followup every three to six months seems appropriate.ConclusionIn conclusion, managing depression more effectively may promote resolution of insomnia, but the cyclical nature of insomnia and depression means that both will likely require treatment at least for the short term. Elderly patients are at increased risk of polypharmacy and problems metabolizing and excreting medications, so followup should be frequent at first and then taper off once symptoms have resolved and no intolerable adverse effects are reported. Finally, several possible solutions were provided in this post, but this list is by no means exhaustive and completion of a sleep questionnaire is essential to fully understanding the patient’s insomnia and appropriate treatment options.ReferencesAbbott, J. (2016). What’s the link between insomnia and mental illness? https://www.sciencealert.com/what-exactly-is-the-link-between-insomnia-and-mental-illness#:~:text=Sleep%20problems%20such%20as%20insomnia%20are%20a%20common,bipolar%20disorder%2C%20and%20attention%20deficit%20hyperactivity%20disorder%20%28ADHD%29American Family Physician. (1999). Insomnia: Assessment and management in primary care. American Family Physician, 59(11), 3029–3038.American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-5 (5th ed.). American Psychiatric Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596Fisher, D., & Valente, S. (2009). Evaluating and managing insomnia. The Nurse Practitioner, 34(8), 20–26. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.NPR.0000358658.43101.d0Levenson, J. C., kay, D. B., & Buysse, D. J. (2015). The pathophysiology of insomnia. Chest, 147(4), 1179–1192. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.14-1617Mayor, J. S., Pacheco, A. P., Esperanca, S., & Silva, A. O. (2015). Trazodone in the elderly: Risk of extrapyramidal acute events. BMJ Case Reports. https://doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2015-210726Muijsers, R. B., Plosker, G. L., & Noble, S. (2002). Sertraline: a review of its use in the management of major depressive disorder in elderly patients. Drugs & Aging, 19(5), 377–392. https://doi.org/10.2165/00002512-200219050-00006Stern, T. A., Fava, M., Wilens, T. E., & Rosenbaum, J. F. (2016). Massachusetts General Hospital psychopharmacology and neurotherapeutics (1st ed.). Elsevier.Suzuki, K., Miyamoto, M., & Hirata, K. (2017). Sleep disorders in the elderly: Diagnosis and management. Journal of General and Family Medicine, 18(2), 61–71. https://doi.org/10.1002/jgf2.27
Treatment for a Patient with Depression and Insomnia Discussion