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Religious Studies homework help

Religious Studies homework help. Assignment 1: LASA # 2?Capital Budgeting TechniquesAs a financial consultant, you have contracted with Wheel Industries to evaluate their procedures involving the evaluation of long term investment opportunities.ÿ You have agreed to provide a detailed report illustrating the use of several techniques for evaluating capital projects including the weighted average cost of capital to the firm, the anticipated cash flows for the projects, and the methods used for project selection.ÿ In addition, you have been asked to evaluate two projects, incorporating risk into the calculations.You have also agreed to provide an 8-10 page report, in good form, with detailed explanation of your methodology, findings, and recommendations.Company InformationWheel Industries is considering a three-year expansion project, Project A.ÿ The project requires an initial investment of $1.5 million. The project will use the straight-line depreciation method. The project has no salvage value. It is estimated that the project will generate additional revenues of $1.2 million per year before tax and has additional annual costs of $600,000.ÿ The Marginal Tax rate is 35%.Required:Wheel has just paid a dividend of $2.50 per share. The dividends are expected to grow at a constant rate of six percent per year forever. If the stock is currently selling for $50 per share with a 10% flotation cost, what is the cost of new equity for the firm? What are the advantages and disadvantages of using this type of financing for the firm?The firm is considering using debt in its capital structure. If the market rate of 5% is appropriate for debt of this kind, what is the after tax cost of debt for the company? What are the advantages and disadvantages of using this type of financing for the firm?The firm has decided on a capital structure consisting of 30% debt and 70% new common stock. Calculate the WACC and explain how it is used in the capital budgeting process.Calculate the after tax cash flows for the project for each year. Explain the methods used in your calculations.If the discount rate were 6 percent calculate the NPV of the project. Is this an economically acceptable project to undertake? Why or why not?Now calculate the IRR for the project. Is this an acceptable project? Why or why not? Is there a conflict between your answer to part C? Explain why or why not?Wheel has two other possible investment opportunities, which are mutually exclusive, and independent of Investment A above.ÿ Both investments will cost $120,000 and have a life of 6 years. The after tax cash flows are expected to be the same over the six year life for both projects, and the probabilities for each year’s after tax cash flow is given in the table below.Investment BInvestment CProbabilityAfter TaxÿCash FlowProbabilityAfter TaxÿCash Flow0.25$20,0000.30$22,0000.50ÿ 32,0000.50ÿ 40,0000.25ÿ 40,0000.20ÿ 50,000What is the expected value of each project?s annual after tax cash flow? Justify your answers and identify any conflicts between the IRR and the NPV and explain why these conflicts may occur.Assuming that the appropriate discount rate for projects of this risk level is 8%, what is the risk-adjusted NPV for each project? Which project, if either, should be selected? Justify your conclusions.Turn in your completed work to theÿM5: Assignment 1 DropboxÿbyÿMonday, March 6, 2017.Assignment 1 Grading CriteriaMaximum PointsCorrectly calculated the cost of new equity and explained the calculations, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of using this type of financing for the firm. (CO4)20Correctly calculated the cost of new debt and explained the calculations, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of using this type of financing for the firm. (CO4)20Correctly calculated the weighted average cost of capital and explained how and why it is used in the capital budgeting process. (CO4)20Correctly calculated the annual cash flows for the projects and explained the methods used in the calculations. (CO1)44Evaluated the projects using the NPV method and came to the correct conclusions based on the decision rules for the NPV. (CO2)44Evaluated the projects using the IRR method and came to the correct conclusion based on the decision rules for the IRR. Identified any conflicts between the IRR and the NPV and explained why these conflicts may occur. (CO 3)44Correctly introduced risk into the evaluation by using the expected values as the cash flows and evaluated these cash flows using risk adjusted discounted rates. (CO 5)44Written in a clear, concise, and organized manner; demonstrated ethical scholarship in accurate representation and attribution of sources; displayed accurate spelling, grammar, and punctuation.64Total:Religious Studies homework help

TORSION test

TORSION test.

TORSION TEST experiment for meterial science I did work with u befor so i think u know its technical writing just do me the result section persent them in a table This is a guideline for the result section Results – Data is presented as either tables or figures (photos, graphs, drawings, etc.), as appropriate, in this section. Number each table (use Roman numbers) or figure (use Arabic numbers) sequentially, and summarize information about the sample number, type of measurement, and measurement value (with correct units). See section A.8. Illustrations, Tables and Graphs for important additional details on the presentation of tables and figures. If the results are presented in a separate section from the discussion, then this section would be simply a presentation of the data or results, without any interpretation of it. Unless otherwise instructed you should present your results together and integrated with a discussion as described below. ALL of your Tables and Figures should be specifically referred to by number in the text of your discussion. You should not have any Tables or Figures that are not mentioned in the text. An example of an appropriate table of results is presented below:
TORSION test

Legal Aspects Of Child Labour In India

python assignment help Legal Aspects Of Child Labour In India. CHILD LABOUR AND INDIA- AN ANALYSIS OF VARIOUS CONSTITUTIONAL AND STATUTORY PROVISIONS INTRODUCTION Child labour has been in India from a long time in some form or the other. Practice of child labour in match box industries, glass bangle industries and is very commonly seen in cheap restaurants and dhabas etc. Generally speaking child labour can be said to be the exploitation or abuse of children in factories, industries etc, who are below the age specified by law working (mentally or physically) to earn for his/her own survival or to support his/her family partially or fully, and which prevents his/her social and education development may be said to be “child labour”. The reasons which are generally responsible for child labour may include [1] : Poverty, Ignorance, Illiteracy, Population explosion, Lack of knowledge of their own rights, Big amounts of debt on the parents, Large size of family but not enough income to support such big family, Lack of social security scheme in the country, Weak enforcement of labour laws. According to an U.N.O report India has the maximum child labour in the world i.e. approx 20 per cent. [2] On the basis of Census 1991 and various governmental and non-governmental organizations following are the number of child labourers in India [3] : Census 1991 – 2.63 crore, Organization research group, Baroda, 1994-95 – 4.44 crore, Centre for concern of Child Labour – 10 crore. Extra-governmental volunteer organization – more than 5 crore. The numbers may vary according to different organizations but the fact is clear that the numbers of child labourers in India are in crores, which is again a pathetic sight, especially with all the various child labour legislation and the Constitutional provisions. In a report by the Labour Ministry every 4th child is a child labour, aged between 5-14 years and there is one child labour in every three families. [4] But it’s not as if Indian governments haven’t done anything about this grave social stigma, over the years it has enacted many statutory legislations and Constitutional provisions in order to eradicate the problem of child labour, to name some of them, we have: Labour legislations: The Child Labour Act, 1986, The Factories Act, 1948, The Mines Act, 1952, The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009, The Minimum Wages Act, 1948, The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection) of Children Act, 2000 Constitutional provisions [5] : Article 24 provides: strictly prohibits children to work in hazardous environment. Article 21, 45 gives the right to education to all the children below the age of 14years. Article 39 declares the duty of the State to provide the children a free facilities to develop in conditions of freedom and dignity in a healthy manner. India is also a party to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of the Child, 1959. India is also a signatory to: ILO Forced Labour Convention (No. 29); ILO Abolition of Forced Labour Convention (No. 105); UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). World Declaration on the Survival, Protection and Development of Children. The Government of India adopted the National Policy for Children (NPC) in August 1974. This Policy provided that [6] “It shall be the policy of the state to provide adequate service to children both before and after birth and through the period of their growth, to ensure their full physical, mental and social development. The State shall progressively increase the scope of such services so that, within a reasonable time, all children in the country enjoy optimum conditions for their balanced growth.” Indian is also a party to United Nations Declaration on the Rights of the Child, 1959 and Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1992 and has formulated its labour laws in accordance to International Labour Conference resolution of 1979. The first part of the paper aims to look into the various legislations relating to child labour. In the second part we shall look into the various precedents set by the Supreme Court of India on the issue of child labour and finally the conclusion. Chapter 1 CONSTITUTIONLA AND STATUTORY PROVISIONS Constitutional provisions The government of India has enacted various labour laws has in accordance to International Labour Conference resolution of 1979. The Constitution of India, through various articles enshrined in the Fundamental Rights and the Directive Principles of State Policy, lays down that: Article 21 (A) The State shall provide free and compulsory education to all children of the age six to 14 years; Article 24 No child below the age of fourteen years shall be employed to work in any factory or mine or engaged in any other hazardous employment. The word hazardous employment in Art 24 also includes construction industry, also in P.N. v. U.O.I [7] , it has been laid down that Art 24 is enforceable even in the absence of implementing legislations; [8] Article 39(e) States that the health and strength of workers, men and women, and the tender age of children are not abused and that citizens are not forced by economic necessity to enter avocations unsuited to their age or strength; Article 39(f) States that childhood and youth are protected against exploitation and against moral and material abandonment [9] . Hence Art 39 in whole requires the state to ensure and protect the children and provide proper child care. Article 45 The State shall endeavour to provide, within a period of ten years from the commencement of this Constitution, for free and compulsory education for all children until they complete the age of fourteen years The framers of the Constitution imposed a duty on the State under Article 45 as one of the directive principles of the State Policy to provide free and compulsory education to all children until they complete the age of 14 year with the sole objective of completely eradicating illiteracy and child labour. Also many of the states had passed various Acts providing for free and compulsory primary or elementary education to children. But unfortunately years after the commencement of the Constitution the goal set by this Article which was to be achieved in 10 years, have yet not been reached. But the provision in article 39(f) and 45 of the constitution gave certain directions in providing a better quality of life of children employed in the factories. Labour legislations The Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986: The Act prohibits the employment of children below the age of 14 years in 13 occupations and 51 processes that are hazardous to the children’s lives and health listed in the Schedule to the Act [10] . The Factories Act, 1948: The Act completely prohibits children working below the age of 14 years [11] . It further states that if a child is between 15 and 18 years of age, can be employed in a factory only if he has a certificate of fitness granted with reference to him under section 69 which is in the custody of the manager of the factory. The Act also says that no child shall be employed or permitted to work, in any factory for more than four and a half hours in any day; The Mines Act, 1952: The Act prohibits the employment of children in mines, who have not completed their 15th year. The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection) of Children Act, 2000: This Act was last amended in 2002 in conformity with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child covers young persons below 18 years of age. Section 26 of this Act deals with the Exploitation of a Juvenile or Child Employee, and provides in relevant part, that whoever procures a juvenile or the child for the purpose of any hazardous employment and keeps him in bondage and withholds his earnings or uses such earning for his own purposes shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to three years and shall also be liable for fine. The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009: The Act states that all children aged 6 to 14 years shall be provided free and compulsory education. It further states that all private schools should allocated 25 per cent of their seats for disadvantaged and differently abled children. Chapters 2 Precedents set by Supreme Court Though the government of India has enacted various labour legislations to prevent child labour still there are some contradiction among them, mainly the definitional debates on child labour as different legislation provide different definition of a ‘child’. Section 2(ii) of The Child Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986, defines ‘child’ as ” a person who has not completed his fourteenth year of age”; Section 2(c) of The Factories Act, 1948 defines ‘child’ as “a person who has not completed his fifteenth year of age”; Section 2(e) of The Mines Act, 1952 defines ‘child’ as “a person who has not completed his fifteenth year”; Section 2(c) of The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act, 2009, defines ‘child’ as” male or female child of the age of six to fourteen years”; Section 2(k) of The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection) of Children Act, 2000 defines ‘child’ as “a person who has not completed eighteenth year of age”; Section 2(c) of The Plantations Labour Act, 1951 defines ‘child’ as “a person who has not completed his fourteenth year of age” Hence, we can clearly observe that these legislation are at contradiction to each other in defining who’s a child and setting an uniform age limit. Therefore the centre and respective state governments should set a uniform universal minimum age of the child as these contradictions adversely affect the objective of protection from child labour and providing a better educational and social development to children of India. Following are few of important Supreme Court cases that have helped in framing better laws regarding child labour: In Democratic Rights V. Union of India [12] , it was contended that the Employment of Children Act, 1938 was not applicable in the matter of employment of children in construction works, as it was not mentioned in the act. But the court held even construction work is a hazardous employment and no child below the age of 14 years can be employed as given under Art 24 of the Indian Constitution, even though construction industry has not been specified in the schedule to the Employment of children Act, 1938, thus the SC rejected the contention. In Salal Hydro Project vs. Jammu and Kashmir [13] , the Court has restated the principle laid in Democratic Rights V. Union of India [14] that Construction work is hazardous employment and any child below 14 cannot be employed in this work. In Sheela Barse and others vs Union of India and others [15] , Bhagawati, C.J. quoted from National Policy for the welfare of Children incorporated to provide better social and educational development to the children of India : “The Nation’s children a supremely important asset. Their nurture and solicitude are our responsibility. Children’s programme should find a prominent part in our national plans for the development of human resources, so that our children grow up to become robust citizens, physically fit, mentally alert and morally healthy, endowed with the skill and motivations needed by society. Equal opportunities for development to all children during the period of growth should be our aim, for this would serve our large purpose of reducing inequality and ensuring social justice”. In M.C. Mehta v State of Tamil NaduLegal Aspects Of Child Labour In India

MHA5016 Capella University Health Information Improvement Proposal Paper

MHA5016 Capella University Health Information Improvement Proposal Paper.

Develop an 8–10-page proposal in which you pull together your prior recommendations and stakeholder analysis to create a compelling proposal for implementation of contemporary data analysis tools, and practices to improve organizational and patient outcomes.The complexity of health information management (HIM) technology requires a sound strategy throughout the implementation phase and well into the end user experience. Continual and ongoing evaluation of the systems is very important to ensure compliance with regulations and appropriate use of electronic health records and other components. Health care managers must understand who their target audience is when developing a strategic plan related to HIM systems. They also need to have a strong understanding of the data that is collected through the systems and how that data impacts decision-making. In this assessment, you will have the opportunity to develop a strategic proposal analyzing the priorities of a typical health care organization. You will also be tasked with understanding how data drives decision-making processes and how health care organizations set strategic goals.By successfully completing this assessment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assessment criteria:Competency 1: Apply emerging models or best practices to implement a health information system that improves operations and patient outcomes. (L8.4, L12.2, L14.3)Analyze how contemporary data analysis trends could be leveraged to improve current practices in an organization.Recommend best practices for collecting data, securely storing data and converting data analytics into useful and understandable deliverables.Competency 2: Analyze administrative, clinical, management, and decision-support information technology tools. (L12.1, 12.2, 14.3)Explain recommendations related to technological and logistical changes to an organization’s health information management system.Explain how data products and outcomes from recommendations align with an organization’s administrative and clinical goals.Competency 4: Apply evidence to influence buy-in from all stakeholders. (L10.5)Apply relevant evidence and best practices to target proposal messaging to stakeholders.Competency 5: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with expectations for professionals in health care administration. (L6.1, L6.2, L6.3, and L6.4)Communicate proposal in a professional, clear, and concise way.Integrate relevant sources to support assertions, correctly formatting citations and references using current APA style**. Also please follow APA format and DO NOT PLAGIARIZE.Please complete this after you completeStakeholder Communication in Health Information Systems
MHA5016 Capella University Health Information Improvement Proposal Paper

HOST 2084 Ryerson University Hotel Management International Capstone Paper

HOST 2084 Ryerson University Hotel Management International Capstone Paper.

Hello, this is a reflection report on Capston.Capstone is a virtual hotel operation system. We act as the owner of the hotel, and we need one person to be responsible for the setting of all departments of the whole hotel. For example, we need to adjust the price of each quarter, discount, employee, employee salary, catering price, decoration, advertisement and so on…I have put an example in the attachment. You can read the example first before you know how to answer the question. DO NOT USE ANY REFERENCE, ONLY USE YOUR OWN WORDS
HOST 2084 Ryerson University Hotel Management International Capstone Paper