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NSG 456 Phoenix Week 1 Saline Instillation and Quantitative Research Methods

NSG 456 Phoenix Week 1 Saline Instillation and Quantitative Research Methods.

Assignment ContentThis assignment is designed to help you understand the differences between qualitative and quantitative research designs, as well as select the appropriate method for the research question you have been working on throughout the course.Step 1: Restate your Week 1 research question and select the method of research (quantitative or qualitative) that is most appropriate for it. Check out this link to make sure your research question is aligned with your research method: https://researchguides.library.wisc.edu/c.php?g=861013&p=6170079Step 2: Summarize the major steps in that type of research.Step 3: Determine the specific type or approach (i.e., quasi-experimental, phenomenological, etc.) you would employ and explain why that is the best selection. https://www.formpl.us/blog/quantitative-qualitative-researchStep 4: Explain potential data.Step 5: Explain how analyzing and interpreting that data can inform your research question.Format your assignment as one of the following:18- to 20-slide presentation15- to 20-minute oral presentation875-word paperAnother format approved by your instructorCite at least one peer-reviewed resource in APA format.Submit your assignment.Week 1 research question is attached.
NSG 456 Phoenix Week 1 Saline Instillation and Quantitative Research Methods

In the contemporary world with its rapid technological progress the issue of adoption of the innovative technologies by the businesses is frequently discussed. In theory, the adoption of the latest inventions and their integration into business process is highly effective and helps to maximize productivity and working process of the companies. Yet, the vast majority of small businesses turn out to be reluctant towards the adoption of new technologies. This happens due to several reasons among which there are such causes as cost of technology adoption and integration, human factor, and the speed of technological development of the contemporary world. One of the biggest potential disadvantages that prevent small businesses from the adoption of new technologies is the cost (Hamel, 2015). The introduction of innovative technologies to a business requires investments. The leaders and owners of small businesses have to carefully evaluate the costs and benefits of such investments. Besides, Hamel (2015) also notes that the integration of new technologies is also a costly process because when the employees start learning how to use the freshly introduced innovations their productivity normally decreases. For small businesses with lower revenues adoption of new technologies often turns out unreasonably expensive this is why they prefer to keep functioning in the habitual way. If the adoption ends up ineffective this will lead to a loss of income which a large company would be able to overcome in some time, but for a small business such loss may simply become fatal. Human factor is another serious reason preventing small businesses from the adoption of new technologies. Being reluctant to accept change is a part of human nature, we arrange our surroundings in a suitable way, we get used to them and then we experience discomfort when something changes. The old technology needs to become of no use at all for us to have a desire to give it up and try something new. This way, one of the most common obstacles to the adoption of new technologies by small businesses is lack of necessity (Fitzgerald, Kruschwitz, Bonnet

Language and Bias

Language and Bias. Paper details   Paper Criteria: Write in paragraph form Argument In 1-2 paragraphs, identify the argument: The title, author, and publication of the article. The issue and conclusion of the author. Explain at least three reasons the author gives to support the argument. Audience: Who is the author appealing to in the article? Analysis In 3-4 paragraphs, analyze the argument for the following: Explain the author’s values that are evident in the argument. Why do you think the author values this? Based on the values, explain the author’s assumptions in the argument. Why do they hold these assumptions? Was there any research to support the argument or was there a lack of research? Does that strengthen or weaken the argument? What fallacies were used in the argument? Name the fallacy and explain how it was used in the argument. Do you think using these fallacies was effective? Why or why not? Identify and explain any connotative, questionable, or bias language used throughout the article? Was the language effective in the argument? Why or why not? Does this connotative, questionable, or bias language cause the argument to be biased in any way? Why or why not Response In 1-2 paragraphs, evaluate and share your thoughts on the argument: Do you believe the argument was good enough to support the conclusion? Why or why not? Most importantly, do you agree or disagree with the author’s argument? Provide at least three reasons to support your point. Suicide refers to death caused by an intentional, self-inflicted injury or act of violence that is performed with the intent of dying. Suicide is commonly known as killing oneself or taking one’s own life. The term suicide attempts refers to self-directed violence or potentially injurious behaviors performed with the intent of dying that do not result in death. The continuum of suicidal behaviors also includes suicidal ideation, or the process of thinking about, preparing for, or planning suicide. As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), youths between age ten and nineteen accounted for 3,008 of the 47,173 deaths by suicide in the United States in 2017, or 2.49 deaths per 100,000 people for youths ages ten to fourteen and 11.79 deaths per 100,000 for youths ages fifteen to nineteen. Although the suicide rate is highest among middle-aged and older adults, suicide is a significant and growing problem among teenagers. Between 1999 and 2017, the suicide rate for girls ages ten to fourteen rose from 0.5 to 1.7 per 100,000 people and from 2.8 to 5.4 for girls ages fifteen to nineteen. Among boys, rates rose from 1.9 to 3.3 for ten- to fourteen-year-olds and from 13.1 to 18.0 for fifteen- to nineteen-year-olds. These changes mirrored an increase in the country’s suicide rate across almost all age groups. After declining for more than a decade beginning in the mid-1980s, the overall suicide rate in the US increased by 33 percent between 1999 and 2017, from 10.5 to 14.0 deaths per 100,000 people. For young people between ages fifteen and nineteen in the United States, suicide ranks second only to unintentional injuries (including motor vehicle crashes) as the leading cause of death, or 2,491 deaths in 2017. This total includes 1,938 boys and 553 girls. The most common methods of teen suicide were firearms, suffocation (including hanging), and poisoning. Results of the CDC’s 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) found that 17.2 percent of high school students had seriously considered attempting suicide in the previous year, 13.6 percent had made a suicide plan, 7.4 percent had attempted suicide, and 2.4 percent were injured in a suicide attempt. Female students were significantly more likely to report having made a suicide plan than male students (17.1 percent vs. 9.7 percent) and to have made a suicide attempt (9.3 percent vs. 5.1 percent). RISK FACTORS AND WARNING SIGNS Teen suicide typically involves many contributing factors rather than a single, identifiable cause. Several different situations, conditions, and characteristics have been found to increase the risk that a young person will engage in suicidal behavior. For example, the National Alliance on Mental Illness reports that 90 percent of teens who died by suicide have an underlying mental health condition, such as depression, anxiety, or an eating disorder. A family history of suicide and previous suicide attempts are also major risk factors. Many teen suicides occur during times of emotional crisis, when young people feel unable to cope with common sources of stress, such as peer pressure, bullying at school and online, social isolation, relationship problems, or high expectations for academic achievement. Stressful family situations—including financial hardships, death, divorce, domestic violence, abuse, or neglect—can also contribute to suicidal behavior. Young people in vulnerable groups that are likely to experience discrimination or marginalization, such as racial and ethnic minorities and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) teens, also face an elevated risk of suicide. Many teens at risk for suicide exhibit one or more warning signs, which often mimic the symptoms of depression. As reported by the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP), indications that a young person may be at high risk for suicide include major changes in personality, changes in eating or sleeping habits, withdrawal from friends and family, a decline in his or her quality of schoolwork, neglect of personal hygiene or appearance, feelings of hopelessness or worthlessness, disruptive or reckless behavior, and substance abuse. Many teens who are contemplating suicide provide verbal clues about their intentions. For instance, they may talk about being a burden to others, having no reason to live, or wanting to die. Some suicidal teens prepare by organizing their bedrooms, giving away their favorite possessions, or writing notes to friends and relatives. The AACAP advises that recognizing these warning signs and seeking medical attention for young people at risk can help prevent teen suicide. SUICIDE CONTAGION AND SUICIDE CLUSTERS Researchers have found that suicide rates can increase among groups of people following exposure to suicide—a phenomenon known as suicide contagion. Suicide contagion can affect people who are exposed to suicide directly, by having a suicide victim among their family members or peers, or indirectly, by hearing about a suicide through news reports or social media. Both types of exposure have been linked to increases in suicidal thoughts and behaviors among people who are at risk for suicide. Studies have found that youths between ages fifteen and nineteen are more susceptible to suicide contagion than any other age group. When an unusual number of suicides occur in close geographic proximity within a limited amount of time, it creates what is known as a suicide cluster. A prominent cluster impacted two high schools in Palo Alto, California, where five students took their own lives during the 2009–2010 school year and four more did so in 2014–2015. These incidents raised the ten-year suicide rate at the two schools to approximately five times the national average. Interviews with students in the affluent community showed that along with the advantages and opportunities associated with their upbringing, many felt tremendous pressure to succeed. They also reported basing their self-worth on their level of achievement, leading to high levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. Research suggests that social media has increased the suicide contagion effect. Whereas the impact of suicide was once limited to close friends and family members of the victim, online social networks can now extend the impact to those outside the victim’s own community. In September 2019, Facebook announced that it would be hiring a safety policy manager to lead engagement with experts and organizations on topics related to well-being, including suicide among young people. It also noted that it would be banning “graphic cutting images” on the platform. Earlier the same year, the media-sharing app Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, stated that it would start blurring graphic images of self-harm and adding warnings to such posts. In 2018 the Ohio Department of Health and the Stark County Health Department requested assistance from the CDC in examining the factors that led to a cluster of suicides by middle and high school students during a seven-month period. Twelve students in Stark County died by suicide during this period, a rate of twenty deaths per 100,000 people for youths ages ten to nineteen. The agency found that 23 percent of the youths interviewed in the community had an elevated risk of suicide and recommended continued monitoring and interventions to prevent more suicides from occurring. It further suggested that the county implement measures to address the particular risk factors faced by some of the youths in Stark County, including loss of a family member to suicide, opioid abuse, and three or more adverse childhood experiences. The report stressed the importance of all schools having a crisis response plan in place, as students across Ohio were connected through social media and at risk of being affected by the suicides regardless of geographic location. MEDIA DEPICTIONS OF TEEN SUICIDE Some instances of suicide contagion have been attributed to sensational newspaper and television coverage of celebrity suicides that inspire “copycat” behavior. Concerns about suicide contagion have also focused on fictional depictions of suicide, from Shakespeare’s tragic love story Romeo and Juliet to the Academy Award-winning 1989 film Dead Poets Society. Although a clear link between fictional portrayals of suicide and real-life suicidal behavior has not been established, mental health experts worry that certain types of messages may inspire copycat suicides. The first season of the Netflix television series 13 Reasons Why (2017), for example, concerned a high school student who died by suicide, leaving behind thirteen audiotapes intended for the people she considered responsible for her death. The list of people included classmates who had betrayed, bullied, or assaulted her. Some reviewers praised the series, which was adapted from Jay Asher’s 2007 young adult novel by the same name, as a gripping, sensitive account of the struggles faced by American teenagers and claimed that it could serve as an educational tool to generate discussion about teen suicide. Many parents, educators, and suicide prevention advocates, however, criticized the series for presenting suicide as a legitimate solution to problems and a way to exact revenge for past wrongs. Mental health professionals and school counselors warned teens who had experienced suicidal ideation to avoid watching 13 Reasons Why especially the first season finale featuring a graphic depiction of the main character’s suicide. In response to such concerns, Netflix added content warnings to several episodes and produced an accompanying documentary and website to answer questions about the program and refer vulnerable viewers to suicide prevention resources. Before the premiere of the series’ third season in 2019, Netflix announced that it had removed the suicide scene from the first season. In its statement, the company cited advice from medical experts as its reason for editing the episode. Experts suggest that steps can be taken to minimize the chances that a media depiction of suicide will lead to copycat suicide attempts. These measures include providing concise, factual information about suicide, downplaying the method of suicide used, and not presenting suicide as an easy solution or escape. Finally, they recommend that all media coverage of suicide emphasize the importance of staying mentally healthy and provide a list of prevention hotlines or emergency contacts for people at risk. “Teen Suicide.” Gale Opposing Viewpoints Online Collection, Gale, 2019. Gale In Context: Opposing Viewpoints, link.gale.com/apps/doc/PC3010999307/OVIC?u=mcc_mesaLanguage and Bias

HCIS 420 UOPX Integrated Delivery Systems to Improve Healthcare Delivery Discussion

online assignment help HCIS 420 UOPX Integrated Delivery Systems to Improve Healthcare Delivery Discussion.

Assignment ContentImagine you are selected for an internship with the chief information officer (CIO) of a prestigious health care organization. In your first meeting with the CIO, she asks for your help preparing a presentation she is giving to the board.The organization is considering expanding into an integrated health care delivery system and wants the CIO to present on the differences in IT organizational and functional needs for a teaching hospital, a radiology outpatient clinic, and a home health care agency that will become part of the integrated delivery system. Write at least a 1,050-word paper using Microsoft® Word that discusses the differences in IT organizational and functional needs for the integrated delivery system. Consider the following questions as you write the paper:
Discuss whether each type of organization will need a dedicated IT operations department. Consider the following departments:Desktop services departmentNetwork operations departmentApplication programming departmentInterface development departmentHelp DeskDiscuss the possibility of combining some of the departments to serve all of the entities.Identify which of the functions are best onsite at each facility.Identify which IT organizational and functional needs are most efficiently delivered on a consolidated basis.Describe the risks and benefits associated with each alternative consolidated IT organizational and functional need.Cite at least 3 reputable references. One reference must be your textbook, Managing Risk in Information Systems. Reputable references include trade or industry publications, government or agency websites, scholarly works, or other sources of similar quality. Format your assignment according to APA guidelines.
HCIS 420 UOPX Integrated Delivery Systems to Improve Healthcare Delivery Discussion

Henry Ford College Employee Reactions to Security Changes Analysis

Henry Ford College Employee Reactions to Security Changes Analysis.

Employees are often the greatest security threat to an organization. It may be a disgruntled employee who felt he or she was poorly treated or a model employee who simply didn’t follow company policy for keeping his or her computer secure.The case study about coordination between the IT and HR Departments from your textbook in this unit’s Learning Resources covers this type of security threat. This case involves a mid-size company with a sophisticated information infrastructure. The director of IT is new, and the head of human resources has been with the organization for some time. As the new IT director begins implementing additional security measures, a security breach occurs.For this Assignment, you will analyze the above case study from this unit’s reading and consider employee behavior, preparation for and prevention of security breaches, and appropriate communication with employees after attacks.By Day 7Submit a 2- to 4-page analysis in APA format of the case study. In your analysis, answer the following:What about employee awareness and/or mindset may have led to the breach?What steps might management have taken to prepare for or prevent this breach?Based on your understanding about the attacker and the work environment, how might the company ward off future attacks?What information might the company communicate to its employees about the attack?
Henry Ford College Employee Reactions to Security Changes Analysis

Outline (8-10) Intro (1-2 pages): Intro to topic and ideas; road map Clear research question Overview of answer So Essay

Outline (8-10) Intro (1-2 pages): Intro to topic and ideas; road map Clear research question Overview of answer So what, why’s it important? Literature review (annotated bibliography) summerize existing lit Methods: Sample Research methods What interview involved Recruitment How analyzed Why you chose the method you did, why best for your question Results/Findings: Overview of findings Discussion/Conclusion: Overview of what you found How unique/what hole is filled Limitations Future research