Get help from the best in academic writing.

RCC Social Justice Issues Racism & Remember the Titans Textual Analysis Essay

RCC Social Justice Issues Racism & Remember the Titans Textual Analysis Essay.

term paper 5-7 pages that is a critical/thoughtful analysis (“Textual Analysis”) of something in the media that you believe has a strong effect on racism, gender issues, or class. Look for a great song, movie, television program, book, or contemporary poem that you would enjoy analyzing. Key Elements of a Textual AnalysisA summary of the text. Your readers may not know the text you are analyzing, so you need to include it or tell them about it before you can analyze it. …Attention to the context. …A clear interpretation or judgment. …What can be inferred from their narrative regarding race, or gender?Was it positive or negative? Did it work?Reasonable support for your conclusions
RCC Social Justice Issues Racism & Remember the Titans Textual Analysis Essay

MATH 261 Northern Virginia Community College Calculus And Its Applications Questions.

These are selected questions that I need assistance with. Here are the select questions that have been givenComplete 3.3: 1 – 11 (odd), 15 – 25 (odd), 29, 31, 35, 37, 43Complete 3.4: 3, 5, 7 – 17 (odd), 21, 29, 33, 35, 37, 45, 55, 58Complete 3.5: 1, 5, 15, 17 a)Questions are from textbook: Calculus And Its Applications, Second Edition,by Bittinger, Ellenbogen, and Surgent (ISBN: 00135931045 or 9780135931042).The questions have to be answered with at least some work shown on a separate paper in which can be put into a single pdf to be submitted
MATH 261 Northern Virginia Community College Calculus And Its Applications Questions

Response to classmates’s posts ( Black Board ) Joints Six Commision Critical Aspect!. Can you help me understand this Health & Medical question?

HealthCare Emergency Management!

-Please response to at least three of classmates’ posts by ( Agreeing, disagreeing, expanding a point, challenging, show an interest from personal experience, etc. ) but remember to be friendly and natural as if you were in a classroom having an actual discussion with collogue.
-APA Styke is needed.
-Peer reviewed articles in last 10 years.
Preferring choosing from the reading.

The Original Question
Week 3 Discussion Board

Pick 2 of the six Joint Commission’s six critical aspects of emergency response. Describe them and provide supporting documentation on why they are defined as critical by the Joint Commission.

The Readings!!!

Week 3 – Readings
Reilly, M., &Markenson, D. S. (2010). Health Care Emergency Management: Principles and Practice

Chapter 4: Legal Issues and Regulatory Compliance

Health Care at the Crossroads: Strategies for Creating and Sustaining Community-Wide Emergency Preparedness Systems:
http://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/emergency_preparedness.pdf

Response to classmates’s posts ( Black Board ) Joints Six Commision Critical Aspect!

Characteristics of dyslexia and its effect on children

Characteristics of dyslexia and its effect on children. Dyslexia, which is also known as specific reading disability, is a complicated condition. Issues surrounding dyslexia such as how and why it occurs and how it can be assessed and treated are constantly being discussed. This condition has various characteristics but not all of them affect every person who has dyslexia. Thus, it has been impossible to agree on a conclusive definition of dyslexia. However, it can be said that phonological defect is strongly related to the condition of dyslexia. In this essay the controversial points over the main causes of dyslexia will be outlined and discussed. The second part of the essay will discuss the discrepancy tests which are used to diagnose dyslexia and their reliability will be measured. The third part of the essay will relate the causes to intervention. This will be followed by an explanation of Fast ForWord, (a method of intervention) and a discussion of how effective this is for children with dyslexia and some criticism for this kind of intervention method. The term dyslexia Dyslexia has previously been diagnosed as blindness and it was thought to be a medical problem (Lawrence, 2009). Dyslexia is currently defined as a learning difficulty, or more specifically reading difficulties. According to Hornsby (1984), the word dyslexia comes from the Greek and it means problems with language, especially reading. From my experience it may seem for some people the effects of dyslexia will not cross the school barriers, but indeed it goes further than that with the dyslexic person. For example, it takes a child with dyslexia much longer to work out the meaning of verbal instructions, therefore they respond more slowly. This is also the case for everyday life, not just at school (Lawrence, 2009). Such this problem with the child could affect his communication with his beer group, because he may not act as fast as non-dyslexic children and as a result that has a negative impact on his personality as well as his social life. I witnessed one example of dyslexia in a child in Saudi Arabia. This child isolated himself in his room most of the time and he never wanted to take part in any activities with his brothers (2 older and 1 younger) because they always tried to irritate him in many ways such as, coping his way in reading and shouting at him when he doesn’t respond to them normally. As a result of this, in addition to his parents ignoring the problem due to their lack of knowledge about it, over time he developed very low self-esteem and he ended up in isolation. There are obvious characteristics and signs of dyslexia in a child such as finding it difficult to learn the alphabet, being unable to recall patterns and the order of events, difficulties with reading, writing and spelling, issues with short-term memory, problems with recalling verbal instructions, confusing left and right and reversing the order of words in a sentence (Lawrence, 2009). Yet, there are several reasons that make it difficult to notice dyslexia in a child. The first reason is that there is no guarantee that dyslexic characteristics will be obvious, as some children are very good at concealing their difficulties. The second reason is that indicators of dyslexia sometimes are very similar to those of other learning difficulties. Such as the learning difficulties which would result from the background of the family. (Lawrence, 2009). For example, my daughter is 2 years old and although it is too soon to confirm any potential learning difficulty, I have been told by her nursery that she is less capable than other children of the same age in verbal activities such as naming a substantial material for the child (bottle) or a pets (dogs and cats) in English. The reason for this is because we sometimes speak to her in Arabic and we sometimes talk to her in English. Therefore, we can’t be 100 per cent sure that she has a learning difficulty. Therefore, I firmly agree with Mr Lawrence that it is not easy to identify and assess the cause of dyslexia on the child. This leads us onto the question of what dyslexia is. What is dyslexia? As dyslexia covers such a large area it is not viable to have a single definition. This is for several reasons including the large variety of symptoms which manifest themselves in a person with dyslexia and the large number of stockholders in dyslexia (Lawrence, 2009). Therefore, it is evident that there are varying definitions of dyslexia that are in use. One definition is that it is a neurological condition with the existence of other problem such as visual and the auditory system deficit (Siegel and Smythe2004). Another suggestion is that it is caused by inefficiency in the process of the language in the brain and it is all has a genetic origin (Dyslexia action, 2007). An additional classification is that dyslexia is an amalgamation of abilities and difficulties that has impact in the learning process (The British Dyslexia Association, 2001). The following part of this assignment will expand on these definitions which related to the cause of dyslexia. Is dyslexia genetic? According to research it is possible that dyslexia could be genetic. This idea is supported by a study that was carried out on a large Norwegian family. The study showed that current members of the family had had problems with reading and spelling at school. This issue had also affected the two previous generations. Thus, researchers are of the opinion that dyslexia is genetic. Furthermore, a gene for dyslexia was found in chromosome 2 (Fagerheim, Paeymaekers, Tonnessen, Pedersen, Tranebjaerg and 1999). However, in my opinion it is still essential to take the family’s background and culture into consideration as these factors could contribute to the outcome of the studies. The significance of a family’s background is demonstrated in the following example. Where was the father occupation is the base, which resulted, despite the interpretation of the writer, the numbers of specific reading retardation children for unskilled parents were higher than those who have professional parents (Jorm, 1983). Moreover, if the parents find reading to be a difficult activity it is likely that this will be the same for their children. It is also imperative to consider children who have dyslexia but where there is no genetic evidence of this disability in their family history (Jorm, 1983). For the purpose of emphasis the genetic cause of dyslexia many twins studies were carried out and almost accounted for the genetic factor of the cause of dyslexia (Hulme and Snowling, 2009). However, Hulme and Snowling criticise the method which used in twins studies and claimed that these methods usually used to separate categories that are more typical of physical characteristics and they are not valid for children with reading problems (Hulum, et al., 2009). Interestingly, some researchers have compared a test results for twins with reading difficulties and found out that although there are a similarities also a big differences was found between the twins’ scores in the test (Hulme, et al., 2009). However, there are other theories about the cause of dyslexia, including the Mangnocellular Hypotheses which will be examined in the following part of this assignment. Is dyslexia caused by a vision deficit? (Magnocellular Hypotheses) A vision deficit was suggested to be one of the causes of dyslexia. Stein and Walsh (1997) claimed that a sensory defect in the large nerve cells (magnocells) in the eye could be a reason of dyslexia. The role of these cells is to deliver information for quick movement and if the image in these cells becomes unstable, the organization of processing print or symbols will be affected. However, it is important to question whether this is really a cause of reading difficulties because even a normal child could experience the same visual issue when he or she starts reading, for example swapping round the letters “b” and “d”. Moreover, adults when in an embarrassing situation such as a presentation could change an entire word. For example, I once read strategies as stages in a presentation. Therefore, it is normal for a child with reading difficulties to make what appear to be visual mistakes when reading. The argument about the cause of dyslexia will continue to the next topic of the discussion which would be the auditory deficit theory. Is the auditory deficit theory the cause of the problem in dyslexia? It has been said that dyslexia could also be caused by auditory problems because people with dyslexia often mix up the sequence of syllables and numbers when they hear them out loud. This is because of the manner in which the brain translates the nerve impulse sent by the ears. With normal people, the right ear is usually responsible for interpreting speech sounds because it is connected to the left hemisphere (which specialises in language). However, often this is not the case with dyslexic person which could be the cause of the problem in dyslexia (Nicolson and Fawcett, 2008). According to Thomson and Watkins (1990), people with dyslexia tend to have issues with sequencing skills, especially when they have to determine sounds. Therefore, when taking the research that has been conducted on this area into account it appears that auditory perceptions could be one of the causes of dyslexia. Tallal and Piercy (1973) have conducted man experiments which is the result supports the auditory deficit theory and refer the reading deficit to an origin of auditory perception deficit. They claimed that the auditory deficit will lead to speech perception and then to phonological deficit which in the end would result a reading deficit. This suggestion will be compared to an opposing theory in a later section of this assignment. The dominant theory of dyslexia The phonological deficit was found as a main problem in dyslexia in a wide variety of studies. Many researchers in this field have conducted a lot of studies with the aim of uncovering the primary cause of the disability. The result of these studies was that dyslexia is caused by a cognitive deficit that is particular linked to the process of speech sound (Bryant and Bradley,1985). This theory is called the phonological theory of dyslexia. Words are consist of units of sound which can be connected together to generate words. According to Bryant and Bradley (1985), in order to be aware of words you first have to divide the speech stream information. Conversely, normal readers have the ability to get the information they into words, then segment the words into phonemes. Experts have discovered that children with dyslexia find it difficult to retain phonological need from their memory without having to think about it consciously (Bryant, et a.l, 1985). Nicolson and Fawcett (2008) believe that children with this disability have problems with accessing the information that is stored in their memory. Therefore, it is evident that children with dyslexia will find it difficult to read new words. Thus, this issue will not affect normal readers, as they will be able to consult their memory to access the necessary phonological information (Snowling, 1995). Although there are other conditions such as reading impairments or an auditory deficit that match this theory, they are not really relevant to children with dyslexia. There are several different indicators of phonological deficits that are present in children with dyslexia before the reading age. Examples include pronunciation difficulties between the ages of 2 and 5 and problems with naming objects at the age of 3 (Scarborough and Dorbrich, 1990). Potential dyslexia can be determined from listening to a child speak. Sometimes it is possible to hear that a child’s phonological skills are not developing as they should be. That due to the complexity of everyday language which has an impact on a child’s ability to learn the names and sounds of the letters in the alphabet and their capability to pronounce specific words (Shaywitz, 2003). Phonological Deficit and the Auditory Deficit A comparative study was carried out on normally developing children and children with learning difficulties to determine whether there was a link between phonological deficits and auditory deficits. The study required both groups of children to complete an auditory repetition task. The outcome was that the group of children with learning difficulties found it more difficult to complete the task than the group of normally developing children (Talla, et al., 1973). However, after considering the results of the study, it was concluded that an auditory deficit could not be the cause for the phonological deficit found in children with dyslexia (Hulme, et al., 2009). This conclusion came about because the group of children with learning difficulties also had oral language difficulties. Therefore, this indicates that the auditory deficit is associated and linked strongly with language difficulties and not particularly to reading difficulties (Hulme, et al., 2009). The Hemisphere Theories Another related fact in defining the problem in dyslexia is the function of the hemisphere. The brains of both people with dyslexia and normal readers appear to be different from each other. REsearch harR Research has shown that there is a relationship between the way a brain is organised and dyslexia. The brain consists of two hemispheres, each of them has different roles, the left hemisphere is linked to the verbal tasks whereas, the right hemisphere is linked to other tasks. It is common knowledge that children use the left side of their brain to acquire information (Galaburda, 1989). A comparative study on adults with dyslexia and adults without this condition discovered that the right hemisphere of the brain is larger in individuals with dyslexia; however the left hemispere is larger in people without dyslexia (Galaburda, 1989). This could be the interpretation to the problem in dyslexia. In relation to the results of this study, Miles (1974) carried out an experiment which showed that in the brains of people with dyslexia language was spread more equally over the two halves of the brain. Therefore, there is an increased number of messages which are transferred from one side of the brain to the other, which can cause a mass in the nerve signals while connecting the two language areas in the brain. Furthermore, it was proved that the responsibility for the coordination and physical activities for example, movement and balance is linked to the cerebellum in the brain. Fawcett and Nicolson (1994) have demonstrated that there is a significant link between phonological issues and motor skills. Even though a link has been established between the cerebellum and dyslexia, the establishment could not conclusively determine whether this is the principal cause of dyslexia (Lawrence, 2009). It must be noted that research into the brain differences of people with dyslexia and normal readers is still relatively new. Thus, even though some studies have produced similar results, it cannot definitively consider the main cause of dyslexia. Moreover, it should be considered that people with dyslexia would have a less experience in reading then non-dyslexic, therefore, this would be interpretation for the different structure and function of the area in brain which involved in reading. An important consideration is that the different in the brain construction and function in people with dyslexia could be the consequences for their lake of reading experience and not the cause of the deficit (Hulme, et al., 2009). Yet, it seems that the facts overlap. Some of them could be the cause and a consequence at the same time. This is further explained in diagrams 1, 2 and 3. Phonological deficit, learning problem and other symptoms such as responding to verbal orders and the size and deficit in left hemisphere in the brain. A diagnosis of dyslexia Auditory deficit leads to Is it? Diagram 1 Or? Auditory deficit and the same consequences as in diagram 1. A diagnosis of dyslexia Genetic Factor leads to Diagram 2 The same consequences as in diagram 1 can be misinterpret-ed as a visual or auditory deficit. Cognitive deficit “triangle model”. Hulme et al., (2009) p. 63. Leads to A diagnosis of dyslexia Diagram 3 The visual theory poses the same symptoms on children with dyslexia, as well as, including the characteristics in the diagrams above. The diagrams interpretations are not the only possible starting point for dyslexia, but they illustrate some of the possibility. After the discussion for the cause of the problem, the second part of the assignment will move to the assessment and diagnosis for it. Assessment and diagnosis of dyslexia In order to correctly identify a student’s requirements an educational diagnosis is essential. It is obvious that assessment and diagnosis have several advantages. The advantages of testing for dyslexia include making it possible for the stockholders to discover whether a child is dyslexic, determining a child’s strengths and weaknesses if they are dyslexic, finding out what symptoms they have and allowing the teacher to provide adequate support in the future (Klein, 1993). Simply put, carrying out a test would allow teachers to assess a child’s abilities. The next step would be to analyse the results of the test and to put the child in the most appropriate class and to provide a sufficient level of learning support. It is imperative that this is done carefully and for this reason several studies have been carried out to ensure the tests are accurate. There are several tests that are used to determine whether a child has dyslexia or not, however the one which is most frequently used is the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) (Cotton, Crewther, Crewther 2005). However, it is really face a real criticism for its method in measuring the intelligence then makes a decision in replacing a child or labelling him. To illustrate, WISC uses two scales, the first one is verbal and the second one is performance which a general IQ would be taken out of them and a child who fell into under 1or 2 mince Standard Deviation will be labelled as a dyslexic and provide him with the support he needs (Thomson, 1990). However, it is quite difficult to judge the results of this test because children with dyslexia have problems with specific tasks that are found in intelligence tests, therefore this would have an unfair impact on their IQ. Consequently, it is very important to consider a child’s IQ carefully as this form of assessment is based on a general estimate of a child’s abilities and it just reflects the bottom line for this ability (Thomson, 1990). This is also true of the British Ability Scales. The BAS has a supplementary feature which calculates a child’s ability by taking various processes into account. These processes include some activities such as, reasoning or short-term memory. It is common for a child with dyslexia to have difficulties with short-term memory tests which might be a reason to believe this child only has limited abilities (Thomson, 1990). However, the results of this test are poor because each individual person’s abilities are subject to many factors such as the senses (visual and hearing), reasoning, cognition, and memory. When a dyslexic child has a deficit in one area, it is common for him/her to be less able in this area when compared to a non-dyslexic child. Aaron in 1994 also holds the same opinion and has conducted research about the use of intelligence tests to determine reading ability. In general it can be said that intelligence tests are used to differentiate between children who do and do not have dyslexia by looking at their reading attainment. However, these tests are inconclusive because the real reading ability for the student it cannot be ascertained by the differences between the reading potential for the child and his attainment in reading. Moreover, even though a number of studies have reported that there is a relationship between reading achievement and IQ results, IQ accounts for few percentages of the variation found in the students reading attainment. In reality the majority of research studies have demonstrated that the relationship between IQ and reading achievement is negligible (Aaron, 1994). However, it is true that there is a relationship between IQ and how accurately a child can read but this cannot be applied some children who find it difficult to learn how to read at school. In addition to the relation between IQ and reading problem Hulme and Snowling conclude that, “From an educational perspective there is no evidence that children who have word level (decoding) reading problems will vary in their responsiveness to teaching according to their IQ level” (Hulme, et al., 2009).p39 Several researchers were sceptical about the accuracy of intelligence tests so conducted a study on a group of teenagers and young adults with dyslexia. The participants were initially tested then retested after six years later. Surprisingly, the outcome indicated a considerable decrease in verbal IQ, however this was on one hand attributed to the unreliable nature of the test. Yet, the level of performance IQ improved significantly. On the other hand, the research illustrated another interoperation as well rather than just the reliability of test, for example for the increase in the PIQ test this could be indication for the improvement in the visual skills or problem solving skills or any other skills for the student. The decrease in the VIQ test could be as a result of the dyslexic children who usually try to keep away from reading experience as well as some other experience such writing. Ultimately, intelligence tests should be used cautiously as the results could be used to make important decisions (Ingesson, 2006) From time to time it is difficult to distinguish poor readers from children with dyslexia. This is where intelligence tests can be useful. To illustrate, if fifty subjects were tested, and half of them were diagnosed with dyslexia, then over a period of time, tested again, the non-dyslexic children will have improved more so than that of the child with dyslexia. It could then be assumed those children that improved were just poor readers for some reason, such as, from their environment, and they don’t have a deficit. This scenario could explain the discrepancies in the results of the studies that were conducted. Even thought there are a lot of disadvantages for using the discrepancy test, there are many institutions around the world such as, the World Health Organisation and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders both agree with using discrepancy models. However, the matter that needs to be considered is how they should be used. Moreover the error associated with the tests and the way it occurs should be recognised as well (Cotton, et al., 2005). In 2005 Cotton, et al. suggested ways to observe the test errors. It was mentioned that in the classic test theory, the observed score should consist of the error and the true score; the true score is assumed as real reflection for the child’s ability, which can be concluded from a test without restrictions. If the difference in the results between both tests observed and true was large that means there are a lot of errors. Furthermore, it is important to bear in mind how beneficial intervention and remediation programmes can be to a child with dyslexia if it is based on a correct result for assessment and the opposite is true. Thus, it should be imperative to reflect on measurement error when analysing discrepancy scores (Cotton, et al., 2005). The accuracy of assessment dyslexia is really crucial for the students as it was mentioned before. Therefore the assessment methods are always examined in order to avoid wrong diagnosis. Indeed a wrong diagnosis could affect the entire family. For instance, the son of one of my relatives was diagnosed with dyslexia 2 years ago when he was 7 years old. He couldn’t speak very clearly and only his parents could understand him properly. Recently, my relative’s second child was diagnosed with dyslexia when he was in the first year of primary school. However, by the end of the first year he had made significant progress, so the special education teacher retested him. The results of the second test were very different from the original diagnosis and he showed a great improvement in all the parts of the tests. Further investigations were made which highlighted the fact that the family had been talking to him in the same way his big brother spoke, for example when the parents told the child to watch Tom and Jerry they would say watch TJ instead of saying do you want to watch Tom and Jerry. Let’s assume the first child was misdiagnosed as dyslexic and with this kind treatment from his parents he would probably get the same result for real dyslexic child in the test. Indeed, his brothers or sisters would also be affected by these circumstances. In this case I have really doubt about the first child diagnosis and the reason for him to not make any progress in the tests would be because the lake of the motivation to learn and he may want to stay always under his parents spoiled treatment and hating attending to school. The intervention Due to the numerous possible causes of dyslexia an equal number of interventions have been suggested. In the first part of this assignment it was inferred that a child with dyslexia might have an abnormal brain structure which could mean the child would interpret sounds incorrectly. The results of a study on developmental dyslexia that used brain-imaging techniques support this theory. The outcome of the study indicated that children with developmental dyslexia find reading difficult because their brains cannot process the change in the sounds accurately. Another discovery that was made was that by utilising computerised sound training, the children with developmental dyslexia were able to tackle the problem in the brain. This training made it easier for the children with dyslexia to process sounds effectively, thus they would experience improvement in their problem to read (Gaab, Gabrieli, Deutsch, Tallal , Temple, 2007). Another difficulty that children with developmental dyslexia faced was making a connection between letters and their sounds. A child who does not have dyslexia can normally process sounds quickly, but if a child is dyslexic they can find it difficult to determine individual speech sounds speedily and thus they will mix up syllables and create an incorrect internal sound map. Hence, it is expected for them to have problems with phonetic skills. As previously mentioned, computerised training can be used to re-wire the networks in the brain. This intervention results in the strengthening of brain areas which were previously relatively weak. Thus, the symptoms of developmental dyslexia become less noticeable over time (Gaab et al., 2007). This would appear to be an effective method of intervention and has resulted in the production of numerous programmes to lessen the phonological deficit in children with dyslexia. An example which has produced positive results in children with dyslexia is a computer programme called Fast ForWord. Fast ForWord was created by Tallal and several of her colleagues (Tallal, Mezenich, MillerCharacteristics of dyslexia and its effect on children

Ordinary Men by Christopher R. Browning Critical Essay

essay writing service free Ordinary Men by Christopher R. Browning Critical Essay. Throughout history, several injustices have been committed by various people and groups. History scholars often evaluate the perpetrators of such injustices. Perpetrators are often thought to be brutal sadists without any conscience or morals but they are never thought to be ordinary human beings. The reasons why most people often avoid looking at perpetrators from this angle is because they fear that they might recognize some similarities between the perpetrators and themselves. “Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland” is a book that tells the story about ordinary people who become fierce genocide perpetrators. The author of this book is Christopher Browning a renowned holocaust scholar. The author’s main argument in this book is that everyone obeys the government and authority figures and people always comply with these rules to avoid being alienated. The author of this book traces the activities of a German police squad named ‘Reserve Police Battalion (RPB) 101’. The RPB 101 is a police unit that has members who are recruited from ordinary citizens. The unit goes from being an amateur police unit to being a formidable killer force. Holocaust scholars are always divided in terms of their opinions about what triggered and sustained the holocaust1. Browning’s opinions are always considered to be ‘moderately functionalist’. According to him, the order to eliminate the Jewish people came after a big number of Jewish people had already been eliminated. The author’s expertise on the subject has seen him contribute to the Holocaust museum and act as an expert witness in Nazi trials2. Browning’s other works have dealt with Holocaust recollections and war trials. Nevertheless, “Ordinary Men” is one of the author’s most significant works. The book also serves as a source of micro-history for Holocaust scholars. “Ordinary Men” starts by giving statistics about the extent of the Holocaust by 1942. According to the author, in March of 1942 over seventy-five per cent of all holocaust victims were still alive. However, a year later over seventy-five percent of the Holocaust victims were dead3. The author points out that between March 1942 and February 1943, there were a lot of mass murders that were going on. In addition, the author pinpoints Poland as the epicenter of the Holocaust. This means that there had to be several German operatives on the ground during the height of the Holocaust. However, the author points out that during this time the German army was pre-occupied in the battle of Stalingrad. This means that the German administration had to source manpower from elsewhere. The author set out to Germany to investigate the suspicious circumstances surrounding the success of the Holocaust. When perusing through records in the State Administration for Justice’s office, Browning came across the RPB 101’s records. The author then acknowledges the people who helped him in the course of his research. The book’s first chapter starts with the leader of the RPB 101 briefing his soldiers. Major Wilhelm Trapp lets his soldiers know about the task that lay ahead. According to Trapp, the soldiers were to “round up Jews in the village of Józefów, separate those who were of working age (who were to be sent to concentration camps) from women, children, and the elderly, and then shoot the rest”4. In a surprising turn of events in this first chapter, Major Trapp offers the soldiers a chance to abstain from the task if they felt like they were not up to it. However, the author does not reveal whether any of the soldiers take this chance at this point but he instead continues with the next chapter. The main reason why the author chose to start the book with a cliffhanger is to capture the reader’s attention. In the next chapter, the author does not continue with the subject matter of the first chapter. Instead, the author begins tracing the RPB’s origin. According to Browning, RPB 101 was part of the Order Police an organization that was created by Nazi. The order police operated like the army police and they had basic military training and equipments. In the subsequent chapters, the author delves into the activities of the Order Police around 1940. The Order Police mostly took part in the slaughter of Jews in the Soviet Union. Browning details how the Holocaust began with public beatings and humiliations. Eventually, the humiliated people would be dragged to the woods where they were shot. The Order Police was also charged with transporting people to concentration camps. The fifth chapter addresses the main activities of the RPB 101. For instance, the RPB’s activities in the 1940 included resettling the Jews who were living in Nazi territory in a bid to achieve “racial purity”5. The book also has a detailed analysis of the members of the RPB 101. According to the author, the members consisted mostly of middle-aged working class men. The author does a good job of giving a historical background of the Order Police and RPB 101. This helps casual readers understand most of the events surrounding the Holocaust. The background information offered by the author also helps supplement his primary sources, which in this case are the RPB 101’s records. Browning informs readers that the men in Battalion 101 were not necessarily hardcore Nazi adherents. The group was consisted of people who had preexisting political and moral standards even before joining Nazi. The author notes that even the Nazi leaders had little faith in the group. The author then revisits the cliffhanger in the first chapter by continuing narrating about the RPB 101’s first experience in Józefów. According to the book, only thirteen men out of a group of around 500 men chose to take Major Trapp’s offer and abstain from the mass killings. The author then continues to explore the circumstances surrounding RPB 101’s massacre. The book ends with the members of the RPB 101 retreating to Germany. The book also offers a few details about the trials that resulted from RPB 101’s atrocities. According to the author, only three members of this battalion were convicted. Moreover, none of their sentences exceeded four years. The author’s protests against the aftermath of the Holocaust are apparent. The author then recaps the process through which ordinary people became killing machines. One of the author’s main influences is Paul Hilberg. This explains why this book has some similarities with Hilberg’s earlier book “Perpetrators, Victims, and Bystanders”. Like Hilberg, Browning addresses the issue of studying perpetrators with the view of empathizing with them6. This approach is not common among historians. Most historians usually study perpetrators with the view of castigating them. Browning opts for simplicity when writing this book. The author does not use any complicated grammar or writing style. Instead, the author uses simple sentences that are devoid of any pretentious synonyms. This style increases the scope of the book’s intended audience. The author’s simple style of writing saw the book being embraced even by the mainstream audience. The book’s first chapter is very short and it shocks the readers to some extent. The events that transpire in the beginning of the book almost seem fictional. The author’s specific details about what happened the first time the RPB 101 arrived in Poland are shocking. However, the readers often doubt the accuracy of these details. For instance, it is hard for the reader to believe that the RPB’s leader spoke “with a choking voice and tears in his eyes”7. The only way to ascertain the accuracy of these details is by accessing the author’s primary sources and this is not easy to accomplish. Nevertheless, it is through these candid details that the author is able to connect the audience with the RPB 101 members in a more humane level. The author’s choice of language is very important to the book’s overall outlook. For example, the author uses language that helps unearth the perpetrator’s inner characters. In one instance, the author claims that the perpetrators “committed several more massacres to mirror their desensitization”8. The author also portrays the men’s ‘fun side’ using casual language in their dialogue including the use of nicknames. This choice is in line with the author’s aim of investigating the perpetrators with a view of emphasizing with them. Another strong point of this book is the author’s sources. The author mostly relies on Nazi reports and diaries as his primary sources. This makes “Ordinary Men” a useful secondary source as far as the history of the Holocaust is concerned. The author’s main sources are the ones concerning RPB 101 and they are the book’s most valued asset. Moreover, the author manages to use visual sources in his book. The visual sources include photographs and maps. However, the author chose to put all his visual sources in one page as opposed to spreading them around the book. The latter would have been more beneficial. The book was well received in both academic and non-academic circles. The book’s new method of exploring perpetrators was very popular with critics. However, shortly after “Ordinary Men” was published another book titled “Hitler’s Willing Executioners” by Daniel Goldhagen sought to discredit Browning’s work. Among Goldhagen’s major protests is that the men in the RPB 101 were ordinary human beings9. On the other hand, Browning accuses Goldhagen of providing ‘populist’ conclusions in his book. Nonetheless, Goldhagen is able to point out some valid inconsistencies in Browning’s book. For instance, Browning misrepresents the dates when the massacres supposedly started. Overall, “Ordinary Men” is an insightful book that deserves recognition for its original historical account on the Holocaust. Browning is able to balance between providing a well-researched historical account and a well-analyzed conclusion concerning the activities of RPB 101. However, the author seems determined to seek empathy for the RPB 101 members and therefore ignores some inconsistencies in his story. Nevertheless, the author is able to persuade the readers to empathize with the members of the 101 battalion. This book could be beneficial to all readers who might be interested in history especially that of the Holocaust. Bibliography Browning, Christopher. Ordinary Men. New York: Harper Perennial, 1993. Goldhagen, Daniel. Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust. New York: Basic Books, 2007. Hilberg, Raul. Perpetrators Victims Bystanders: Jewish Catastrophe 1933-1945. New York: HarperCollins, 2003. Sivan, Edward. War and Remembrance in the 20th century. New York: Cambridge, 1999. Footnotes 1 Edward Sivan, War and Remembrance in the 20th century. (New York: Cambridge, 1999), 45. 2 Christopher Browning, Ordinary men. (New York: Harper Perennial, 1993), xi. 3 Browning, Ordinary men, 13. 4 Christopher Browning, Ordinary men. (New York: Harper Perennial, 1993), 16. 5 Christopher Browning, Ordinary men. (New York: Harper Perennial, 1993), 79. 6 Raul Hilberg, Perpetrators Victims Bystanders: Jewish Catastrophe 1933-1945. (New York: HarperCollins, 2003), 21. 7 Christopher Browning, Ordinary men. (New York: Harper Perennial, 1993), 82. 8 Christopher Browning, Ordinary men. (New York: Harper Perennial, 1993), 172. 9 Daniel Goldhagen, Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust. (New York: Basic Books, 2007), 16. Ordinary Men by Christopher R. Browning Critical Essay

Park University Apple Financial Performance Analysis Paper

Park University Apple Financial Performance Analysis Paper.

I’m working on a business project and need support to help me study.

Course Project InformationFor this unit’s Course Project assignment, students should submit their complete project with components from Units 1 through 6 compiled in the same document. In addition, students should refine each unit’s components with grading feedback.Students are required to select a publicly traded company and prepare a thorough written financial analysis of the company. Students will select a company of their choice to research, evaluate their financial position, understand their future growth opportunities and speak to their overall corporate health.The analysis should be approximately eight pages long including historical financial documents and a comprehensive evaluation of the company’s performance over the last 3 years as well as insights into the company’s future opportunities.Company information and financial data can be found using the company’s annual reports (usually found in the “About Us” section of the company’s home website page), SEC filings, Moody’s Investor Service, Yahoo Finance, and other legitimate financial resources. Refer to Assignments and Grading for grading requirements.Due dateThe course project is due on Sunday of Unit 7 by midnight, CST.RubricUnit 7: Course Project RubricCourse ProjectProject InformationFor this unit’s Course Project assignment, students should submit their complete project with components from Units 1 through 6 compiled in the same document. In addition, students should refine each unit’s components with grading feedback.Students are required to select a publicly traded company and prepare a thorough written financial analysis of the company. Students will select a company of their choice to research, evaluate their financial position, understand their future growth opportunities and speak to their overall corporate health.The analysis should be approximately eight pages long including historical financial documents and a comprehensive evaluation of the company’s performance over the last 3 years as well as insights into the company’s future opportunities.Company information and financial data can be found using the company’s annual reports (usually found in the “About Us” section of the company’s home website page), SEC filings, Moody’s Investor Service, Yahoo Finance, and other legitimate financial resources. Due datesSections of the Course Project are due on the Sunday of the Unit by midnight, CST.Company history and backgroundUnit 2 – Select the company and write up the company introduction/overviewFinancial history and analysisUnit 3 – Locate the needed financial statementsUnit 4 – Financial statement analysisUnit 5 – Key ratio analysisFuture opportunity assessmentUnit 6 – Future growth opportunitiesProofreading CompletionUnits 2 – 7 – Collate sections and make edits based on instructor’s feedback. Submit full paper in Unit 7 with proper formatting.Requirements and FormattingYour final paper must include the followingBrief history of the company
Length: 2 to 3 paragraphsContent: should include the company’s history and reason(s) for being in existence Brief description of the company’s industry and the major competitors in that industryLength: 2 to 3 paragraphsContent: should include the company’s key competitors.Comparison of financial dataLength: 2 to 3 pagesContent: In this section you will use the company’s key financial statements from the last 3 years, including balance sheets, income statements, and cash flow statements, to discuss your observation of the company’s financial activity over that three year period. Note changes in the key line items (Assets, Sales, COGS, Profit, etc) and discuss the key drivers (i.e. new customer or product, new investment, etc) of these changes as well as the implications to the company.Activities such as extraordinary gains or losses, stock or bond issuance, retirement of debt, or any other significant changes or trends over that three year period in a particular area should be noted. Your discussion should include observations from the company’s cash flow statements of the cash flows from operating, investing, and financing activities to determine the company’s primary sources and uses of cash during each of the three years. Graphs or charts may also be used to support your observations. Statements should be submitted with Course Project paperFinancial analysis of the companyLength: 3 to 4 pagesIn this section you will use balance sheet and income statement information to analyze the company in the areas of profitability, asset utilization, liquidity, and debt utilization. A full ratio analysis must be prepared using at least two ratios from each of these four areas. Your analysis must be over a three year period.In addition to three years of ratios, you must include your observations on the company’s profitability, efficiency in asset utilization, liquidity, and utilization of debt to finance its operations plus any trends your observe (i.e., share key drivers and insights about the positive, neutral or negative impacts from the ratios).Graphs or charts may also be used to support your analysis. Future opportunity assessmentLength: 2 to 3 paragraphsContent: In this section you will discuss future plans the company has to achieve its short and long term goals and objectives and its plans for the future. What are the top growth opportunities the company is focusing on for the next five years? Include a brief overview of the opportunities as well as insights into financing and potential impact to the company.Recommended decision on future investment: Length: 1 to 2 paragraphsContent: Your report must conclude with your recommendation for or against future investment in the company. You must have a clearly stated rationale for your recommendation drawing from your financial analysis and observations. Course Project RubricUnit 7: Course Project RubricCriteriaRatingsPtsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeMade required edits from past submissions15 ptsAll suggested edits were made to the document after considering feedback from past submissions. Edits make sense and integrate well with the flow of the document.13.35 ptsAll suggested edits were made and relatively well integrated into the flow of the document.11.85 ptsMost of the suggested edits were made but not well integrated into the flow of the document.10.35 ptsOnly some of the suggested edits were made and they were not well integrated into the flow of the document.8.85 ptsNo suggested edits were made to the document. Feedback was not considered.15 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeProofreading completion10 ptsProofreading is evident throughout document. The essay contains minimal errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (0 – 1 per page).8.9 ptsProofreading is evident throughout document. The essay contains a few errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (2-3 per page).7.9 ptsProofreading is not thorough throughout the document. The essay contains errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (4 – 5 per page).6.9 ptsProofreading is not thorough throughout the document. The essay contains errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (6 – 7 per page).5.9 ptsProofreading is not thorough throughout the document. The essay contains errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (8+ per page).10 ptsUnitCriteriaRatingsPointsExceptionalAbove ExpectationsMeets ExpectationsDoes Not Meet ExpectationsUnacceptable 2Company history and backgroundAssignment clearly and thoroughly summarized the company’s current industry and history including extensive information on key goods/services, competitors and market evolution.Max Pts: 35Assignment clearly and thoroughly summarized the company’s current industry and history but only included limited information on key goods/services, competitors and market evolution. Max Pts: 31.15Assignment provided a high-level summary of the company’s current industry and history only with no insight into key goods/services, competitors and market evolution.Max Pts: 27.65Assignment provided a high-level summary of the company’s current industry and/or history, but did not provide both. In addition, the assignment conveyed little to no information on the company’s key goods/services, competitors and market evolution.Max Pts: 24.15Assignment provided a high-level summary of the company’s current industry and/or history, but did not provide both. The assignment did not convey the company’s key goods/services, competitors and market evolution.Max Pts: 20.65354Financial history and analysisFinancial Statement Analysis: Assignment clearly and thoroughly articulates the company’s financial performance over a minimum of 3 years and includes numerous insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 40Assignment clearly and thoroughly articulates the company’s financial performance over 2-3 years and includes insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 35.64Assignment provides a high-level summary of the company’s financial performance over 2-3 years and includes limited insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 31.6Assignment provides a high-level summary of the company’s financial performance over 2-3 years and includes no insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios. Max Pts: 27.6Assignment provides a high-level summary of the company’s financial performance over 1-2 years and includes no insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 23.6405Key Ratio AnalysisAssignment clearly and thoroughly articulates the company’s financial performance over a minimum of 3 years and includes numerous insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 40Assignment clearly and thoroughly articulates the company’s financial performance over 2-3 years and includes insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 35.64Assignment provides a high-level summary of the company’s financial performance over 2-3 years and includes limited insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 31.6Assignment provides a high-level summary of the company’s financial performance over 2-3 years but includes no insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 27.6Assignment provides a high-level summary of the company’s financial performance over 1-2 years but includes no insights of the impact of key financial statement line items and ratios.Max Pts: 23.6406Future opportunity assessmentAssignment provides a specific strategy and recommendation for the company’s future opportunity. The essay discusses the opportunity in detail including the investment, funding and impact to the company. The opportunity is financially and strategically appropriate for the company.Max Pts: 30Assignment provides a specific strategy and recommendation for the company’s future opportunity. The essay summarizes the opportunity but provides limited detail on the needed investment, funding and impact. The opportunity is financially and strategically appropriate for the company. Max Pts: 26.7Assignment provides a high level strategy and recommendation for the company’s future opportunity. The essay summarizes the opportunity but provides limited detail on the needed investment, funding and impact. The opportunity is financially and strategically appropriate for the company.Max Pts: 23.7Assignment provides a high level strategy and recommendation for the company’s future opportunity. The essay summarizes the opportunity but provides no detail on the needed investment, funding and impact. The opportunity is financially and strategically appropriate for the company. Max Pts: 20.7Assignment provides a high level strategy and recommendation for the company’s future opportunity. The essay summarizes the opportunity but provides no detail on the needed investment, funding and impact. The opportunity is not financially and strategically appropriate for the company.Max Pts: 17.7307Made required edits from past submissionsAll suggested edits were made to the document after considering feedback from past submissions. Edits make sense and integrate well with the flow of the document.Max pts: 15All suggested edits were made and relatively well integrated into the flow of the document.Max pts: 13.5Most of the suggested edits were made but not well integrated into the flow of the document.Max pts: 11.85Only some of the suggested edits were made and they were not well integrated into the flow of the document.Max pts: 10.35No suggested edits were made to the document. Feedback was not considered.Max pts: 8.8515 24567 Proofreading CompletionProofreading is evident throughout document. The essay contains minimal errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (0 – 1 per page).Proofreading is evident throughout document. The essay contains a few errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (2-3 per page).Proofreading is not thorough throughout the document. The essay contains errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (4 – 5 per page).Proofreading is not thorough throughout the document. The essay contains errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (6 – 7 per page). Proofreading is not thorough throughout the document. The essay contains errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar (8+ per page).10Total210Teacher FeedbackUnit 4Rubric Requirement: Assignment clearly and thoroughly articulates the company’s financial performance over a minimum of 3 years and includes numerous insights of the impact of key financial statement line items. The essay contains minimal errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Max Pts: 50 Feedback: The assignment did not full the requirements. The analysis and discussion were to be focused on key line items in the 3 key financial statements. Instead, this discussed limited ratios, which is what week 5 is focused on. The assignment contained little to no punctuation and grammar errors.Unit 5Rubric Requirement: Assignment clearly and thoroughly articulates the company’s financial performance over a minimum of 3 years and includes numerous insights of the impact of key ratio changes throughout that time. The essay contains minimal errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Max Pts: 50 Feedback: The assignment provided a report of the changes of the key ratios of the project company, but was lacking personal thoughts and opinions of the key drivers and resulting implications. In addition, the assignment contained little to no punctuation and grammar errors.Unit 6Rubric Requirement: Assignment provides a specific strategy and recommendation for the company’s future opportunity. The essay discusses the opportunity in detail including the investment, funding and impact to the company. The opportunity is financially and strategically appropriate for the company. The essay contains minimal errors in spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Max Pts: 40 Feedback: The assignment provided limited insight and analysis into a future opportunity of the project company – it only summarized the investment at a high level but did not provide specific costs or cash flows. The assignment contained little to no punctuation and grammar errors.
Park University Apple Financial Performance Analysis Paper

HUN 1201 Palm Beach State College Nutrition Discussion Post

HUN 1201 Palm Beach State College Nutrition Discussion Post.

I’m working on a social science discussion question and need an explanation to help me study.

Doctors have the ability to test if an individual is genetically predisposed to a disease. A predisposition to a disease means that you may have a genetic link to a certain disease such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. If you were to have a genetic procedure, and the results were positive, meaning you are at high risk to develop a disease, what would you do differently? What changes would you make? Why or why not?Requirements SummaryPost one initial discussion post regarding the topic. Your initial post should be at least 5 sentences and provide detailed and well-thought-out comments regarding the topic. Post one comment to one of your classmates regarding their initial post. Comments to classmates should also be detailed and share your thoughts regarding their comments…just as if you were having a face-to-face conversation. The discussion post to your classmate should be at least 3-5 detailed sentences. Respond to this student’s post:Module 1 DiscussionI think it is amazing that doctors have the ability to test if a person is genetically predisposed to a disease. I personally think it is a blessing because in my case my Dad had a cancer scare, and his mother my Grandma also had a cancer scare. When my Grandma had it, I was still young when she was going through chemo therapy so I didn’t really understand what was happening, but for my Dad it was more recent so it really scared me, just the thought of life without him. It made me want to exercise more meaning intentionally doing more cardio, eating better by buying more vegetables and cutting back on meat which was pretty hard because of my cultural upbringings being Jamaican, and doing everything in my power to make sure I don’t get cancer by not smoking cigarettes. It would have saved me a lot of time and piece of mind if I could have just taken a test to find out if I have a genetic link to certain cancer. If it came back positive, at least I know early enough to start eating the right food to help prevent it, and start building the right lifestyle habits to reduce it, and I have more time to educate myself on the cancer stages and find treatment options before it gets bad.
HUN 1201 Palm Beach State College Nutrition Discussion Post