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SNHU Field Evaluation Several Potential Challenges Discussion

SNHU Field Evaluation Several Potential Challenges Discussion.

I’m working on a social science writing question and need support to help me understand better.

By Day 3Post a blog post that includes:An explanation of potential challenges for evaluation during your field education experienceAn explanation of personal action plans you might take to address evaluation in your field education experienceBy Day 4Respond to the blog post of three colleagues in one or more of the following ways:Share an insight from having read your colleague’s posting.Validate an idea in your colleague’s post with your own experience.Colleague 1:Amber An explanation of potential challenges for evaluation during your field education experienceMy field supervisor is very busy and juggles many roles, so I don’t get clear feedback from her directly. I do get some suggestions and tips from the other therapists that I shadow during my field study, but never fully elevated. During my site, my visit my field instructor brought up that I was late a few times, but it was never addressed directly to me, although she said it was addressed during the site visit. I get feedback about the work but from the other therapists. According to Garthwait, “you may not feel like the supervisor will devote enough time to you and your learning needs” (2017, p37). An explanation of personal action plans you might take to address evaluation in your field education experienceTo better get more feedback on my evaluations I can communicate more with my field supervisor and ask questions about my work. Although evaluation does not always feel comfortable, it can be used to improve my work and be better. I can use the feedback I do receive by “using it to identify my own professional growth needs”(2017p37).Garthwait, C. L. (2017). The social work practicum: A guide and workbook for students (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.Chapter 3, “Learning from Supervision” (pp. 28-40Colleague 2: Ashlynn There are many different forms of evaluation in social work. I have encountered many challenges throughout my Field Internship and potentially will face more. Evaluation was a huge challenge in the beginning of my field experience. My supervisor was not as open as she was in communicating with me as she is now. Conversation was awkward and appeared to be forced. However, once we began working with one another more and actively communicating things became much better. Additionally, in my field experience I have faced the challenge of clients/ families not wanting to participate in assessment nor services making evaluation almost impossible.As an action plan, I always make reasonable efforts. If a client is not ready to get help or participate in services as social worker’s we cannot make them, but only be there to encourage them when they are ready. Reasonable efforts include making follow up calls, contacting support and communicating with my supervisor. Additionally, for things that are not clear to me, or that I do not fully understand I ask questions. Having effective social work skills is very beneficial.ReferenceGarthwait, C. L. (2017). The social work practicum: A guide and workbook for students (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: PearsonColleague 3: Jacqueline An Explanation of Potential Challenges for Evaluation During Your Field Education ExperienceEvaluation occurs in different ways during the field education experience. I receive evaluation from my field instructor on my performance at the group home and therapy office. I also evaluate the clients and residents that I have interactions with while interning. Both of which can pose separate types of challenges. Receiving constructive criticism can be difficult for some. A potential challenge with receiving the evaluation and criticism from m field instructor would be my inability to do so and apply it. However it is imperative to use this feedback to critique and affirm my own practice (Garthwait, 2017, p.36). A potential challenge that I face in my evaluation of the clients and residents is that it may be difficult to measure outcomes in such a short amount of time. We only have 11 weeks in each semester to get involved in our client interventions and many of the circumstances require much longer than that. An Explanation of Personal Action Plans You Might Take to Address Evaluation in Your Field Education ExperienceI believe an action plan for the potential challenges faced with the evaluation from the instructor is to take notes on the information being shared and allow processing time. I write notes with questions to ensure I understand what is being said, and ask any questions I may have about improving my practice. As far as an action plan for the potential challenge of evaluating the clients I can conduct a pre/post survey of the clients I was able to work with to see what they have learned and taken from the class now and again at the final weeks. I can also follow up with my field instructor after I stop interning to see how influential I have been on them.Garthwait, C. L. (2017). The social work practicum: A guide and workbook for students (7th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
SNHU Field Evaluation Several Potential Challenges Discussion

International business. I’m stuck on a Business question and need an explanation.

BEFORE YOU SUBMIT YOUR REPORT, Please make sure that the article meets the conditions of the publishing source, publishing time, and relevance to the assigned corresponding readings that are presented in both the course schedule and the assignment schedule (located under the “Making the Connection”). Failing to meet any of these three conditions will result in a grade of zero on the assignment. see the file to know more i will upload the chapters. and please write a one report from the chapters I have uploaded. Thank you
International business

I need help with my work I need help with Topics (Thermochemistry)(gases)( The quantum-mechanical model of an Atom).

I’m working on a chemistry question and need an explanation to help me study.

Hey so I am looking for someone to help me with my exam because it is an extremely important exam and it worth a lot of points I am looking for someone to come at the same time I start my exam and help me do it. I will be sending the questions and it is only 20 question exam so I will put in a lot of money but I need to make sure to master the exam. Requires 1.The correct amount of sig figs2. I need scratch work for every question3. The exam is 3 Hours 4.It has to be your own work 5. The mosssssst important thing it has to use my teacher ways to solve things ( I will send a 30 min video that would explain how she solve things) I need you to watch it 6. Topics (Thermochemistry)(gases)( The quantum-mechanical model of an Atom) 7. Exam 3 hours8.If I get the grade I want I will add 10 bucks to the budget as a tip
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Harvard Law School Confidential Instructions for the Venture Capitalist Summary

Harvard Law School Confidential Instructions for the Venture Capitalist Summary.

This write-up is based on a simulation role play, and the write-up is graded. You will find the case, your secret role, and the platform to negotiate in Idecisiongames.comEveryone will play a role as a VC or a founder. Another student will play the opposite role. Please prepare in advance for the secret role that will be distributed prior to the game.Based on your experience during the simulation, you need to submit a 2- 4 pages summary on the following topics. What was your primary and secondary goal? How did you plan to achieve them?How would you characterize your negotiation strategy?To what extent did you address the needs of the other players?What would you do differently next time?
Harvard Law School Confidential Instructions for the Venture Capitalist Summary

SVA Vincent Van Gogh Starry Night Presentation

essay help online SVA Vincent Van Gogh Starry Night Presentation.

I’m working on a art presentation and need support to help me understand better.

All students must be present on the last day. This will either be a one-on-one meeting or everyone together.Pick an artist or selection of artwork(s) of your choice from any museum collection. You can choose any print (lithography, etching, woodblock), painting (oil, watercolor), or drawing (crayon, charcoal, pencil) created between 1800-1970.Your presentation should provide careful visual analysis, comparison, and detailed descriptions of your artwork and evidence of research that situates it within its cultural and historical context (meaning what is the social, political, cultural, economic, and environmental situations.). Every presentation should include a detailed biographic understanding of the artist(s). Other questions I would like you to think about: What did you get out of your research? What kind of relevance did your research present? How might this class inform your own practice and ideas going forward? You can include prints, drawings, paintings, sculptures, or mixed media. Some suggestions are listed below. You may also come up with your own idea but we should discuss it first.the topic i chose is Vincent van Gogh, also I need a speech draft and ppt for the presentation.
SVA Vincent Van Gogh Starry Night Presentation

You are required to: • Assess the macroeconomic performance of Australia before the COVID-19 pandemic Your essay can include

You are required to: • Assess the macroeconomic performance of Australia before the COVID-19 pandemic Your essay can include the following illustrative features: • Up to three (3) figures (diagrams, graphs, or tables) in total. You can use a mixture of diagrams, graphs, and tables provided the total number is no more than three. • You can include more than one variable in a graph or table. • You must produce your own figures rather than “cut and paste” from other sources. You can focus on the assignment PDF,others will help you.Thanks!

Astronomy: Ancient History of Science Essay

Table of Contents Introduction Main body Conclusion Endnotes Bibliography Introduction The origins of modern astronomy go back to ancient times, to the 3rd and 2nd millennia before Christ. This period of history was connected with complex cultures that developed in Egypt and Babylon. The main problem is that this knowledge is fragmentary because only a few writings survive from this period. The next period was connected with discoveries and world order developed by Plato and Aristotle. Aristotle (384–322 BC) rightly points out that the shadow of the Earth cast on the Moon during an eclipse is invariably circular, and that only if the Earth is a sphere can this be the case1. Not only did the Greeks know the shape of the Earth, but Eratosthenes arrived at an excellent estimate of the Earth’s actual size. Ever since then, everyone has known that the Earth is spherical. So, it was the sky. The classic Greek model of the universe: was a spherical Earth at the center of a spherical cosmos. At the very center was the sphere of Earth; around it, the shell of water, then the shell of air, and finally the shell of fire. Bodies were made of these elements in varying proportions. Plato described his ideas in Timaeus stating that humans lived in a cosmos governed by the law2. Main body The next step was made by Eudoxus who formulated for each planet a concept of either three or four concentric spheres, which he used in a mathematical demonstration that the planets’ movements were law-like after all. He supposed that each planet is set on the equator of the innermost sphere, which rotated with uniform speed, carrying the planet with it3. The poles of this sphere were thought of as embedded in the next sphere and carried round by it as it too uniformly rotated, and so on for the third and the fourth. The angle of the axis of each sphere was carefully chosen, as was its speed of rotation, with the outermost sphere in each case generating the daily path of the planet around the Earth4. For each of the five lesser planets, two of the spheres rotated with equal and opposite speeds about axes that differed only slightly. Aristotle has exercised a quite different limitation: the spheres of the models were constructions in the minds of mathematicians and did not explain in physical terms how the planets come to move as we observe them do. His solution was to convert the mathematical spheres into physical reality and to combine them to make one composite nest for the entire system5. The great contribution was made by Apollonius of Perge and Hipparchus of Nicea. They created complex models of the universe based on eccentric circles. Apollonius of Perga developed two geometrical tools that supplied this flexibility. In one, the planet moved uniformly on a circle, but the circle was now eccentric to the Earth6. As a result, the planet would appear to move faster when its path brought it nearer the Earth, and slower when it was away on the far side of its orbit. In the other, the planet was located on a little circle, or epicycle, whose center was carried around the Earth on a different circle7. It was through Hipparchus that the geometrical astronomy of the Greeks began to incorporate precise parameters derived from the long centuries during which the Babylonians had kept their observational records. Hipparchus compiled a list of lunar eclipses observed at Babylon from the 8th century BC, and these records were crucial to his study of the motions of the Sun and Moon, for it is during an eclipse that these two bodies are exactly in line with the Earth. Hipparchus’s single most important discovery was that of the precession of the equinoxes, the slow movement among the stars of the two opposite places where the Sun crosses the celestial equator. Also, great discoveries were made by Aristarchus of Samos proposed a heliocentric model of the universe, and Eratosthenes who estimated the Earth’s actual size8. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More The period between Hipparchus and Ptolemy is considered a dark age for astronomy. The greatest world by Ptolemy, the Almagest, provided geometrical models and related tables by which the movements of the Sun, Moon and the five lesser planets could be calculated for the indefinite future. Its catalog contains over 1,000 fixed stars arranged in 48 constellations, giving the longitude, latitude, and apparent brightness of each. In a planetary model, the equant was the point symmetrically opposite the eccentric Earth, and the planet was required to move on its circle so that from the equant point it would appear to be moving uniformly across the sky9. In the 13th century, an anonymous author made good some of the defects of the Sphere with his Theory of the Planets. This gave a simple account of the Ptolemaic models of the various planets, with clear definitions. Meanwhile, at the court of King Alfonso X of Castile, the old Toledan Tables were replaced by the Alfonsine Tables; modern computer analysis has shown that these tables, which would be standard for the next 300 years, were calculated on Ptolemaic models with only the occasional updating of parameters10. Oresme saw a significant implication of the concept of impetus. If the Earth were indeed rotating, the archer as he stood on its surface would be moving with it. As a result, as he prepared to fire the arrow, he would unknowingly confer on the arrow a sideways impetus. Endowed with this impetus, the arrow in flight would travel horizontally as well as vertically, keeping pace with the Earth, and so would fall to the ground at the very place from which it had been fired11. The next stage of science development was connected with Nicolaus Copernicus (1473–1543) and new scientific discoveries. Critics admit that many years passed, during which Copernicus developed his mathematical astronomy, remote from the intellectual centers of Europe. Copernicus’s book, De Revolutionibus, was concerned with geometrical models of the planetary orbits. The Prutenic Tables of Erasmus Reinhold (1511–53) proved that the heliocentric approach “could pass the practical test”12. Copernicus outlined the consequences that follow from the basic assumption that the Earth is an ordinary planet orbiting the Sun. The heliocentric universe was a true cosmos: “In the centre of all resides the Sun. For in this most beautiful temple, who would place this lamp in another or better place than that from which it can illuminate the whole at one and the same time? As a matter of fact, not inappropriately do some call it the lantern of the universe; others, its mind; and others still, its ruler”13. These discoveries were made and proved by other scientists including Galileo Galilei. Conclusion It is possible to say that it was difficult to overturn the geocentric model because scientists had not had a possibility to prove their observations and investigate outer space. Most of their discoveries were hypothetically proved by mathematical and geometric formulas and estimates. The development of a telescope of 8 magnification opened new possibilities for scientists to discover the universe. Until the invention of the telescope, each generation of astronomers had looked at much the same sky as their predecessors14. If they knew more, it was chiefly because they had more books to read, more records to mine. In contrast, Galileo saw with his telescope wonders vouchsafed to no one before him: stars that had remained hidden from sight, four moons that orbited the planet Jupiter, strange appendages to Saturn that would be recognized as rings only half a century later, moon-like phases of Venus, mountains on the Moon not very different from those on Earth, even spots on the supposedly perfect Sun. He was able to confirm the suggestion of Aristotle that the Milky Way is composed of myriads of tiny stars15. So, scientific revolution opened new possibilities for scientists to resolve the physical objections. We will write a custom Essay on Astronomy: Ancient History of Science specifically for you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Endnotes Couper, H., N. Henbest, Clarke, A.C. The History of Astronomy. (Firefly Books, 2007), p..6 Ibid., p. 7. Ibid., p. 10. Heilbron, J. L. The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. (Oxford University Press, USA, 2005), p. 11. Ibid., p. 15. Ibid., p. 19. Evans, J. The History and Practice of Ancient Astronomy. (Oxford University Press, USA, 1998), p.52. Pannekoek, A. A History of Astronomy. (Dover Publications; New Ed edition, 1989), p. 24. Heilbron, J. L. The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. (Oxford University Press, USA, 2005), p. 19. Ibid., 22. Pannekoek, A. A History of Astronomy. (Dover Publications; New Ed edition, 1989), p. 26. Ibid., p. 25. Copernicus cited Evans, J. The History and Practice of Ancient Astronomy. (Oxford University Press, USA, 1998), p.53. Pannekoek, A. A History of Astronomy. (Dover Publications; New Ed edition, 1989), p.34. Ibid., p. 37. Bibliography Couper, H., N. Henbest, Clarke, A.C. The History of Astronomy. Firefly Books, 2007. Heilbrin, J. L. The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy. Oxford University Press, USA, 2005. Evans, J. The History and Practice of Ancient Astronomy. Oxford University Press, USA, 1998. Pannekoek, A. A History of Astronomy. Dover Publications; New Ed edition, 1989.