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Nursing Practicum

Nursing Practicum.

Please complete a one page 300-350 word reflection on the following webinar information and answer the following questions:What strategies for managing scarce resources did you learn from the webinar?Moral Distress, the pandemic – What can each of us do to take ethical care of their patients and care for ourselves? How to Respond toEthical Challenges and Moral Distress during the COVID-19 Pandemic*This 60-minute on-demand webinar is FREE to ALL nurses. You will be able to view this webinar immediately — or anytime, anywhere and as often as you like.You know the physical threat that COVID-19 presents to your patients and to you. The less recognized and acknowledged challenges are the ethical dilemmas that this crisis poses and the moral distress that follows.Presented by two nurse ethicists who are working every day to help nurses navigate these challenges, this on-demand webinar will provide insights and tools for how to cope with these difficult aspects of the pandemic. Using a COVID-19 based case study approach, topics include:How to manage the transition in standards of care from conventional to contingency to crisis standards of careEthical principles in action: Strategies for managing scarce resourcesMoral Distress, the pandemic and you: How to survive the darkest daysWhat each and every individual nurse can and should do to take ethical care of their patients and care for themselvesLink for the webinar:https://event.on24.com/eventRegistration/EventLobb…
Nursing Practicum

UK cities have been continuously grow through centuries. Planning in 1930 and 1940s base on primary legislation, new planning system develop more then 70% of England was subject to interim development control. In early 1950s, UK economics start downturn and looking back to the 17 century the Industrial Revolution break out, size, transport link and wealth of British rapidly increase. New town planning starting from 19 century, national legislation and policy of land development were introduced. Even though actual growth of the new town development in city like London had not been checked, the new town did attract employment and provide over 2million accommodated for people in UK. It is quite successful as show by today social and economy, planning legislation is based on EU legislation. Most of the population before the 1750 in England was rural, population in 1551 — 1751 was doubled from 3 million to 6 million. Urban growth in England happen making a movement from most of the population was rural move to urban area, which location from small market town to more regional centers and occupation people are not only working as farm, town and cities was growth England start to change from world society to urban society. As industrial revolution spread throughout UK, new industry develop increase in factories which dispersed in town, workers form countryside migrate into cities and towns to search for employment therefore population growth as high migration focused on towns form 1801. Instance of Great London, H.G. Well’s Anticipations (1902) envisaged a future London extending up to 70 miles from the centre. In real life, he was not far wrong the capital and the provincial cities were expending in territorial size at a rate faster than population growth itself should indicate. London become the earliest and largest in an industrializing world but hand-in-hand went the perception of urban degeneration. (Gordon E. Cherry and Alan Rogers, 1996,p.29). Population trends reflected a looser housing spread since overcrowding in cities and towns leads to the problem of living condition, diseases spared. Until railways, one of the significant factor promote UK growth, social scale was spread down to suburban living. Coil the other significant factor promote UK growth which had replace the water power . Small firms can operate on its own, many new production process and invention. Other ways to consider both social and economic is like Philanthropic factory owners improve their worker living condition in rural surroundings . Many Industry develop as mechanisation in the factory system after industrial revolution. As a long term authority, local government appear to solve those problem which include the control of new housing and rebuilt with standard condition . All these are economic development making population grow from agriculture change. By 1909, the permissive power provide the Housing, Town Planning Act, during that time a committee was sponsored to consider the provision of dwellings for the working class to the chair, Sir John Tudor Walters, own career. Successful initiative was done on 1735, first green belt were concerned. A discontinuous ring of green belt estates around London was acquired in preserving open space and farmland by the counties around the metropolitan fringe, Thomas (1970). Following the war in 1945, a fundamental change with the Town and Country planning Act In 1947, direct planning of urban area and countryside will be to protect rural settlement from building encroachment and to safeguard agricultural land. The objective was strategic hold over land planning in rural area for many years, up to now, which is examined of settlement planning, village design and green belts. The major feature of the strategy for settlement was for the green belts. In 1947, the Town and Country Planning Act enable local authorities to the use of land from development. Local Authorities outside London was ask to consider establishing clearly defined green belt in 1955 Duncan Sandts, issued on hos own initiative a Departmental Circular (42/55) . A continuous setting for conflict has been provided by the green belt, the development industry, typified by the volume house builders, has been ranged against local householder interests and the countryside. (Gordon E. Cherry and Alan Rogers, 1996,p.191). Therefore after 1947 statutory development plans for all their area and not just for the urban area which make UK countryside now firmly within the remit of professional activity. When a rural area is transformed into an urban area, habitat condition will be changed, which may negatively impact preserved vegetation. The main problem is that natural vegetation cannot be replaced by planning replacement species. Preservation should be secured by the use of legislation, planning, design, contracts and economic measure. In 1995, Government policy on Green Belt is in the revised Planning Policy Guidance (PPG2). The main purposes is the openness and permanence of the Green Belt. A plan was launched by the Deputy Prime Mister in 2003, referred to as,’Substanable Communities: Building for the Future(2003), (Cullingworth
R-studio programing – data science.

1. Use relative paths to load these data frames into R. “`{r, eval=TRUE}“`2. These data are messy. The observational units in `fert`, `life`, and `pop` are locations in space-time (e.g. Aruba in 2017). Recall that tidy data should have one observational unit per row. – Make these data tidy now. – Make sure the new year variable is a numeric. “`{r, eval = TRUE}“`3. Combine these data frames so the fertility rate, population, life expectancy, and the region for each country in each year are in a single data frame.“`{r, eval = TRUE}“`4. Make a scatterplot of fertility rate vs life expectancy, color-coding by region and annotating size by the population. + Include only the years 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2010. Facet by these years. + Interpret the plot in one sentence. + Your final plot should look like this:“`{r, eval=TRUE}“`5. Calculate the total population for each region for each year. Exclude 2018. + Make a line plot of year versus log of total population, color-coding by region. + Interpret the plot in one sentence. + Your final plot should look like this:“`{r, eval = TRUE}“` 6. Make a bar plot of population vs region for the year 2017. + Order the bars on the $y$-axis in **decreasing** order of population. + Your final plot should look like this:“`{r, eval = TRUE}“`
R-studio programing – data science

3 essay questions, each requiring a substantive response, which contains the depth and detail needed to fully answer the primary question and all sub-questions.

3 essay questions, each requiring a substantive response, which contains the depth and detail needed to fully answer the primary question and all sub-questions..

Question 1: Identify and Describe Broken Windows Theory and how it can be used to reduce crime. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of the theory.Of
the weaknesses you’ve identified above, explain what you consider to be
the main criticism of the Broken Windows theory and why.Your essay should be well-developed (3-4 paragraphs) using at least two scholarly references and written in APA format.Use this link – https://apus.libguides.com/er.php then search CMRJ203 – Question 1 is in week 2Question 2:Explain why police patrol methods have remained reactive in nature for decades.

Numerous studies have shown patrol has little effect on crime or the fear of crime. If so, why do departments refuse to change? Your essay should be well-developed (3-4 paragraphs) using at least two scholarly references and written in APA format.Use this link – https://apus.libguides.com/er.php then search CMRJ203 – Question 2 is in week 2Question 3:List
and describe the limitations of modern patrol allocation models. Select
one limitation which you feel is especially concerning and why. What
would you recommend as a possible solution to the limitation you have
identified?Your essay should be well-developed (3-4 paragraphs) using at least two scholarly references and written in APA format.Use this link – https://apus.libguides.com/er.php then search CMRJ203 – Question 3
3 essay questions, each requiring a substantive response, which contains the depth and detail needed to fully answer the primary question and all sub-questions.

De Anza College A Peptide Induced Self Cleavage Reaction Figures 1 and 4 Summary

python assignment help De Anza College A Peptide Induced Self Cleavage Reaction Figures 1 and 4 Summary.

The two images that you must explain are Figures 1 and 4.At the end of your summary, you must also include a few sentences about what you found the most interesting about the article and what you learned most from this assignment.You may need to read sources that are cited throughout the paper and look at the supplemental figures, to fully understand this work. You MUST cite any outside references (i.e., any sources other than the Nguyen BMC Biochemistry paper) that you use in the text and have a list of the references at the end. Your reference page may be separate from the one-page limit.Please limit your essays to one page, double spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font or 11 point Arial font. Your margins should be no smaller than 0.75 inch.
De Anza College A Peptide Induced Self Cleavage Reaction Figures 1 and 4 Summary

Impact of World War 1 on Modernism

Impact of World War 1 on Modernism. How would you describe the impact of the First World War on Modernist visual practices? The aesthetic phenomenon of Modernism, wide-reaching as that term is, can be historically defined as a period that began around 1860, with Manet generally accepted as the first Modernist painter, and came to an end around 1940 – although the murky cross-over between modernism and post-modernism, and the ubiquitous nature of both terms, means that some historians see Modernism stretching to the 1970s. The term applies retrospectively to a wide range of movements, including Futurism, Dada and Cubism, which broadly sought to distance themselves from the values and stylistics of Classicism. In a general aesthetic sense, modern art is often concerned with essential properties of the potential of colour and flatness, and over time a fading interest in subject matter can be witnessed. In fact, in a more specific sense, Modernism can be seen to refer not just to a style or styles of art, but to the philosophy of art as well. From a historical viewpoint, Modernism can be seen as the reaction of art – at least of the progressive artist – to the post-industrial world, a world in which the machine came to be as prominent and ubiquitous as man, and indeed it was in the largest European metropolises, where the tensions of social modernity were most prominent, that the earliest incarnations of Modernism in art appeared. However Modernism is a wide and watered down term, associated with a myriad of differing, and often opposing movements. What draws them together is that they respond to the same situations of the modern world, of the industrialisation of society and the cataclysmic watershed of the First World War. Christopher Witcombe talks of the period of enlightenment in the 18th century, which preceded the advent of Modernism: “Progressive 18th-century thinkers believed that the lot of humankind would be greatly improved through the process enlightenment, from being shown the truth. With reason and truth in hand, the individual would no longer be at the mercy of religious and secular authorities which had constructed their own truths and manipulated them to their own self-serving ends. At the root of this thinking is the belief in the perfectibility of humankind.”[1] According to Witcombe, the roots of modernism lie in the ideals of the Enlightenment, and this is where we can see the new roles of the artist begin to take shape. Essentially, the overarching goal of Modernism, of modern art, has been “the creation of a better society”[2]. But as we shall see, the moralistic idealism of the Enlightenment was not the preferred form for the Modernist movement, which was dragged through the mill of the industrial revolution, and, following hot on its heels, the First World War. There was a sense from the conservative modernists that the way forward was to be guided by existing institutions. The progressives, on the other hand were “critical of institutions as restrictive of individual liberty”[3]. In the 20th century, progressive modernism was thrust into the spotlight, leaving conservative modernism in its wake, with many people sceptical of its artistic merits. The conservative painters of the 19th century attempted to reflect and exemplify a kind of moral Christian virtue, and believed this to be a vital contribution from art to society – the representation of a model of social values to which everyone could aim. Conservative modernism, however, was looked down upon by progressives as an unambitious celebration of the values of the ruling class. Art, progressives argued, should be forward thinking, challenging, as well as socially responsible, whilst conservatives offered little more than a rosy re-hashing of the sepia past. So whilst the conservatives wished to continue existing institutions and favoured a gradual development, progressives criticised ruling institutions and searched for radical upheaval. In the first 10 years of the 20th century, a rapidly escalating political tension and a distrust of and anger toward the social order began to permeate much of European society. The socio-political evidence of this lies in the Russian Revolution and the prominence all over Europe of aggressive radicals. In the art community, this growing unease can be seen in the trend toward a radical simplification of previous stylistics, and in some cases, complete rejection of previous practice. Young painters such as Matisse and Picasso began to cause shockwaves with their embracing of non-traditional perspectives, a re-hauling of the rules of representation as an aesthetic theme, taking risks that even the Impressionists had not dared. At the heart of this new movement was an affection for disruption, and a progression away from Realism, and this began to give a new dimension to the term Modernism. Progressive Modernism was thrust into the spotlight, leaving conservative modernism in its wake, with many people sceptical of its artistic merits. The conservative painters of the 19th century attempted to reflect and exemplify a kind of moral Christian virtue, and believed this to be a vital contribution from art to society – the representation of a model of social values to which everyone could aim. Conservative modernism, however, was looked down upon by progressives as an unambitious celebration of the values of the ruling class. Art, progressives argued, should be forward thinking, challenging, as well as socially responsible, whilst conservatives offered little more than a rosy re-hashing of the sepia past. So whilst the conservatives wished to continue existing institutions and favoured a gradual development, progressives criticised ruling institutions and searched for radical upheaval. Whereas painters like Turner had been respected members of society’s greatest intelligentsia, seen as contributors to the greater good of society, the progressive Modernist saw the deification of traditional values and social structures as stifling, and therefore the artist took on a new persona, that of the righteous revolutionary, and we can see an example of this in the movement known as Futurism, a movement which had its own self-styled manifesto, published in Le Figaro, in an attempt to provoke, incite, and recruit the like-minded. Futurism, like much of 20th century Modernism, was based upon a rejection of the past, and this attitude came to the fore with progressives with the advent of World War One – which represented a cataclysmic failure of the conservative ideals of tradition. For many progressives, the Great War presented an almighty coming together of man and machine in the most morbid possible way, a futile mechanised massacre, which contrasted bitterly with the Modernist treatment of the role of the machine in beauty, and its faith in technology. This was clearly not the way to a healthier society. It has been said that World War One marked the failure of modern art, and a watershed for the emergence of the post-modern. The artistic community took it upon itself to lead the way, as it were, in the post-war society, given the catastrophic failure of many public institutions. After the war, there grew a kind of social vacuum, a sense that there was a lack of people and institutions to believe in. Many artists felt that it was therefore the responsibility of art to orient the collective social aspiration, to shape a new spirit in the wake of such destruction, and the delegitimisation of so many hopes and values. In this way, the Modernist art of the post-war era was at once ultimately moral, hopeful, and rooted in a deep social conscience, but also vividly subversive and challenging in its (many) aesthetic forms – like the best art, the best music, and the best literature, its moral heart lay in its readiness to challenge and confront the spectator. Characterised deeply by the residing antagonism of the industrial revolution, there came about a kind of collective conviction that traditions, institutions, and social frameworks were not perpetual, but rather that they were open to continuing re-evaluation and subjugation, and this attitude can be witnessed in Tristan Tzara’s movement Dada, which gave perhaps the most radical voice to the post-war Modernist. The Dadaists were not content to simply ‘make art’, they wanted to affect all corners of society, to take part in the revolutionary changes which were the inevitable result of the chaos after the War. The aims of the artist became to negate all social and aesthetic traditions, to make every work a new and marginal expression, and better to be bitterly divisive than quietly dormant. Moreover, every artistic manifestation was a form of didactic interaction with social and historical change. So the First World War represented a huge failure of the previous status quo, culminating in the most excruciating and fruitless deaths of millions across the world. A generation of young artists had witnessed men and boys, many at first-hand, perish defending slivers of earth. Machine warfare had become an accepted horror of reality: the dubious honours of war – valour, courage, and heroism, had been sourly debased by the impersonal brutality of the tank and the machine gun. In the face of such fundamentally unthinkable horror, the funds of Realism seemed to be empty, and the view that the human race had been steadily climbing some moral ladder toward enlightenment became utterly banal. As Christopher Witcombe says, “The First World War, at once, fused the harshly mechanical geometric rationality of technology, with the nightmarish irrationality of myth”[4]. And so in the 1920s and onward, Modernism became one of the defining movements of the era, whereas before it had been mostly a minority taste, its luminaries more heard of than heard. As a result of its new found prominence, the mood shifted towards a replacement of the older status quo with a base of new methods. Modernism began to reach prominence in Europe in such pertinent movements as Dada and Surrealism. The tendency under the umbrella of Modernism became to form separate “movements” and develop systems separate to each other – aside from Dada there was the “International style” of Bauhaus and Socialist Realism. By the 1930s, Modernism had entered the Jazz Age, and labels such as “modern” or “hyper-modern” began to proliferate, and the term Modernism began to lose its resonance, like butter scraped across too much toast. After World War Two, consumer culture became the focus of the Modernist artist, as the focus shifted from the graphic, morbid horrors of the two Wars to the more palettable horrors of the popular culture invasion, and the aesthetic outrage of post-war modernism came to be replaced by an aesthetic of sanction. This combination of consumer and modernist cultures led to a total overhaul of the meaning of the term modernism, and can be seen as the beginning of the contemporary form of Postmodernism, replete with its self-referential fixation – as the lines between elite culture and consumer culture had become blurred, and a movement based on the rejection of tradition had become a tradition itself. BIBLIOGRAPHY: Arnason, H. H., History of Modern Art New York: Harry N. Abrams, 4th edition, 1998 Atkins, Robert. ArtSpoke: A Guide to Modern Ideas, Movements, and Buzzwords, 1848-1944. New York: Abbeville Press, 1993 Chipp, Herschel B. Theories of Modern Art Berkeley: University of California Press, 1968 and 1989 Malcolm Bradbury, Modernism 1890-1930, London: Penguin, 1991 Christopher Witcombe, What is Art?, http://witcombe.sbc.edu/modernism/artsake.html, 2000 [1] Christopher Witcombe, What is Art?, http://witcombe.sbc.edu/modernism/artsake.html, 2000 [2] Christopher Witcombe, What Is Art? [3] Christopher Witcombe, What Is Art? [4] Christopher Witcombe, What is Art? Impact of World War 1 on Modernism

GCU Unit 5 Identifying Themes and Characters in Literature Discussion

GCU Unit 5 Identifying Themes and Characters in Literature Discussion.

You are creating a Word Outline and 1-2 page Paper. Please adhere to the instructions below.After completing the Word outline to PowerPoint assignment in the guided instructional lecture, you will create your ownshort Word Outline to PowerPoint presentation for a particular unit of study of which you teach (follow the steps provided in the handout as you create your own). You will write a paper, which of course will be APA compliant. Your paper will consist of a title page, body, reference page, and appendices. The body of the paper will be a one-page overview/summary explaining the unit being supported, the standard, etc. You will have two appendices (Appendix A will be a screen shot of your Word outline, Appendix B will be a screen shot of your PowerPoint slides. (You are evidencing a newly learned skill, writing a summary of the unit, and including screen shots as appendices showcasing your new knowledge).Requirements: APA compliant as listed above, assignment should be in 1 documentVideo Link:https://belhaven.instructure.com/courses/30410/pages/unit-5-lecture-1Attached you will see a presentation of a lesson I have already taught.
GCU Unit 5 Identifying Themes and Characters in Literature Discussion

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