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SMC Industry Attractiveness and Competitive Strength Assessment as A Team Discussion

SMC Industry Attractiveness and Competitive Strength Assessment as A Team Discussion.

I’m working on a management writing question and need support to help me understand better.

Part One:After completing the Industry Attractiveness and Competitive Strength Assessment as a team, elect one team member to post your results to the discussion (click “Add Attachment” in the post and include the team name in the title (i.e. Team #: Lesson 2 Discussion).What are the results of your team’s Industry Attractiveness and Competitive Strength Assessment for SWA in the domestic airline industry? According to the grid on the back of the assessment, what is the likelihood of success for SWA in this industry?What is SWA’s competitive business strategy? What are SWA’s sources of competitive advantage or core competencies?To what degree are any of SWA’s sources of competitive advantage sustainable? Can competitors easily duplicate the value-creating skills/core capabilities or superior assets that have driven the firm’s success?What are the most important challenges that SWA is facing over the next 2-3 years? How can the airline successfully manage continued growth in international markets while leveraging its core capabilities and unique culture?Part Two: On your own, read your fellow team members’ postings and comment on two which particularly resonate with your work experience or analysis of the case.
SMC Industry Attractiveness and Competitive Strength Assessment as A Team Discussion

Table of Contents Specification of an Economic model What benefits did the globalization affect? At what costs did the globalization occur? How did that affect the global economy today? Conclusion Reference List Globalization is the integration of regional economies through trade by reduction of international trade barriers in order to increase material wealth of the people and improve the economies of the nations through good global relations, competition and specialization. The objective of globalization is to enhance the interdependence, business operations and connectivity on an international level with respect to the socioeconomic, cultural, religion, biological, environmental and scientific aspects (Fiss,
Pressure ulcers are an injury that damages skin and the layer(s) of tissue beneath, which have been exposed to pressure (NHS, 2014). They can occur in patients of varied ages; however, the most vulnerable age group who are at risk of developing pressure ulcers are patients aged 75 and above (Hope, 2014). Elderly patients tend to have co-morbidities due to the ageing process, which can sometimes leave them with limited mobility or bedridden and this then can put them at further risk of developing pressure ulcers (Jaul, 2010). Due to having a growing elderly population, it is extremely important to address the risks of pressure ulcers. There is no particular environment in which pressure ulcers occur, as they are a concern in all settings where social care is being provided, medical treatments are carried out – including private homes. This paper will review the evidence regarding the risks and management of pressure ulcers. The focus of this paper will be elderly patients and the following topics will be discussed; risk assessment, patient assessment, pressure recognition and removal, non-surgical treatments/advice, complications of pressure ulcers and surgery. On recognition of a pressure ulcer or the possibility of one developing on a patient, a suitably trained health or medical professional should do a documented risk assessment (NICE, 2014). This risk assessment should cover two interlinking areas, ‘risk factors’ and ‘signs/symptoms’. It is important to assess an elderly patient’s current health status and not just the status of their health as documented previously on records or on admittance to see a professional, as a variety of factors can affect the development of a pressure ulcer – some factors more rapidly than others. Questioning into previous medical history and also looking at previous medical notes is often very informative and usually allows the professional to know of any co-morbidity which could present a further risk or act as an indirect cause of the development of a pressure ulcer. Diabetes and musculoskeletal disorders are often flagged up on assessments as a factor which can impact a pressure ulcer (Benbow, 2012). Sometimes due to the elderly patient suffering from a type of dementia, their ability to communicate or remember life events deteriorates and therefore they cannot provide the professional assessing the ulcer with key medical information. Also, some patients may be in trauma or are not conscious; this, again, makes the information gathering stage of the patient’s current health status difficult for the assessing professional. In such complex cases, the patient’s wider network such as relations or the multi-disciplinary team of health and social care professionals who have previously supported the patient may have more knowledge on the patient’s life history. Nursing home staff are required by the Care Quality Commission to keep records of their residents’ care plans and more specialist homes have routine logs written about their residents; these often can act as a good indicator of physical, mental and behavioural status and changes which have occurred with the elderly patient (CQC, 2015). Determining any other condition which an elderly patient may suffer from is important, because this needs to be considered in the patient’s care plan and management of the Pressure ulcer as it could have direct impact on the healing of a pressure ulcer. For example, if the elderly patient has diabetes, their wound healing process maybe prolonged (Leik, 2013). Furthermore, as elderly individuals have thinner skin; this already puts them at greater risk of skin damage due to pressure. Musculoskeletal disease such as osteoarthritis is usually diagnosed in elderly individuals and it can limit the mobility of the patient or their ability to do specific activities (NHS, 2014). This may result in patients being in the same position for long periods of time, which may then put pressure on that area of the body, putting them at greater risk of developing a pressure ulcer. Also, elderly individuals who are less mobile are more likely to have poor circulation, which can impact on the time taken for a pressure ulcer to heal. Therefore, blood flow should also be taken into consideration when doing the risk assessment. Above are some examples of how the management of Pressure ulcers can become complex; there are more diseases such as terminal diseases and other medical conditions that need to be taken into consideration when planning the care or prevention of a pressure ulcer. Often both the lack of nutritional intake and loss of weight are two interrelated common concerns in elderly patients, unless the cause is due to a different factor such as underlying pathology of disease. Therefore, in addition to including these factors in the risk assessment, health education to encourage the patient to eat needs to be provided to the patient, their relations and health and social care staff supporting the patient. Health advice/education/guidance is important because an underweight elderly individual is more likely to have less tissue around their bones and possibly poorer blood vessel quality, hence making them more at risk of damage from pressure and also poorer healing (MNT, 2014). Also, a lack of protein in an elderly patient’s diet, which supports tissue growth and repair, can also cause greater damage to their skin from pressure. Low nutritional intake can also cause fatigue and frailty in elderly individuals and this can impact an elderly individual’s engagement and ability to do daily activities (Morelli and Sidani, 2011), hence impacting their psycho-social status, which may disengage them from supporting their own health, whether it be by following the guidance of a medical practitioner or by being active in their healthcare decisions generally (Morelli and Sidani, 2011). This then can make patient centred care difficult for those providing care for the elderly patient, as patient choice/preference is compromised and indication of pain, which is usually expressed verbally via description or recommended pain scales such as ‘Braden’ or ‘Waterlow’, may not also be provided by the patient (Nice, 2014 and Benbow, 2012). Therefore, the patient’s involvement in managing the pressure ulcer is vital. Pain management is difficult in Pressure ulcer management if the elderly individual has an altered perception of pain due to a spinal cord injury or other related nerve damage injuries. This may prevent the patient from recognizing that they have an ulcer developing, hence delaying the treatment of the ulcer (MNT, 2014). Therefore, it is good practice if the elderly individual is a patient in hospital to routinely ask the patient if they have seen any abnormalities on their skin and also recommend them to change positions regularly. Alongside the detailed risk assessment, a pressure ulcer assessment/skin assessment should be done on recognition of a pressure ulcer developing. This is not only to manage the Pressure ulcer but also to be aware of those individuals who may have difficulty, as mentioned above, in detecting changes in their skin or possibly even possess a disability. Complaints of pain from the patient should be considered in the skin assessment, followed by a categorization of the ulcer as a stage 1,2,3 or 4 Pressure ulcer (NICE, 2014). This will include assessing discolouration, variations in heat, firmness and skin moisture. The categorization of the Pressure ulcer is extremely important because it allows suitable preventative measures to be put within the individual’s care planning, to try to maintain the skin’s integrity and to support healing (NHS, 2014). The overall patient assessment will directly impact decisions on the frequency of positioning for the patient and the suitability of the support surface on which the patient is sitting or lying (Benbow, 2012). These changes are vital to pressure removal and hence, managing the development of the Pressure ulcer better because they will be included in a repositioning timetable that health and social care professionals will work to as part of the care plan. The frequency of positioning varies based on the risk, patient’s physical ability/state and also their acceptance to be regularly repositioned; for example, a patient in a wheelchair may need to be repositioned every 15 minutes due to the pressure of sitting in the same position for long periods of time. Elderly patients who are bedridden should be repositioned every couple of hours, depending on the need determined in the risk assessment (NICE, 2014). A physiotherapist can often advise on repositioning that will be safe and that will also allow pressure release. Equipment can also support pressure removal. Cushions on wheelchairs not only provide comfort but they can also lessen the pressure on the hip and upper leg area of the body. However, some specialists advise that air, water or foam filled support devices are better than traditional cushions (Benbow, 2012). Small pillows/foam pads can also support areas of the body from touching each other, such as between the knees or ankles. These can also be used for comfort and support when laying in different angled positions; for example, when a patient is lying on their side, their legs may need further support (Benbow, 2012). Reclining chairs/automated chairs can also be set at different positions to support pressure removal. Patients, relatives and supporting professionals need to ensure that the skin of the patient is regularly checked, as repositioning regularly can also cause skin damage due to the skin of an elderly individual being thinner. Specialised mattresses can also reduce pressure in comparison to standard mattresses. Furthermore, some specialist mattresses can be connected to an air flow system which can automatically regulate the pressure, hence making the care and management of pressure ulcers in bedridden patients easier for health professionals or carers/relatives. This may be a change that medical/health professionals recommend to elderly patients at home or even for patients in long term care/rehabilitation; however, research is still lacking on how much contribution mattress change actually has on directly lessening the risk of pressure ulcer development (Vanderwee et al, 2008 and UCSF, 2011) in comparison to other cost effective changes. Depending on the wound of the ulcer and the skin damage, often dressings and ointments are used to manage the pressure ulcer and to manage infection. Antibiotics may be prescribed, but not often, as usually antiseptic creams can be applied directly on the wound to prevent the spread of infection to connecting tissues. Ointments and creams may also be used to prevent or treat skin damage such as incontinence-associated dermatitis. The skin assessment should be able to identify those at risk of developing such dermatitis, as these patients often have one or more of the following conditions: incontinence, oedema or dry skin (NICE, 2014). Dressings which have been specially designed to promote wound healing and cell regrowth should be used on a pressure ulcer wound. Examples of suitable dressings include hydrocolloid dressings and aliginate dressings (NHS, 2014). These dressings also can support the regulation of skin moisture, which is important to manage the Pressure ulcer. Research and development into wound repair technology is advancing and specially designed dressings give less trauma to the patient upon removal. Therefore, the correct dressing is vital as unsuitable dressings may cause further skin breakdown. As briefly mentioned earlier in this paper, the patient’s diet may need altering to ensure that the elderly patient is taking nutrients which will support wound healing. Hydration is also important to maintain skin moisture and avoid flaky skin (Convatec, 2012). Hydrotherapy can also be used to keep skin clean, with possible natural removal of dead cells. In some cases, the wound healing process may be compromised due to necrotic tissue and this dead tissue will need to be removed via a debridement method. Debridement methods vary depending on the clinical situation. Larvae therapy can be used as an alternative method to debridement; this therapy consists of putting maggots on the wound for a few days via a dressing and gauze. Maggots can also promote healing due to the release of a substance that kills bacteria. Sometimes when grade 3 or 4 Pressure Ulcer wounds do not heal or they become complicated cases, surgery is needed. This is usually either surgery which directly closes the wound or flap reconstruction. To conclude, this paper has attempted to cover the overall management of pressure ulcers in elderly patients. Despite, the treatments and clinical practice carried out by medical/health professionals being similar to younger patients, the risks of pressure ulcer development and healing due to the ageing process are different. Also, co-morbidity is more identifiable in elderly patients and skin structure/composition differs due to the thinning of the skin. There are clear guidelines on managing pressure ulcers by NICE; however, further research needs to be done to optimize the management of pressure ulcers in elderly patients (Cullum, 2013). Bibliography Benbow, M. (2012) Management of Pressure ulcers. [Online] Available from: http://www.nursinginpractice.com/article/management-pressure-ulcers Care Quality Commission. (2015) Regulation 17 – good governance. [Online] Available from: http://www.cqc.org.uk/content/regulation-17-good-governance Convatec. (2012) The Role of Modern Wound Dressings in Stage I Pressure Ulcers and Patients at Risk of Pressure Ulcer Formation. [Online] Available from: http://www.convatec.co.uk/media/9572137/aquacel-foam-dressing-shown-to-protect-against-ski-11546.pdf Cullum, N. (2013) Study reveals pressure ulcer research uncertainties. [Online] Available from: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/article/?id=10016 Jaul, E. (2010) Assessment and management of pressure ulcers in the elderly: current strategies. Journal of Drugs and Aging. 27 (4). p. 311-325. Leik, M.T.C. (2013) Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Certification Intensive Review: Fast Facts and Practice Questions. 2nd ed. Springer Publishing Company: New York. Medical News Today. (2014) What are bedsores (pressure ulcers)? What causes bed sores? [Online] Available from: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/173972.php Morelli, V and Sidani, M. (2011) Fatigue and Chronic Fatigue in the Elderly: Definitions, Diagnoses, and treatments. Clinics in Geriatric Medicine. 27 (4). p. 673 – 686. National Health Institute. (2014) Osteoarthritis. [Online] Available from: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/osteoarthritis/Pages/Introduction.aspx National Health Service. (2014) Pressure ulcers – Treatment. [Online] Available from: http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Pressure-ulcers/Pages/Treatment.aspx National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. (2014) Pressure ulcers: prevention and management of pressure ulcers. [Online] Available from: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg179/resources/guidance-pressure-ulcers-prevention-and-management-of-pressure-ulcers-pdf University of California at San Francisco. (2011) A critical analysis of Patient Safety Practices – evidence report no.43. [Online] Available from: http://archive.ahrq.gov/clinic/ptsafety Vanderwee, K, Grypdonck, M, Defloor, T. (2008) Alternating pressure air mattresses as prevention for pressure ulcers: A literature review. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 45 (5). p. 784-801

American InterContinental Introduction To Cloud Computing Presentation

American InterContinental Introduction To Cloud Computing Presentation.

Imagine that you are working in the role of a senior level network administrator for the IT Guru corporation. The IT Guru corporation is a mid-sized Information Technology consultancy with locations in North America, Europe and Asia with 5000 employees and 36 offices founded in 1999. Your organization is expanding its technology foot print, exploring emerging technologies and consulting clients on information technology strategies and solutions. In your role you provide recommendations on technology selection and implementation to support the needs of your organization and you are also an advisor to the consulting teams that assess and recommend technology strategies for their clients. You have been invited to a meeting with your Chief Information Officer and Vice President of Global Sales to discuss the concepts of cloud computing and explain the different cloud services that are available. You will be provided with 30 minutes to present your ideas and this will require 10 slides. To complete this assignment, complete the following:Create a 10 slide PowerPoint presentation that includes the following:Introduction slideDiscuss the concept of cloud computing and the types of cloud services available to include SAAS, PAAS and IAAS. (3 slides)Provide an explanation of the components of cloud infrastructure that will need to be adopted to create a cloud platform. (3 slides)Explain cloud computing strategies to include IOT devices, security, performance, and management. (2 slides) Closing slide
American InterContinental Introduction To Cloud Computing Presentation

Development of Uzbekistan Government

write my term paper Development Uzbekistan Government Development of Potential of Local Government in Uzbekistan This paper will be on Development of Potential of Local Government and Self Government Institutions of Citizens in Uzbekistan; their significant role and future reforms in building democratic socio-economically stable country. After Soviet Union’s disintegration in 1991 and acquiring the Independence in Uzbekistan, the status of Local Governments and Self Government Institutes of Citizens noticeably increased: these institutions were recognized as one of the core factors in construction of the country and in building democratic society. From rich experience of many developed countries, one can see that prosperity of civilians and society significantly depends on efficient work of these local government bodies. Efficient activity of Local Governments in territory, which is under their responsibility, certainly leads to honest allocation of recourses and their stability, improvement of entrepreneurships, more active participation of civil society and their representatives in Public Administration activities. After Independence many efforts were made by Government of Uzbekistan to develop Public Administration System adopting various laws on juridical status, as well as financial status of Local Governance and Self Governance of Citizens. Uzbekistan has been introducing and applying principles of decentralization and separation of authority and responsibilities between Central and Local Government bodies (as well as Self Government Systems) taking into account International models and Traditional systems of Public Administration. In particular, one of the ancient and traditional Self Government Institution of Citizens “Mahalla” looks like an independent NGO however, in reality, it is government-sanctioned and supported. “Mahalla” being a unique traditional self administration mechanism has been given more and more authority and power by central and local government. Self Government Institutions “Mahalla” have been becoming the core element of process in decentralization of authority and development of local communities. Currently, “Mahalla” has much legislative authority which enables for promoting better operative and effective management in their own territories such are: social service, stimulation of entrepreneurships, and employment of population. However, despite many successful achievements in this sphere, Central Government still has many doubts in providing large-scale decentralization, giving political, as well as financial power to lower tier administrative bodies, which can be understood by severe bureaucratic and hierarchy inherit of former Soviet system, as well as lack of developed International experience in the mentioned sphere. While looking at the tendency of current reforms in Uzbekistan, one can conclude that there is a well-formed citizens’ local self-government body representing democratic and civil society in the country. However, there are many obstacle and challenges for effective activities of Local Government and Self Government Institutions. Today many International Organizations and NGOs such as United Nations, OSCE, International Crisis Group and Human Rights Watch, many other organizations, as well as International Community are critical about the Self Governance Institutions “Mahalla” reforms in Uzbekistan with regard to the following issues: Decentralization of functions of Public Administration units from Central Government to citizens self-government assemblies and institutions without providing adequate funds; Unclear differentiation of authorities and functions between Local Government and Citizens’ self-government assemblies; Excessive involvement and interference of central and local governmental bodies into activities and affairs of citizens’ self government institutions; Lack of Financial capacity and autonomy of citizens’ self government institutions; Non formal and sometimes illegal subordination of citizens’ self-government institutions to central and local government bodies and their non formal operative role as administrative units of the state bodies; Lack of education and training in the field of Public Administration for the heads of Local Government and Self-Government Institutions (Mahalla). In this respect, all abovementioned challenges and problems have resulted to stagnation of local development of Uzbekistan and necessitated the adoption of new policy measures and legal acts. Taking into account these factors and analyzing the main reasons and factors of the derivation of the problems of local self-government reforms in Uzbekistan, the research/master thesis will provide proper solutions to the above problems, reviewing current legislation on citizens’ self-government to determine legal shortcomings so as to offer new legal and financial measures and mechanisms to improve the system. Uzbekistan has a unique traditional model of local self governance in the form of citizens’ assembly “Mahalla” in cities, villages and rural settlements. As part of commitments to democratic society and market economy, it is necessary to develop and implement a comprehensive government policy aimed at the establishment of effective and functional local self-governance bodies that adhere to the social and political system of Uzbekistan and stem from the ancient national traditions of the Uzbek people. Decentralization and delegation of power and authority to lower level of Public Administration, and expansion of the power and opportunities for local self government institutions and local government authorities in Uzbekistan today must be combined with the establishment of specific judicial control, which should be independent from executive central and local bodies. Decentralization and strengthening the role of potential of local government institutions and Local Councilors in Uzbekistan should be based on specific legislative normative acts, at the same time financial independence of civil-based organizations and the development of independent mass media. Without the simultaneous development of all the aforementioned components, decentralization and the promotion of local self governance may result in continuing management by the authorities of the local community organizations, limiting the citizens’ participation in local governance. Such a reduction of people’s participation in community actions will continue to increase social tension. If the State make special amendments and reforms local government and self government institutions “Mahalla” taking into account above problems and challenges, undoubtedly these institutes of self government of citizens will in the long run bring huge democratic changes in society and create strong network of civil society institutions, which in their turn make core contributions for the socio-economic development of Uzbekistan. At the moment, the main task is encouragement of Central Government and providing recommendations for further decentralization (legal as well as financial) and the formation of the mechanism in realization of given authority and responsibilities. This Research Goal is to analyze the current situation and provide specific recommendations on how to develop the potential of the local government and self government bodies through development of institutional and financial aspects, addressing legislative, socio-economic development issues, as well as increasing the citizens’ living standards. This research will discuss and analyze the Local Government Bodies in Uzbekistan and especially Traditional Self Government system “Mahalla” showing the problems and challenges of the system and will provide analyses and recommendations in order how to improve this Public Administration system according to Traditional, as well as International Experience (European Charter and Japanese experience on Local Governance). Methodology of the Research is based on institutional, legislative and financial analyses: First to study and analyze the legislative structure of the Pubic Administration system from the highest level to the lowest level, as well as the relationships among them; Secondly, to conduct the studies of the structure of the lowest level of Public Administration “Mahalla, presenting more clear picture of the Public Administration system, providing macroeconomic situation, budget system and tax system of the state which analyzes the financial matters of local government in Uzbekistan; Lastly, having more clear idea about the main issues and problems of the Local Government in Uzbekistan, the main goal of the research is to provide specific recommendations on changing, developing and strengthening the institutional, legislative and financial systems towards prospective Development of Potential of Local Government in Uzbekistan. The main resource base of the research is on: Legal-Normative Constitutional documents, Civil and Tax codes and other main laws of the Republic of Uzbekistan; policy papers, articles and books relating Local Government of Uzbekistan in English, Russian and Uzbek languages; Macroeconomic and Financial statistics of the state from database of Ministries and Municipalities of Uzbekistan, International Organizations, UN headquarter (UNECE), reports of the USAID and JICA projects regarding Development of Local Government system in Uzbekistan. Bibliography Constitution of the Republic of Uzbekistan, 1992 Constitution of the Autonomous Republic of Karakalpakistan, 1992 Law of the Republic of Uzbekistan “on Self Governance of Citizens of the Republic of Uzbekistan” (adopted in 1999) Law of the Republic of Uzbekistan “On Ratification of the Instruction on Calculation and Payment of Local Taxes and Duties to the Budget”, February 2003 Law of the Republic of Uzbekistan “on Local Taxes and Duties”, adopted in May 1993 Law of the Republic of Uzbekistan “on Provision on Mahalla Committees in the Cities, Towns and Kishlaks of Uzbekistan” 1993 Civil Code of Uzbekistan, March 1997 “Uzbekistan: National Independence, Economy, Politics and Ideology” President Islam Karimov 1999 “The Role of Self-governments in the Construction of a Lawful State” (Rol’ organov samoupravleniya grazhdan v stroitelstve pravovogo gosudarstva), Journal in Russian, by Khalilov, E. In “Obshestvenniye nauki v Uzbekistane (Public Sciences in Uzbekistan) 1999, Tashkent “Central Power and Regional and Local Government in Uzbekistan.” Unity or Separation: Center-Periphery Relations in the Former Soviet Union, Robertson and Kangas, D. Kempton and T.Clark, Eds, Praeger Publishers, 2001 “Main directions of local government reform in Uzbekistan”, CER. Working paper 2004/07 “The New Central Asia”, Oliver Roy, London, April 2000 The World Factbook, (Jan. 2007 est.) https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/print/uz.html “Assessment Of Current Legal And Operational Status Of Housing Partnerships In Uzbekistan”, Rabenhorst, Carol, The Urban Institute, November, 2002. Agriculture of Uzbekistan, Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agriculture_in_Uzbekistan City population, Territory and Population of the Administrative Units of Uzbekistan, http://www.citypopulation.de/Uzbekistan.html#Land “Judicial Reform Index of Uzbekistan”, ABA/CEELI, May 2002 “Traditional Communities in Modern Uzbekistan.” Arifkhanova Zoia, Central Asia and the Caucasus. October 2000. “Identity / Difference in Central Asia: Tribes, Clans and Mahalla.” Unity or Separation, Bichel, Anthony. Center-Periphery Relations in the Former Soviet Union, D. Kempton and T. Clark, Eds, Praeger Publishers, 2001. “Estimating Revenue Capacity of Oblasts in Uzbekistan: Assessment and Recommendations.” MacNevin, Alex. Bearing Point / USAID, July 2003

CJAD 415 Columbia College Criminal Justice Question

CJAD 415 Columbia College Criminal Justice Question.

Go to Famous Trials. Select one of the following three trials to analyze: Leo Frank; The Scottsboro boys; or Sam Sheppard. Read as much as you can about your selected case on this site. Obtain at least two other research sources on the case through the internet or other research. Write a paper concerning the case where you discuss the following issues:the factual background of the case;the evidence introduced against the defendants at trial;the outcome of the case at trial and on appeal;the legal issues involved in the case and historical significance of the case in the American legal system;Conclusion.Please attribute your research and any ideas that are not your own. Use at least two other research sources on the case through the internet or other research. Be sure to use APA format for this paper, including double-spaced text, 12-point font size, and 1” margins. A reference list is required. A suitable length on this assignment is 4-5 pages. Paper 2 is worth 100 points.
CJAD 415 Columbia College Criminal Justice Question

JWI 530 Strayer University Week 6 Finance for Nonfinancial Managers Discussion

JWI 530 Strayer University Week 6 Finance for Nonfinancial Managers Discussion.

Please respond to the two peer to the foloowing questionCostsOption 1Your team has been assigned to design and launch of a new product or service. This could be an external product for sale or an internal service to support other departments. As you prepare for your first team meeting, you know that identifying and classifying costs will be an essential part of the project.Briefly explain what the new offering is (Note: this can be hypothetical or based on your current role at your company; you should not share any proprietary information)Identify and describe one fixed cost and one variable cost in your department, and explain whether they are controllable or non-controllable.Identify whether these costs are traceable to direct materials, direct labor, or overhead.
– OR –
Option 2Consider your current organization, describe how costing is used or could be used to better understand the financial breakdown of products and/or services delivered. Would this information support you in your current role and/or aspired-to role? Have you seen instances where costing is not used effectively or could be better leveraged?peer #1Tiffany Brown RE: Week 6 DiscussionCOLLAPSEGood Afternoon Everyone,I currently work in the healthcare industry. For this week’s discussion post I chose:Option 2Consider your current organization, describe how costing is used or could be used to better understand the financial breakdown of products and/or services delivered. Would this information support you in your current role and/or aspired-to role?I currently work in the Rehabilitation Center of the hospital. The costs of services are fixed. Fixed costs are unchanged; it doesn’t matter if there is an increase or a decrease in the services provided (1). The price paid by the patient varies depending on the insurance they have if the insurance company feels the service is necessary if they have a copay if they have a deductible and even if the patient has insurance. Our facility is one of the only rehabilitation facility’s that accepts Medicaid. Novant Health offers services to help patients in financial need (2). Our self-pay patients receive a 30-40% discount for services rendered. We have Financial Navigators available to help the patient plan for procedures that are predictable (2). Patients can set up payment plans to pay their bill or they can apply for Charity care (2). Patients who qualify for Charity care will receive services at 100% discount (2). Novant Health does not turn anyone away who is in need of care.Have you seen instances where costing is not used effectively or could be better leveraged?There were instances when I worked for a private practice that I saw variable pricing. My doctors would give discounts and sometimes free services to their friends. This practice was never used for patients who were in need and that part was always disturbing for me.Regards,TiffanySources:Siciliano, Gene. (2015). “Cost Accounting: A Really Short Course in Manufacturing Productivity. McGraw-Hill EducationNovant Health. (2020). “Financial Assistance for the uninsured.” https://www.novanthealth.org/home/patients–visitors/your-healthcare-costs/financial-assistance-for-the-uninsured.aspxPeer#2Claudia JurcanRE: Week 6 Discussion COLLAPSEHello Class and Prof. Linda,CostsFor this week I have prepared to share with you a project that my team and I were working on with IT to bring the tool into production. It is a software tool which was developed internally, that my team is using it for quite some time. Because we had a great success with it, I decided the make it available to other teams within our company. So what this tool does? It is predicting analytics of warranty spent and parts availability at our warehouse. Raises a flag when a part becomes low in inventory , and it sends signals to purchasing and logistics. On the other hand, for warranty spent, it predicts the future cost, and an alert will go to Quality Engineers for future investigation and improvements. As you can see the tool will satisfy a larger number of users, if it will go into production, and if it will be used in real time.Not to mention, the time and effort will be drastically improved, it will lower the cost on warranty, it will eliminates the low inventory, that means improving the variable cost.This tool will generate reports that can be used by Finance, Engineering, Brand Quality, Logistics, Supply Chain, and many more.By implementing this tool , it will help in long term with labor cost for data scientists, data analyst, machine learning, software, equipment, in one word, with the fixed cost. The fixed cost is controllable, however, today the variable cost is not controllable, however, open the tool to a larger users, that don’t require to have high skills in analytics, the variable cost could be controllable as well.
Thank you,Claudia.
References:1. EOP Videos, Week 62. Finance for Nonfinancial Managers – Chapter 83. Vital Truths About Managing your Costs, HBP4. Cost Allocation, https://xplaind.com/670705/cost-allocation
JWI 530 Strayer University Week 6 Finance for Nonfinancial Managers Discussion