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Societal Security and National Identity Essay

Introduction Societal security differs from the traditional approaches on various levels. Unlike the traditional approach to security, a new concept argues that security can be based on economy, environmental protection and politics. Societal security focuses on how to preserve the society against infiltration, invasion and military actions from foreigners (Panić 2009). In addition, societal security is best analyzed from an international and individual perspective. Therefore, international systems, subsystems, units and subunits are critical to the analysis of societal security (Panić 2009). Compared to the traditional approach, societal security does not focus on territorial sovereignty. Instead, societal security focuses on collective identity ranging from politics, economy, institutions, and the environment to individuals. Therefore, preservation of elements that compose national identity is the hallmark of societal security. Reconceptualising security Security as the survival of the society rather than of the state In recent times, security is viewed as a survival of the society and not the state. From this perspective, the concepts of security from a national perspective focus on protecting the sovereignty of the state (Brauch 2008). Major threats for national security means include countries, terrorism and guerrilla groups. From state security, a focus on national and societal groups becomes imperative. The main aim of societal security is to preserve national unity and identity (Brauch 2008). In this context, threats against national identity are derived from immigrants and foreign cultures. Human security refers to survival for individual or mankind. However, human survival refers to the quality of life that may be threatened by nature, terrorism and globalization (Brauch 2008). Environmental security refers to the sustainability of the ecosystem that is normally threatened by mankind through pollution and socioeconomic activities. In other instances, human survival can be determined by gender security. In this context, indigenous people, gender relations, racial minorities, mature adult and children are subject to insecurity (Brauch 2008). The idea of providing gender security is to promote equality, equity, identity and social representations that are threatened by totalitarian institutions, intolerance, elites, violence and religion. Societal security as a threat to collective identity National, ethnic and religious identities As the need for societal security grows with time, countries become sources of self-threat, especially on national, ethnic and religious matters. For example, as countries prevent invasions from other nations, the consequences result in the creation of inter-regional conflicts. Therefore, acts of war and similar provocations by the government may endanger the citizens and the country from external attacks. Moreover, the need to have a collective identity may cause inter-ethnic conflicts due to lack of intolerance. The same intolerance may threaten freedom of worship and human rights, especially on religious matters. Unrest in Tibet The outbreak of unrest in Tibet in 2008 was a classic example of how societal security threatens peace in the region (Topgyal 2011). China’s threats against Tibet’s affected the region’s economic, political, environmental and individual arrangements. In fact, China’s invasion in Tibet and the subsequent colonization was an example of how the country is intolerant to other societies’ way of life. On the other hand, the uprising in Tibet justified the right to self-protection against societal insecurities (Topgyal 2011). From this perspective, using civil rights movements, guerrilla warfare and nonviolence mechanisms to protect territorial integrity was necessary. Moreover, the unrest in Tibet was driven by the need for improved quality of life from the oppressive Chinese government (Topgyal 2011). Moreover, the Tibetans requested equal treatment and social representation of the society in the region’s economic and socio-political aspects. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More References Brauch, H G 2008, ‘Introduction: Globalization and Environmental Challenges: Reconceptualizing Security in the 21st Century’, Globalization and Environmental Challenges: Reconceptualizing Security in the 21st Century, pp. 27-43. Panić, B 2009, ‘Societal security–security and identity,’ Western Balkans Security Observer-English Edition, no.13, pp. 28-39. Topgyal, T 2011, ‘Insecurity dilemma and the Tibetan uprising in 2008,’ Journal of Contemporary China, vol. 20, no. 69, pp. 183-203.
A marketing campaign, especially the one in the field of healthcare, is associated with several legal issues. Some of them can be avoided by excluding deceptive techniques or assuring none of the adopted existing ones can be recognized as unfair. Others, such as privacy issues and violations of advertisement standards, as well as some online-based marketing methods, require extra attention to avoid disruption of marketing integrity. The broadest field of marketing issues, which is also strongly associated with the healthcare field, is unfair marketing. This term includes deliberately misleading claims as well as those who are technically true but are presented in a way that distorts the image in favor of the seller (Australian Government 12). One of the issues which are likely to occur given the available information is the inclusion of premium claims in the marketing campaign. A premium claim is a suggestion that creates the image of the product or service being conclusively superior to its competitors. As the description includes the phrase “state of the art gym,” which suggests the equipment of unprecedented quality, it is possible that at least some customers will make a decision to use its services based upon such understanding. While the current wording is not enough to classify it as a violation, it can be ruled out as such, depending on the contextual clues (Corones 189). Another issue often faced by the healthcare and fitness industries is the deliberate or unintentional use of unsubstantiated claims in describing the benefits of the program. For instance, the description of services may include the phrases “the best abs in just two weeks – guaranteed.” First, the word “guaranteed” is prone to misinterpretation: while the results obviously depend on the human factor, such as the persistence of the customers, the wording of the advertisement will likely be ruled out as deceptive regardless of the actual warranties and liabilities included in the contract. Second, the phrase “best abs” needs to be substantiated by the relevant research which conclusively shows the advantages of a certain business program over competing ones. Importantly, the misleading does not need to be deliberate to be categorized as deceptive marketing, so additional caution needs to be exercised in word choice (Australian Government 14). The Internet, which has recently become an important marketing platform, but introduced an additional layer of complexity. First, the information situated on the official page of the company is considered representative of the quality of the product or service, regardless of the source it comes from. In other words, if a satisfied customer sends feedback praising the gym as “the best place in Australia,” his assertion will have the same weight as the “best abs” claim described above, based on the fact of its location (ACCC par. 2). To avoid the prosecution for such claims, the online resources either need to be limited to internal publications or must introduce moderation to filter the unsubstantiated claims. The former restricts the useful feedback which improves the company’s reputation while the latter requires significant resource and time investments, especially after the service obtains enough online followers. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More Moderation introduces another issue – that of objective treatment. If the process is biased towards favorable reviews while the negative feedback gets deleted more frequently, such a process will also fall under the unfair marketing category. Naturally, the creation or alteration of existing feedback to create a more appealing image also falls within this category (ACCC par. 4). All of the above makes the Internet a far more demanding segment of the marketing campaign. The improperly conceived customer agreements may also become an issue. Parts 2 and 3 of the ACL list the most common characteristics of the unfair contract, such as the lack of liability for negligence, the possibility to withdraw payments from the customer’s bank account without prior notice, and the consumer liabilities for aspects not controlled by them, among others (Australian Government 13). For instance, if the contract contains the possibility of increasing the fee, proper notification and damage compensation mechanisms must be included. Otherwise, such a contract can not be considered binding. Finally, a number of possible issues may arise depending on the advertisement strategies chosen by the management. For instance, if the company decides to issue research, the data collected from the customers need to be protected from possible leakages and unauthorized use. Besides, according to the Australian Information Commissioner Act 2010, all of the participants need to be informed about the intentions of the researchers as well as the possible risks connected to the data preservation and processing (“Australian Information Commissioner Act 2010” par. 19). In the case when the electronic means of advertisement is preferred by the company, the technique should be conceived with the Australian Spam Act 2003 in mind. Spam in its explicit form is outlawed in Australia, so the management needs to pay special attention for its advertising materials to fall under this category (ACMA par. 3). Similarly, the telemarketing practices are currently ineffective, mostly due to the existence of the Do-Not-Call Register. Similarly, door to door sales is discouraged both by the legal restrictions and the growing public resentment (“Competition and Consumer Act 2010” par. 28). To conclude, the management must execute caution in establishing the marketing and advertising techniques to secure legal integrity and to foster favorable reputation and exclude misunderstanding. Works Cited ACCC. Firm Fined for Testimonials by Facebook “Fans” and Tweeters, 2011. Web. ACMA. Spam Act 2003 FAQs, 2016. Web. We will write a custom Essay on Fitness Marketing Programs: Key Issues specifically for you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Australian Information Commissioner Act 2010, 2014. Web. Australian Government. The Australian Consumer Law – A Framework Overview, 2013. Web. Competition and Consumer Act 2010, 2013. Web. Corones, Stephen. “Misleading premium claims.” Australian Business Law Review 44.3 (2016): 188-203. Print.

History class forum

History class forum.

This week we are discussing revolutions. We have been discussing or your readings for the last week have been hinting at revolutions.For this forum you will visit Fordham’s Internet History Sourcebook. A place where you can find primary sources.It is located here at this website http://legacy.fordham.edu/Halsall/mod/modsbook.aspIf you cannot open the site via the forum here, you will need to copy and paste the link into a new window, I have also put the link on the side tool bar.You will go down to the section called “The Transformation of the West Scientific, Political, and Industrial Revolution” and “The 19th Century and Western Hegemony”Under these two headings are topics – they will be listed below. You are to go into these topics and look at the primary source. The topics are as follows:Scientific RevolutionEnlightenmentAmerican RevolutionFrench RevolutionIndustrial Revolution1848Once you have looked around, you are to choose a primary source to discuss. Some of these primary sources are short but it is your responsibility to do some outside research.The assignment for this discussion forum -Choose a primary source – make sure the title and the links are at the beginning of your discussion so your peers can access your source.Discuss the source, what the author implying or saying? What was going on at the time for the primary source? Give any other pertinent information dealing with your source.You do need a bibliography – minimum of two sources.Requirements for forum responses.Word Minimum for initial response — 250-300 words. Formatted correctly
History class forum

Effective use for family art therapy

custom writing service Effective use for family art therapy. Originally used in individual sessions, art therapy is taking a more active and integrated role in family therapy, crisis interventions such as violence in the home or alcoholism in the family, with mental health patients (e.g. schizophrenics), and children who are adopted or in foster homes. Families are a complex system comprised of subsytems, alliances, and triangles. In order to get a better understanding of familial patterns and how the family operates, art therapy “sessions with the entire family provides an unusual opportunity to observe how the family unit functions in a situation less formal and less subject to their established mechanisms of control than is the purely verbal pyschotherapeutic interview” (Kwiatkowska, p. 27). Art therapy is useful for “providing an individual the opportunity to step back and evaluate the meaning of his or her subjective art expressions. This promotes a person’s ability to symbolize, to think, and to think about thinking. Visual representation offers a means to express multiple layers of meaning in a condensed format. The graphic product is durable, allowing a client to review and respond to what has been expressed” (Linesch, p. 26). Individuals, family members and the therapist literally have a visual picture of how an individual views themselves, their role in the family, wishes they have for their family, or anything else they have kept to themselves. Another effective use for art therapy is using metaphors to teach parents and children new roles and relationships, thus adding a new dimension to structural family therapy (Linesh, p. 51). For example, if a family is struggling with their adolescent child and the child draws his mother with a big mouth and says that mother is always yelling, mother realizes how she is affecting the family with her yelling. According to Kwiatkowska, the focus of therapy often switches because of the way different family members present their views of the problem. The initial reason for seeking treatment is overshadowed by a totally different aspect of the family disurbance brought to their awareness through their art productions (p.139). Drawing pictures, painting, or working with clay may seem easy and fun to do but “this work demands a solid backgorund in family therapy and extensive psychoterapeutic experience in addition to art therapy training” (Kwiatkowska, p. 137). Case and Dalley agree that “the theory and practice of art therapy has evolved to require that the practioners of art therapy are highly trained and experienced people whose skills continue to develop after their initial training program” (p. 146). Like regular therapists, art therapists must create boundaries with their clients and their families. One must be firm with families who disrupt the session either with constant bickering or irrelevant flow of words. Eventually such maneuvers should be explored as one of the patterns of family behavior (Kwiatkowska, p. 31). The basic role of the therapist is to create a non-threatening environment for the family as some members may feel anxious about working with art. It is the therapists duty to remind the family that “when doing evaluations, it is important to emphasize that they will not be graded or tested on their artistic skill but instead use the media as a way to communicate and self expression” (Kwiatkowska, p. 85). It is also important that the “room must feel safe enough to express ideas, feelings, thoughts. Having open access to materials can make avilable man posible avenues of expression” (Case and Dalley, p. 99). Case and Dalley believe “it is not the job of the therapist to encourage spilling out of emotions but in fact to help the client feel that her feelings, however difficult to express, will be contained, listened to and understood” (p. 102). “The therapist’s role is to remain open to the imagery and all its potential meaning for the patient and containt the anxiety and feelings that are generated in attempting to understand it. It is possible a clear meaning will not emerge until weeks into therapy where connections can made and understanding takes place” (Case and Dalley, p. 65). During assessments or therapy sessions the therapist will give the family some directives. For example, the therapist may request that the family draw “a free picture, a picture of your family, an abstract family portrait, a picture started with the help of a scribble, a joing family scribble, then another free picture” (Kwiatkowska, p. 86). The therapist should take notice of what materials each member uses and how they are explaining their picture. Proulx explains that as the art therapist views the work, they keep in mind the interactions that occurred how the material was used to symbolically represent the relationship and the amount of personal space occupied by the child or parent. Intensity of media application, amount of energy portrayed: is it full of life, full of color? Also note in the portrait who is included, who is left out, and which part of the work becomes the parents possession or the child’s. Are there obvious projections ontothe child by the parent? Is there engagement, communication, emotional contact, enjoyment and loving? ( p. 72). Although some directives are given, the therapist should not offer help to the “children until the parents or siblings have responded (or not responded) to the child’s plea for help. Their behavior in this regard is an important source of information about how the parents have met their need of their adolescent or young adult offspring in their early childhood” (Kwiatkowska, p. 85). In a regular session, the therapist can get more information from the family by asking them to “explore self-perceptions. To do this, therapist can ask family members to draw themselves as they feel inside and to draw themselves as they imagine they look to their family” (Linesch, p. 28). “To facilitate adaptive coping, therapist might ask family to choose pictures or draw images that describe possible solutions to the problem. Family members may also be asked to represent themselves and their families as they are now and as they would like to be in the future. This can bring to light individual needs and family problem-solving” (Linesch, p. 29). One of the disadvantages of art therapy is that the therapist is more vulnerable to misinterpretation in terms of the objective understanding of content. Care must be taken not to make rapid interpretations which might prevent or even deny the client the satisfaction of discovering and finding out for herself (Case and Dalley, p. 65). Because art therapy involves a lot of interpreation, it is understandable that critiques about this technique are similar to that of psychotherapy. The individual’s images can come across as many things but only the individual himself can explain it. The therapist is urged not to point out obvious red signals, instead they should allow the client to come up with their own interpretations. Their own interpretations alone are something to make note of as it may shed some light on the client’s thought process. Throughout many examples explored, art therapy was useful in helping family members listen to one another, rebalance hierarchies, and “provided a vehicle for the individuals to take advantage of increased self-expressive abilities and share their internal experiences as communication between family/system members (Linesch, p. 158). Effective use for family art therapy

A Tale of Two Routes Paper

A Tale of Two Routes Paper.

Instructions: In class we discussed one of the major theories of persuasion, the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM). For this activity, you will apply your knowledge of the two routes of processing proposed by the ELM (i.e., the central and peripheral routes) to identifying the extent to which components of a sales pitch on the popular show Shark Tank encourage each of these routes. Refer to class notes from Unit 13 (Persuasion and Public Communication) as well as the Booth-Butterfield (n.d.) and O’Keefe (2012) readings from Unit 13 to help you complete this activity. Choose any sales pitch from Shark Tank during which entrepreneurs ask the Sharks to invest in their product. You may choose any sales pitch that is available to you on Youtube. Then, respond to the following: Identify 3 message factors from this clip that encouraged central route processing about investing in the product and describe why they are relevant to the message argument of investing in the product.Identify 3 message factors from this clip that encouraged peripheral route processing about investing in the product and describe why each is a heuristic cue rather than a message that supports the message argument of investing in the product.Are the Sharks more likely to process centrally or peripherally? Why? Make sure to discuss this in terms of your motivation and your ability to process the message.When YOU watched this video, did you use central or peripheral route thinking? Why? Make sure to discuss this in terms of your motivation and your ability to process the message. This activity must be submitted to eCampus as either a text submission or an attached file no later than 11:59pm.
A Tale of Two Routes Paper

​This will be the 1st stage of your business plan development. In this submission, you will detail the product/service, create a mission statement, and summarize your preliminary research in the form of an Executive Summary.​

​This will be the 1st stage of your business plan development. In this submission, you will detail the product/service, create a mission statement, and summarize your preliminary research in the form of an Executive Summary.​.

Overview:This will be the 1st stage of your business plan development. In this submission, you will detail the product/service, create a mission statement, and summarize your preliminary research in the form of an Executive Summary.Instructions:The Executive Summary should, at a minimum, answer the following:What is your business, product, or service?Product/service name.How will you source the intermediate products/services that comprise yourproduct or service, if applicable?What/who is your market?Why is your product/service needed in the market that you are attempting toenter? What problem are you trying to solve?What are some keys to success?Requirements:Submit a Word document in APA format.Six to eight pages in length, not counting the cover sheet and reference pages.As this is an executive summary, in-text citations are not required; however,when outside sources are used, they should be listed on a References page attached to the end.
​This will be the 1st stage of your business plan development. In this submission, you will detail the product/service, create a mission statement, and summarize your preliminary research in the form of an Executive Summary.​