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NU The Five NIST Cybersecurity Framework Core Functions & PCI DSS Discussion

NU The Five NIST Cybersecurity Framework Core Functions & PCI DSS Discussion.

List and describe the five NIST Cybersecurity Framework Core Functions. List the six principles of PCI DSS and describe the 12 requirements within the six overarching PCI DSS principles.Your answers should be written in essay form with a clear intro, body, and conclusion. Use examples as applicable. There is no minimum length but you should clearly answer all parts of each question. Your answer should be in your own words. Short quotes can be used as needed. Cite any references used in APA format.Assignment Formatting Requirements:APA Standard 1-inch margins all aroundStandard font (e.g., Arial, Times Roman, Calibri, Tahoma, etc.)12-pt font sizeDouble-spacedNo cover page – use a simple heading at the top of the first page with Course #/Title, Exam Name, Your Name, and Date (this heading can be left-justified, centered or right-justified)No AbstractIdentify the question number for each response (e.g., “Essay Question #1”) – do not repeat the actual question textWhen using external sources, list the references immediately following the end of the essay question where used (do not put all references at the end of the document)Start Q2 on a new page
NU The Five NIST Cybersecurity Framework Core Functions & PCI DSS Discussion

Wireless power involves the transmission of power without using wires or cords. Use of Wireless power transfer technology can lessen or eradicate the need for batteries and wires. Although wireless power has several benefits to the community and the environment, it, also, has negative implications. This paper will focus on some forms of wireless power transmission, as well as, negative and positive implications of wireless transmission for the environment. Nikola Tesla introduced the idea of wireless power transmission, in early 20th century. Tesla came up with the notion of electrostatic induction, which entails making exceedingly high potential and alternating variations amid two bits of metal using a tool similar to a Tesla coil. A field that is electric would be rotating back and forth liberating energy to be arrested by a receiver, among these metal bits. Tesla believed this could be valuable as it would be possible to move the lights anywhere without a cord. Besides, Tesla hypothesized that by structuring two vast Tesla coils, it would be possible to create this outcome in the entire world. Since then, many notions about the same have emerged, with resonant inductive coupling being the most potential technology. Resonant inductive coupling uses the basics of wave harmonics to form a strong connection of magnetic waves, which resonate at a similar frequency of harmonic magnetic waves, from 2 coils. Several studies reveal that this technology is extremely competent. Wireless power transmission can be used in many areas, where the wired power may be unsuitable. However, wireless power technology has many demerits, despite its many applications. Similar to wired power, wireless power has a restricted range. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More However, the range of wired power is clearly visible, since it becomes restricted by a chord, whereas the range of wireless power is not visible as it becomes revealed by a signal. The range of wireless power that gets created by resonant induction coupling can be established from the radius of the coil. High efficiency occurs near the coil’s radius. Besides, considering its 80% effectiveness, wireless power is less efficient than the usual wired systems. This is because a wireless system some power gets utilized in forming the magnetic field that relays the power from one coil to the other while in a wired system much of the power that becomes directed into a circuit gets to its destination (Glindogdu

Effects of Classroom Discource on Reading Comprehension

Effects of Classroom Discource on Reading Comprehension. Nystrand, M. (2006). Research on the role of classroom discourse as it affects reading comprehension. Research in the Teaching of English, 392-412. In this journal, Martin Nystrand, examines the role of American classroom discourse and specifically at how discussions affect students within the language arts instruction and reading comprehension. Nystrand explains that there is already a vast amount of research related to classroom discourse and with recent research associated to the teacher’s discourse position. The author points out that efficient classroom spoken communication needs to be seen as a tool for instruction rather than a means to measure achievable gains. The analysis begins by looking at previous research to uncover the uses of classroom discourse in America that has not changed for more than one and a half centuries. This was done by reviewing how classroom discourse on reading comprehension was conducted by using previous empirical investigations. Previous research in American schools show a number of methods used such as narration which used to be the method of choice. Contrary to the European system, teachers generally used lectures to amass new knowledge in class according to Burstall (1909). It was evident that the two methods clashed as one would only display knowledge while the other was used to acquire knowledge and develop it as Stevens (1912) claimed. Benjamin Bloom (1954) stated that instructional time was used by the teachers at least 50% of the time and mentioned that discussion was better suited for problem solving. There seems to be two types of teachers, transmission-oriented teachers who impart information and interpretation-oriented instructors who encourage students to think outside the box. While considerable progress has been made for example: genres of questioning, approaches to group discussions, and patterns of interaction between students, the author argues that a lot more work needs to take place. Unfortunately, the majority of these studies were only focused on middle and high schools which did not paint a full picture. Therefore, further investigations are necessary, for instance; looking into the effects of different negotiations on reading comprehensions or applying event history analysis that will analyse patterns and dynamics of discourse. As time progresses, so does new theories and methodologies on how discourse has an effect on reading comprehension. What is of particular interest to me is the different types of teachers and where I fit in when I teach in relation to the article. It leads me to believe that teachers would need further training to find a balance between the two and elicit student’s creative thinking, something is not so common in the Eastern Asia. Kayi-Aydar, H. (2013). Scaffolding language learning in an academic ESL classroom. ELT journal, 67(3), 324-335. The author gives a comprehensive overview of the concept of scaffolding. The study reflects how learners and teachers are able to use scaffolding during three task interactions. The investigation concentrates on language and how it was used to build and mediate meaning and how “power relations” affect it within a classroom setting. It comprised of nine voluntary students and an experienced teacher in an advanced ESL to improve oral skills. Observation would take place for 15 weeks with only five hours of instruction time. An analysis of what was said, how it was responded to and what was accomplished, using an adapted criterion to formulate a hypothesis, was used to decide whether scaffolding was effective. Formal lectures were led by the teacher who would introduce content she found important. This method turned out to be the most effective as the teacher’s active role of guidance enabled students to take turns and ask questions thereby allowing them to be more involved during the discourse. Small group work had students work with their colleagues to complete tasks such as grammar or vocabulary exercises. One student was nominated as acting teacher role. During the task, students were not given equal opportunities to have their say and sometimes were not even acknowledged. This led to disinterest of the task and the group were not collaborating. The acting teacher became an evaluator and did not provide adequate guidance to the rest of the students. The student-led whole group discussion was the least successful of the three. A student would be chosen as the discussion leader and given a topic to discuss. However, discourse only happened between outspoken students (“Power relations”) which dominated the lesson while others drowned in the process. A couple of examples of scaffolding occurred but only between the dominant students. It was unclear whether this scaffolded their peers’ learning. Finally, the author gives a different perspective on traditional teaching methods by providing us with her study on “power relations” and scaffolding. She concludes from her evidence that, unless guidance is provided to support students, power struggles occurred. Strong accents increased difficulty in understanding. The classroom environment also became competitive rather than collaborative leaving students feeling reluctant to participate. This inhibited other learners from progressing which resulted there being no effective scaffolding. This article provided me with a fundamental understanding that for any scaffolding to be successful, teachers would have to provide assistance but not so much that it over-empowers the discourse. Although it was a good idea to have students lead the discussion, the ‘power relations can dominate the overall experience leaving some students to feel left out. This is something which needs to be addressed by maybe having certain written guidelines for the student leading the discussion. Morcom, V. (2014). Scaffolding social and emotional learning in an elementary classroom community: A sociocultural perspective. International Journal of Educational Research, 67, 18-29. Veronica Morcom provides us with a qualitative study on social practices of two elementary classrooms from two socioeconomic areas for the duration of a whole year for both studies. The authors main focus is to understand the important role of emotions and relationships by scaffolding social and emotional learning through values education. Morcom states that further research is needed to understand and help student’s social and emotional needs via scaffolding within a zone of proximal development (ZPD). Various theoretical viewpoints are described such as sociocultural theory, ZPD’s, assisted learning, collaborative learning, collaboration in a community of practice (COP) and lastly scaffolding within the affective ZPD which is where this study begins. The qualitative methodology of using a questionnaire was believed to be inappropriate and instead, an action plan was created to find the statistics by process of ‘plan, act and reflect’. Furthermore, since the teacher was conducting the research, it was argued that the study would be more authentic as there would already be a relationship established between the students and the teacher. Data would be pooled from various sources such as the students, parents and teachers. This would then be compared and analysed with the data from field notes, interpretation of video transcripts and class activities. It is clear from the evidence that negotiated values during the social practices enable students to feel part of a community that shared the same values. They were then able to work together as a collective rather than as individuals and built friendships which provided a mutual ongoing support from their peers. The author states that this could probably be a positive factor as it demonstrates that relationships are key to ameliorating academic success. However, the limitations are that the teacher’s capacity to respond to students emotional and social needs would have to be developed in order to provide for them. Western education systems tend to lean towards creating a friendly environment as it can affect the student’s educational progress if they do not feel comfortable. The author draws on a student’s emotional needs within an educational environment and how it should be catered for which is a field I have not dwelled on before but is of great interest to me and my teaching practices in the future. Anton, M. (1999). The discourse of a Learner‐Centered classroom: Sociocultural perspectives on Teacher‐Learner interaction in the Second‐Language classroom. The Modern Language Journal, 83(3), 303-318. In this article, Marta Anton sets out to study students immersed in negotiation with the intention to demonstrate how various communicative moves and linguistic forms help to accomplish functions of scaffolding within a zone of proximal development. She focuses on learner-centered and teacher-centered dialogue between the two in a second language classroom. Based on Communicative Language Teaching (CLT), classes would benefit and progress by switching from traditional teacher-centered methodologies to a learner-centered classroom environment. To maximise the student’s communicative potential, CLT expresses that students should work in small groups and that it is the teacher’s responsibility to engage the students in situations that will promote communication. Various researchers convey that traditional approaches to discourse is often limited as the teacher dominates the interaction in the attempt to transmit their knowledge onto the learners. After describing sociocultural theory, scaffolding and the zone of proximal development, the author explains how two types of classes proceed. The Italian class that sees the dominant teacher-centered approach and a French class that focuses more on the learner-centered approach with assistance. The data showed that learners working in collaboration, as stated by CLT, can contribute positively towards the understanding of form and meaning. Examples showing various methods of scaffolding taking place are given where the teacher provides adequate support for the students to find a solution in a grammar presentation. This communicative move is known as dialogic or proleptic teaching as it does not follow the traditional inductive methods where students focus on structures and guess linguistic patterns themselves. There was also a transfer of negotiation of responsibility which is considered an imperative feature of proleptic instruction. Other functions in the French class included actively engaging the students to focus and reflect on forms, simplification of the tasks, turn allocation and providing feedback. The research successfully proves that when learners engage in negotiation with their teachers, scaffolding does take place away from the confines of traditional teacher-centered techniques. It is evident that group work has a positive effect on language learning through discourse within a learner-centered environment which gives me a deeper understanding about group work as a whole. Although I agree with the argument in general, I believe that cultural differences exist that may withhold certain groups from participating and engaging in discourse fully which could limit scaffolding from taking place correctly. Xie, X. (2009). Why are students quiet? Looking at the Chinese context and beyond. ELT journal, 64(1), 10-20. In this article, Xiaoyan Xie attempts to ascertain whether teacher-student interaction can reveal how teaching practices in China prevent students from interacting and developing their own ideas. Contrary to the Western world, previous research suggests that Chinese students seem to have something preventing them from participating further in class and researchers believe that this was due to their ‘cultures of learning’ and traditional values. The author suggests that these are not the only factors and that only a certain kind of environment can produce and promote good interaction for cognitive development coupled with adequate assistance. According to the author, if teachers were less controlling over certain elements of the class, then students would be far more productive and willing to participate. The study investigated two groups of thirty students and two very skilled teachers to instruct Integrated Reading over the course of a two-and-a-half-month timeframe. Teachers followed mandatory textbooks but could choose which sections they were going to teach. Students and teachers could reflect on the lessons and make suggestions through stimulated reflection (SR). The data was collected and ran through a qualitative data analysis computer software where recurrent trends were shown. The author states that in the cases of both groups, the teachers followed strict controlled classroom interaction procedures which is believed to be detrimental to the student’s negotiation skills and learning opportunities. It was clear after the SR’s that the teachers were narrowminded as they would reject what was said or would signal an undesired reply. When students contributed through an Initiation, Response, Follow-up sequence, the teacher overtook the student’s ideas and developed it herself. Teachers had only prepared for certain answers and did not know how to respond which deprived students from discussing the topic further and expressing themselves. Furthermore, the teacher did not take into consideration students personal experiences and saw responses as errors because they did not match her personal views. In all the SR’s, students expressed their wish for further discourse. Finally, the author makes it clear that the teachers play a huge controlling role and not allowing students to contribute. The question of how much freedom to allow in classroom participation remains unclear. I agree with the author and the significance of this article which clearly demonstrates that a student’s ability to interact in Eastern Asia is bound by what teachers believe to be true. The author implies that the teacher only follows strict rules therefore limiting the student’s communicative competence. References Vygotsky, L. S.,Effects of Classroom Discource on Reading Comprehension

CCA 303 Miami University Creative Capital Art Organization PPT and Essay

essay writer free CCA 303 Miami University Creative Capital Art Organization PPT and Essay.

I’m working on a art & design project and need a sample draft to help me study.

The Final Project will be a paper and PowerPoint that draws upon concepts and topics from the class. In this project, you will explore an Arts Organization and an event they have scheduled and the community in which they exist. Using this information, your create a plan in which this Arts Organization can connect with, better represent and engage the community they would identify as their target audience. Paper: This 2,000 word essay should address the following sections:-Brief description of the Arts Organization selected-Description of the community that the arts organization is located in and/or serves (sometimes arts organizations serve communities that they are not specifically located in).-Description of the specific event selected (virtual events are fine)-Description of any past arts engagement or community engagement that this organization has offered.-Your proposal for arts engagement for your selected event. Make sure to address how your arts organization can engage communities through events, online engagements, in person or virtual programs, etc.PowerPoint: This should be 10-15 slides that are saved as a PDF that “present” your proposal (the last section of your paper). Imagine you are creating this presentation to share with the Arts Organization to pitch them your proposed Arts Engagement plan. Think about including interesting visuals and infographics. The PowerPoint should stand alone and be able to be read by someone without the live presentation.
CCA 303 Miami University Creative Capital Art Organization PPT and Essay

Customer Relationship: Best Buy, the Body Shop and Walmart Essay

Customer Relationship: Best Buy, the Body Shop and Walmart Essay. Introduction In the last few decades, customer relationship management (CRM) has been developed as competitive advantage strategy. In fact, as competition intensifies among all retailers, CRM has become one of the most effective strategies of maximizing their share of wallet. It is imperative to review the tenets of CRM strategies that retailers use to earn sustainable competitive advantage as more and more similar businesses spring every day. Customer relationship management is the first step towards customer relationship and to expand the distribution channels that attract near markets. Reflectively, the concept revolves around a comprehensive review of ‘push and pull’ factors which determine functionality of a retail business to offer an alternative strong marketing tool in the quest for quality, reliability, and trust among clients. A properly CRM is crucial in presenting brand knowledge, awareness, penetration strategy, and passing information to target audience. This analytical treatise attempts to explicitly review the application of CRM in three categories of retail formats. These categories are department store (Best Buy), specialty store (The Body Shop), and discount department store (Walmart). Department Store (Best Buy) Best Buy has employed the laggard activism strategy to not only capture the global market, but also leapfrog the dominant Amazon Company. The store operates on the Customer-to-Customer (C2C) platform and Business-to-Business (B2B) platforms. As a result, the Best Buy has penetrated the global market due to a balance in factors such as the Western business style, global business approach, and flexible organizational structure (Best Buy, par. 6). In order to penetrate the expanding global market, Best Buy’s business platform was modified through introduction of services such as premium customer experience, compact support from the community, and low charges for loyal customer. For instance, the Customer-to-Customer platform adopted by Best Buy has created and successfully implemented the marketing strategy to ensure customer loyalty and market expansion. The company’s product multi-branding as a positioning strategy has enabled it to survive competition. For instance, the online shopping is tailed to address the individual customer needs. Besides, the company has managed to balance the elements of intangibility, inseparability, and heterogeneity in the 4Ps of its market mix due to improved product visibility for each target customer segment (Rai 23). The most notable CRM strategy adopted by the Best Buy is the contact management since it provides a decision support system to select the best market access on suitability, distribution structure, and integration of contact channels among the customers. The contact management system in the store takes the form of Debit card services, online support shopping, and a 24-hour call center to connect to their customers. This system is constantly upgraded through value –added services. Keeping these channels restricted has helped the store to boost customer confidence in keeping their particulars safe. In order to guarantee safety, the Best Buy’s contact management system is built using standard operating procedures to promote consistency in processing customer data and all other channels. The more the consistency, the more the information that can be shared amongst various channels creating more business resources to be used in customer service delivery. For instance, the Best Buy’s call center has been successful in addressing client concerns in a timely and professional way (Best Buy, par. 5). The goal of these CRM strategies at the Best Buy is to concentrate on the local market through use of an open-system business model. The strategy was meant to take advantage of the challenge of ‘smallness’ as compared to other giant stores offering electronic products such as Sony. The store depends on the closed-system approach in execution of its business strategies. Unlike other stores which developed a fixed entry strategy in the market that was characterized by overconfidence and inertia, the Best Buy was packaged as a humble and flexible online technological trading platform. As a result of the stable knowledge of the global market, Best Buy jumpstarted operations through a flexible and rational business decision processes. It is apparent that the Best Buy store has efficient knowledge and experience in uniqueness of products and services as part of its CRM strategies (Rai 29). Specialty store (The Body Shop) The Body Shop store is a shop that deals in beauty products such as skin care, hair care, lotions, make up, and community trade. The store currently offers online shopping to its consumers within admirable standards of online safety. Security and safety over the cyberspace has become such an important issue in determining consumer behavior. The online business model of the store offers the Secure Online Shopping System (SOSS) to its customers. Secure online shopping system is a platform where consumers of the product are able to make orders on particular product and make payments using their credit cards (The Body Shop, par. 3). The store has cleverly rolled out a traditional-online client interaction strategy as part of its customer relationship management. This element revolves around saving money by offering affordable products to customers who buy online. As a result, the Body Shop’s customers have better offers due to consistent and attractive discounts for online clients. The store has always aspired to provide quality products and services to customers. Besides, the company has a very active customer care team that is prompt in responding to requests and complaints from customers (Rai 13). As a market leader and the largest beauty shop in the US, the store has initiated several support services to customers and communities surrounding its branches. The Body Shop store has made the shopping experience an easy task with its strategy of all-under-one-roof. A customer is in a position to literally find all types of beauty products within a single location. This saves on time besides allowing a customer to plan for a single shopping activity that covers for all his or her needs. To support this mission, the store has one of the most attractive reward plans for its loyal customers in the form of shopping points that are redeemable, seasonal discounts, and annual rewards. Besides, the store does free delivery for purchases above certain amount. In addition, the store has special vouchers that target corporate organizations and private customers. The offers are in the form of price, quality, and quantity. When information on attitude is verifiable, it is easy for a company to execute a well researched plan within allocated resources. The processed information is used by consumers in making the buying decision since SOSS provides consumers with the platform to locate products instantly on internet (The Body Shop, par. 5). Discount Department Store (Walmart) As one of the largest supermarkets in the US, the Walmart Supermarket has created a sustainable business through its dynamic style of management and strategic planning. The Walmart Supermarket operates on the business pillars such as persuasive merchandise, balanced business channels, uninterrupted business growth, and establishment of assessment in service delivery as part of its CRM strategies. These strategies are aimed at ensuring continuous expansion and customer satisfaction. The vision supports the Business to Customer (B2C) strategy for sustainable business. As one of the largest supermarkets in Canada, the Walmart Supermarket has created a sustainable business through its dynamic style of management and strategic planning. These strategies are aimed at ensuring continuous expansion and customer satisfaction. As reported in the 2013/2014 financial year preliminary report of the Walmart Supermarket, the company was in a position to instigate more than six thousand product brands that target different market segments (Walmart, par. 5). As a market leader and the third largest supermarket brand in the US, the Walmart Supermarket has initiated several support services to customers and communities surrounding its branches. As indicated in the preliminary report for the 2013/2014 financial year, the supermarket initiated 25 different support services to the community. Besides, the Walmart Supermarket has been in the forefront of promoting wellness through its healthy customer initiative. These initiatives have enabled the Walmart Supermarket to expand rapidly due to improved customer loyalty. Moreover, the Walmart Supermarket has managed to penetrate the traditional markets as the suppliers always perform the function of marketing the supermarket to potential customers (Walmart, par. 3). In the Walmart Supermarket, the management is keen on ensuring that its suppliers meet the standards outlined in the suppliers’ code of conduct. This practice has a number of benefits for the organization. First, it ensures that the supermarket receives quality goods since the supply chain is monitored and managed at all levels. Also, vetting enables the Walmart Supermarket to comply with various regulatory requirements that ensures that the company and its clients are protected at legal and ethical levels (Rai 19). Comparative analysis Consumers are generally influenced by two factors: internal influences and external influences. Internal influences are personal feelings and thought that includes; self-concept, motivation, attitudes, emotions and perceptions. These factors generally influence perception, purchasing patterns, and attitude customers develop towards a product or a service offered by business (Rai 35). Besides, these factors are directly linked to internal and external interacting social aspects that control the pattern of though and expressed feelings. The above stores have attractive CRM strategies which are unique to each business environment. These strategies are meant to improve business sustainability through competitive advantage assurance. Comparatively, the Best Buy has the best CRM strategies such they are incorporated in the online and offline customer management. For instance, adoption of the hybrid system of management by the Best Buy was meant to ensure direct contact with customers within the shortest time possible. The hybrid system is very successful in contact management and positive attitude reassurance (Rai 23). Attitude is the general evaluation that consumers engage in before deciding to purchase a particular product or service. Attitudes are direct personal experiences that are influenced by consumers’ personality, advertisement, family, and friends. On the other hand, the Body Shop boasts of a customized consumer relationship management since its line of business is specialized. Despite being effective, the CRM strategies of the Body Shop are not diverse or flexible to different clients segments since its market is stratified. The CRM strategies of the Walmart store are the least effective when compared to the others. This is because its model of running the customer assurance strategies does not allow for the customer preference tracking process and live feedbacks. Works Cited Best Buy. About Us. 2014. Rai, Alok. Customer Relationship Management: Concepts and Cases, London, UK: Kogan Page, 2012. Print. The Body Shop. About Us. 2014. Walmart. About Us. 2014. Customer Relationship: Best Buy, the Body Shop and Walmart Essay

Cuyumaca College Surrounded by Monsters Created by Jeffrey Jerome Cohennarrative Essay

Cuyumaca College Surrounded by Monsters Created by Jeffrey Jerome Cohennarrative Essay.

This week we are starting our final project (Project 3) which is a research essay. The topic of this unit is monsters (real and imagined) and how they function in society. If working on this research papers on monsters (real or imaginary) is triggering or difficult to work with, please notify me as I have an alternate prompt that I can discuss with you.Because much of our work in the first two units of this course was spent discussing race and culture, we will be analyzing monsters through the lens of race, culture and disability, and how monsters represent the other.Remember, the goal or task for this assignment is ONLY to read through the materials and then answer the two questions at the bottom of this assignment.First, let’s go over the due dates of the essay before we consider the prompt.Draft for Peer Review Due: Friday Week 13 by 11:59pmFinal Draft Due: Wednesday Week 14 by 11:59pmStep 1: Review the Prompt.Essay: Using a Text as a Lens (Synthesis)ObjectivesUse all phases of the writing process to create a largely error free essay, understand and use an academic article to analyze an element of culture, research, synthesize, integrate, and contextualize multiple outside sources (through quotations, paraphrasing, and summary) with their own voice, analysis, or position, while avoiding plagiarism. Employ a variety of organizational patterns to support or advance central ideas (theses/claims).Minimum Length6-10 pagesPrompt: Your goal is to argue whether or not Cohen’s theses are valid – that this argument is or is not an effective way of analyzing society’s understanding of race and culture through the monsters it engenders.Your thesis can either use first person POV language, ie. I agree/I disagree with Cohen… or you can use third person POV language, ie. Cohen is successful/Cohen is unsuccessful…Successful essays will do this by:Including an introduction that draws in the reader, briefly introduces Cohen and the topic of your essay, and has a clear thesis that states your argument and signals a plan for the essay.Creating a literature review that establishes and explains Cohen’s theories in a body paragraph. Summarize his main argument, claims, and evidence. Discuss his ideas as if you were explaining them to someone who was unfamiliar with the text. Your lit review will also include rhetorical analysis on intended audience, tone, and purpose. In your literature review, remember you must cover Thesis 1 and 4. Remember to add to the literature review the parts of Cohen you have written down on the “Breaking Down Cohen” Worksheet.Finding at least three different monsters of your own to prove or disprove Cohen’s theses through the lens of culture and race. (You may also focus on three different interpretations of the same monster. Example: Zombies from Night of the Living Dead 1968, Zombieland 2009, and Warm Bodies 2013). You could use movie monsters, TV monsters, literary monsters, mythical or fairy tale monsters, and/or real, historical monsters. The choice is yours. This section of the paper will be where you include your outside sources to strengthen your analysis.Consider any of the movies or texts we have watch or read so far for your monsters.Also, many of you are reading a text that contains characters that can be seen as “monsters,” think about using those for your monster choices.Including at least three outside sources to strengthen your argument. The three sources must be in addition to Cohen’s chapter – find a mix of peer reviewed and popular sources that support your analysis of the monsters and society. Don’t just rely on your interpretations and opinions – find others who agree with you! Your outside sources should be connected to your monsters in that they support your understanding of the monsters you have chosen.Look for these outsides sources through Cuyamaca’s LibraryIf you need help finding outside sources that fit these requirements, please contact me.Feel free to also use any of the readings, podcasts, and TED Talks I have already assigned or posted for this paper as well.Including vivid and specific details when describing the monsters you have chosen, and tie your examples to Cohen’s theses.Synthesizing by combing information from different sources to inform and support a greater understanding of your argument.Finishing with a conclusion that restates your thesis, reviews your body paragraphs, and a final though, prediction, piece of advice, something you learned or realized or the answer to a question you posed earlier.Suggested Formats for Your EssayBy Monster FormatParagraph 1: IntroductionParagraph 2: Literature ReviewParagraph 3: Monster 1Paragraph 4: Monster 2Paragraph 5: Monster 3Paragraph 6: ConclusionYou may have one or more paragraph per monster.This format is a better choice if you are using different or more than one of the theses per monster.This format is also a better choice if you are choosing three different types of the same monster.By Theses (Cohen’s) FormatParagraph 1: IntroductionParagraph 2: Literature ReviewParagraph 3: Cohen’s ThesisParagraph 4: Cohen’s ThesisParagraph 6: Conclusion.This format is a better choice if you have different monsters that prove the same thesis.Words to Use in Your Synthesis PaperArgumentative:affirmsarguesconfirmscontendsdeniesdisagreesbelievesconcedesinsistsrejectsrespondsemphasizesResearch:addsrevealsstatesmentionsfindsverifiesEmphasis:allegeswarnsadvisesadmitscomplainsholdspredictsproposesacknowledgesspeculatessuggestsStep Two: Read the Sample Essay.Now, let’s look at an essay written by a student in a previous class of mine who scored a perfect score on a similar assignment. The focus of her essay was Godzilla in three Godzilla movies. This essay is the first essay in this Sample Student packet. You only need to review the first essay, but if you wish you can read the rest.Essay 4 Sample Student Essay .pdfMinimize File PreviewStep Three: Answer the following questions.Do you have any questions for me about the prompt or the sample essay?Do you have any anxiety or confusion over completing this writing task to the best of your ability?PreviousNext
Cuyumaca College Surrounded by Monsters Created by Jeffrey Jerome Cohennarrative Essay