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Strayer Integrating Sustainability Indicators Into Project Management Proposal

Strayer Integrating Sustainability Indicators Into Project Management Proposal.

You have been selected to be the Project Manager for a project of your choice. The project you decide to use must be one of a professional nature and must last for at least twelve months. In addition, the project should meet the key criteria of a project, such as:Has a beginning and an end.Results in something being delivered to someone. Requires a series of activities that must be done to complete the projectRequires resources (e.g., people, materials) to complete the work.Note: You are prohibited from using projects that can be found on the Internet, including projects found in places like CourseHero. All project submissions are submitted to SafeAssign for review.InstructionsWrite a 2–3 page paper in which you define the scope of your chosen project. In your paper you must:Provide a brief summary of your chosen project.Describe at least three project goals and three project objectives.Identify the key customer(s) and at least two stakeholders for your project. Remember, you are delivering the project to your customer(s); however, there are others (stakeholders) who have a vested interest in your project.Describe at least three key milestones and/or deliverables for your project.Describe a high-level timeline that includes key tasks and deadlines.Estimate the project’s overall cost and any key staffing and non-staffing resources needed.Use at least three quality resources in this assignment. Note: Wikipedia and similar websites do not qualify as quality resources.This course requires the use of Strayer Writing Standards. For assistance and information, please refer to the Strayer Writing Standards link in the left-hand menu of your course. Check with your professor for any additional instructions.The specific course learning outcome associated with this assignment is:Evaluate corporate strategy and the project life cycle phases to define the project and initiate a project pla
Strayer Integrating Sustainability Indicators Into Project Management Proposal

Types of Strategic Decision Making Models

Introduction: Life is made upon the decisions. Individuals, regardless of their age, career, and any other factor, make decisions on almost daily routine. Decisions may have small or big scopes with short term or big term impacts on individuals or group of people. No one can deny the role of decisions, either made by him/herself or someone else, on his or her life. Similar to human beings, organizations are dealing with the decisions that are made in them every single day. Although all the managers at any level, and even sometimes employees, make decisions, the important decisions including strategic decisions are usually made by senior and top managers across organizations. Based on the nature of decision and other factors, their lifetimes and their effects may vary. Strategic Decisions are amongst the most important ones that are made in any organization and usually have long lasting effects on the companies. The importance of strategic decisions is undeniable, so it is worth exploring its process and any factor pertaining to it. In this course paper, I endeavor to review the existing literature on strategic decision making process. Environmental factors and constraints shape the main framework for managers, and most of the managerial decisions are inevitably influenced by internal and external environmental boundaries and constraints. (4) The environment is always changing and the dynamic condition of global brings uncertainty and risks into the managerial decision process. On the other hand, due to time, knowledge and other limitations and restrictions, managers make decisions with uncertain and incomplete information. Some managers use intuition to handle existing uncertainties and deal with organizational problems. According to the Klain, 90% of managerial decisions are made intuitively (Klain, 2004). Strategic Decision For defining strategic decisions, it is better to start with definition of decisions in general. Based on the Meriam-Webster dictionary decisions are “conclusions or resolutions reached after consideration.” Based on this basic definition, each decision has 3 main steps: First, identification of need or a dissatisfaction of current situation or; Second, moving towards satisfaction or filling the recognized need; Third, a conscious dedication to implement the actions regarding reaching to the point of fulfillment (Arsham, 2010).(1) Strategic decisions are the decisions that influence the long-term state of the organization. In general the process of developing and putting into action choices that lead to major organizational changes is called strategic decision making process. (2) Strategic decisions usually bring long-term financial and non-financial commitments to the organizations and it’s usually difficult to reverse the strategic decisions once they are implemented in the organizations. (2) Therefore, managers for making the strategic decisions, unlike common managerial decisions, use more time and effort and pay more attention (4). Strategic management involves with unplanned, unstructured and complex problems; thus strategic decisions are made under uncertainty (Rutherford-Silvers J., 2008; Dragomir, C., 2012; Stefanescu, R., 2013). The strategic decisions usually play the bridge role between current and future states of the organization (Papadakis

Week Three Article Review

help writing Week Three Article Review. Find a peer-reviewed journal article that involves the transtheoretical model of change applied to address a health behavior of your choice. This assignment must reflect college-level writing and critical thinking. The article you select should be an empirical article (not a review article), meaning that it involved the collection of data. The article could be, for example, research that has used the theory to examine theoretical risk factors for obesity, has tested the behavior theory in some way, or has used the theory in an intervention. Remember to cite your chosen article properly. You may want to select a journal article topic that aligns with your Final Paper topic, so that your review of the article contributes to your Final Paper’s literature review. In your paper: Describe the theory that was chosen, including all of the constructs, definitions or descriptions of the constructs, and how the constructs are related to each other and ultimately to behavior. Summarize the research article—in your own words—not a copy/paste of the abstract. Describe the authors’ use of the theory in the research and how it was applied to the research. Explain your thoughts and opinions about how the authors used the theory (any strengths and weaknesses). Explain the implications for future interventions Explain its relevancy to other public health issues or topics.Week Three Article Review

HCA 340 CSUDH Strategic Management Issues at Apple Company Discussion

HCA 340 CSUDH Strategic Management Issues at Apple Company Discussion.

I’m working on a management discussion question and need an explanation to help me learn.

Prompt – DUE THURSDAY – 12/10/20 – 1 page – APA formatFind a peer-reviewed research article published in the last five years from your online library that addresses a company’s problem (e.g., supply chain management, country regulations, strategic management, employee skills, and ethical dilemmas) that was resolved through qualitative or quantitative data. Research how the company used qualitative or quantitative data to solve organizational problems. Include a discussion of the instrument used and a justification of why the instrument was the best instrument at the time of study. Do not duplicate companies, for example, if your classmate chooses Black & Decker Corporation, no other student should choose Black & Decker.Support your statements with logic and at least three credible references. Please use APA style in-text citations and references to support your posts.
HCA 340 CSUDH Strategic Management Issues at Apple Company Discussion

Study of existing Reverse Logistics framework Retail industry

Study of existing Reverse Logistics framework Retail industry. Abstract: Reverse Logistics is a very complex and specialized area of any supply chain and it involves handling individual incoming parcels, opening and inspecting products, communicating with internal departments, customers and vendors and then directing products into disposition channels which will provide the highest value. Efficient Reverse Logistics system can transform an increasingly costly and complex returns management process into a competitive advantage. Integration of reverse logistics in specific retail sectors is critical for sustainability. The aim of this project work is to identify and examine the reverse logistics management in the retail industry in order to understand the existing application of reverse logistics and then propose relevant recommendations to improve efficiency in reverse logistics management. After critical analysis of the existing reverse logistics management in the selected retail sectors, potential ways to improve the efficiency of reverse logistics activities would be recommended in the selected retail sectors. Chapter 1: Introduction Twenty-years ago, supply chains were busy fine-tuning the logistics of products from raw material to the end customer. Products are obviously still streaming in the direction of the end customer but an increasing flow of products is coming back. This is happening for a whole range of industries, covering electronic goods, pharmaceuticals, beverages and so on. For instance distant sellers like e-tailers have to handle high return rates and many times at no cost for the customer. It is not surprising that the Reverse Logistics Executive Council has announced that US firms have been losing billions of dollars on account of being ill-prepared to deal with reverse flows (Rogers and Tibben-Lembke, 1999). While some actors in the chain have been forced to take products back, others have pro-actively done so, attracted by the value in used products. One way or the other, Reverse Logistics has become a key competence in modern supply chains. Many companies that, previously, did not devote much time or energy to the management and understanding of reverse logistics have begun to pay attention. Definition of reverse logistics In 1998 Stock defined reverse logistics as “the role of logistics in product returns, source reduction, recycling, materials substitution, reuse of materials, waste disposal and refurbishing, repair, and remanufacturing” (1998, p. 20). In a 1998 paper in the Journal of Business Logistics Carter and Ellram adopted a similar definition, calling it “the process whereby companies can become more environmentally efficient through recycling, reusing, and reducing the amount of materials used” (p. 85). If the focus of logistics is the movement of material from the point of origin toward the point of consumption (Council of Logistics Management 1999), then the focus of reverse logistics should be the movement of material from the point of consumption toward the point of origin. Rogers and Tibben-Lembke in their 1999 article emphasized a clear definition of reverse logistics drawn in essence from the Council of Logistics Management’s definition given as follows, ” The process of planning, implementing, and controlling the efficient, cost effective flow of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods, and related information from the point of consumption to the point of origin for the purpose of recapturing or creating value or proper disposal ” (Rogers and Tibben-Lembke 1999, p. 2) This dissertation focuses on the reverse logistics activities in the retail industry with an analysis framework concerning the cost-benefit, visibility-information flow and efficiency. A reverse logistics flow is more reactive with much less visibility. The figure 1 depicts a typical reverse logistics information flow for the retail channel. For instance, when a consumer returns an item to a retail store, the store collects he items to be sent to a centralized sorting facility. At the time, information about the item and its condition may be entered into retailer’s information system and forwarded to the processing centre. Figure Reverse logistics in Retail: an epitome of information flow Delineation of reverse logistics definition Since Reverse Logistics is a relatively new research and empirical area, there are other literature terms, like reversed logistics, return logistics and retro logistics or reverse distribution, sometimes referring roughly to the same. In fact, the diversity of definitions with respect to recovery practices is a well-recognized source of misunderstandings both in research as in practice (Melissen and De Ron, 1999) In this dissertation I would like to remark that Reverse Logistics is different from waste management as the latter mainly refers to collecting and processing waste (products for which there is no new use) efficiently and effectively. The crux in this matter is the definition of waste. This is a major issue, as the term has severe legal consequences, for instance, it is often forbidden to import waste. Reverse Logistics concentrates on those streams where there is some value to be recovered and the outcome enters a (new) supply chain. Reverse Logistics also differs from green logistics as that considers environmental aspects to all logistics activities and it has been focused specifically on forward logistic, i.e. from producer to customer (Rodrigue et al., 2001). The prominent environmental issues in logistics are consumption of non-renewable natural resources, air emissions, congestion and road usage, noise pollution, and both hazardous and non-hazardous waste disposal (see Camm, 2001). Finally, reverse logistics can be seen as part of sustainable development. The latter has been defined by Brundland (1998) in a report to the European Union as “to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” In fact one could regard reverse logistics as the implementation at the company level by making sure that society uses and re-uses both efficiently and effectively all the value which has been put into the products. The border between forward logistics (from raw materials to end user) and reverse logistics (from end user to recovery or to a new user) is not strictly defined as one can wonder about what ‘raw materials’ are, or who the ‘end user’ is, in modern supply chains. For instance, used/recovered glass is a substantial input for new production of glass. A holistic view on supply chains combining both forward and reverse logistics is embraced by the closed-loop supply chain concept (Guide and van Wassenhove, 2003). Recovery practices are framed within the supply chain, and the encircling aspect of the process as a whole is therefore stressed: having either 1) a physical (closed-loop): to the original user (see Fleischmann et al., 1997); or 2) a functional (closed-loop): to the original functionality. Thinking in term of closed-loop supply chains emphasizes the importance of coordinating the forward with the reverse streams. Actually, whenever both forward and reverse flows are involved, co-ordination has to be minded (see Debo et al., 2003). This happens, either in closed- or open-loops (the latter refers to when neither the original user nor original functionality are in the reverse logistics process). Aim and objectives of the project Reverse Logistics is a very complex and specialized area of any supply chain and it involves handling individual incoming parcels, opening and inspecting products, communicating with internal departments, customers and vendors and then directing products into disposition channels which will provide the highest value. Efficient Reverse Logistics system can transform an increasingly costly and complex returns management process into a competitive advantage. Integration of reverse logistics in specific retail sectors is critical for sustainability. The aim of this project work is to identify and examine the reverse logistics management in the retail industry in order to understand the existing application of reverse logistics and then propose relevant recommendations to improve efficiency in reverse logistics management. In order to achieve this objective the project work would involve Identifying the key retail sectors in which reverse logistics has and will have potential importance Examine the various reverse logistics activities in the selected retail sectors Analyze the effectiveness of reverse logistics management from the perspective of efficiency, profitability and environmental aspects Propose recommendations to improve the efficiency of reverse logistics management Report organization The dissertation consists of five main chapters which is organized as follows Chapter 1 introduces the research topics as well as the main objective of this study. Moreover, this chapter provides some of the background information about reverse logistics. It also provides a brief detail of the research methodology and the organization of the dissertation. Chapter 2 provides the basic knowledge of reverse logistics process together with key success factors and barriers of effective reverse logistics management are introduced. The previous papers are discussed in the literature review section. Chapter 3 discusses the information about research design and data collection method. The section elucidates the research approach and the relevant frameworks to be included in the research conduct. This section discusses about the methodology of how the reverse logistics management is analyzed to address the research questions. Chapter 4 discusses the analysis related to the reverse logistics trends and the effectiveness of reverse logistics management from the holistic perspective of cost, efficiency and environmental aspects. The key drivers and persistent barriers for reverse logistics management for the selected retail companies are discussed. Lastly, chapter 5 concludes the result of the finding and the analysis. The recommendation and the discussion about the future research are discussed. Chapter 2: Literature review Background Retailers constantly focus on strategies to gain competitive advantage and to improve financial performance. In doing so, emphasis is more frequently being placed on logistics, including tactical initiatives such as automatic replenishment programs, real-time information sharing, and advanced demand management techniques designed to improve internal efficiencies (Li 2002; Daugherty, Myers,Study of existing Reverse Logistics framework Retail industry