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MGT 404 SEU Individual Job Design to Congruent with Larger Organization Design Ques

MGT 404 SEU Individual Job Design to Congruent with Larger Organization Design Ques.

The Assignment must be submitted on Blackboard (WORD format only) via allocated folder.Assignments submitted through email will not be accepted.Students are advised to make their work clear and well presented; marks may be reduced for poor presentation. This includes filling your information on the cover page.Students must mention question number clearly in their answer.Late submission will NOT be accepted.Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from students or other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks. No exceptions. All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism). Submissions without this cover page will NOT be accepted.
MGT 404 SEU Individual Job Design to Congruent with Larger Organization Design Ques

George Washington University Contract Law & Coppell Promotions Case Study

George Washington University Contract Law & Coppell Promotions Case Study.

Assignment: Find and read the Michael Bolton case, Michael Coppell Promotions vs. Bolton re: an Australian tour. Kim Basinger initially agreed to star in the motion picture, “Boxing Helena” only to pull out later. Find and read Main Line vs. Basinger. Find the provisions of the California 7 Year Rule for Personal Services Contracts. Briefly explain these provisions. Find at least two cases that have been filed where an artist has tried to void an agreement based upon the seven-year limit? Briefly explain what happened. Olivia De Havilland, who recently died at 102, famous for her role in Gone With The Wind, was the first artist to use this provision to void an entertainment agreement. Find her case and briefly explain what happened. California also has a special provision regarding injunctive relief – e.g. where a record label tries to get an injunction to prevent an artist from recording for another label. The main case was brought by Motown against Teena Marie in the 1980’s: Teena Marie.Assignment: find an article that is critical of 360 deals. Also, research what they are. Can you find an article that discusses when a contract is unconscionable? Read Holmes v. Smith (an interesting case re: the Fresh Prince here. Be prepared to discuss or ask questions of the student team presenting. It contains some interesting contract issues including the ability of minors to contract. We will also examine the problem of contracting with minors – who are frequently the subject of entertainment industry contracts: see http://wallacecollins.com/minors.html. Wallace is a practitioner in New York.Assignment: Find out what provisions are made for minors in film productions in New York and California. Are they essentially the same or are their differences? Please explain them briefly.
George Washington University Contract Law & Coppell Promotions Case Study

Ethnography: Media, Technology, Social Movements Essay (Critical Writing)

essay help online This work discusses various aspects of ethnography. Notably, it looks at the relationship between fashion and culture, body modification and identity, and the influence of contemporary media on message delivery. The paper goes further to discuss the influence of mobile phones on ethnographic blending and the impact of social movement on social transformation. Many people consider fashion as a means of demonstrating ethnonationalism. Persons belonging to different nations and cultures are always thought to dress in ways that make it easy for other people to identify them. Someone may wonder why the background affects the dress code. Arkin responds to this dilemma by insisting that people dress in a particular manner as a way of showing their love for their nation or community (723). However, national fashions cause prejudices between people of different origins or even of the same origin. Why should there be prejudices? Prejudices arise due to national hegemony: citizens of some nations feel superior to those from other nations. Some people also feel offended whenever their countrymen “betray” their national fashion. Apart from fashion and ethnonationalism, many people in the US have embraced a culture of tattooing and piercing their bodies as a way of identifying with modernism. This culture gives many of them a sense of fulfillment. One may wonder whether this trend only affects certain social groups. On the contrary, this culture transgresses every social boundary (Sweetman 173). What aspect of tattooing and piercing do individuals like? According to Sweetman, individuals who tattoo or pierce their bodies are not interested in a single part of the process. Their interest is in the entire process (168). The pain they go through during the tattooing and piercing processes is very significant to them just as the finished product. The other ethnographic practice worth studying is the switching and preference of media during breakups. It is, usually, very difficult to communicate and understand breakup messages. This situation has worsened in modern times. Why is it difficult to communicate and understand breakup messages? Gershon answers this question by arguing that people understand certain messages when specific media are used for communicating the messages (390). Such people fail to understand the same messages when senders use different types of media. If this is the case, why is the situation more complicated in modern days than it was in the past? The reason for the complication in the communication of breakup messages today is an increase in the number of media. In the past, people never had the opportunity to love some media more than others. On the other hand, people may have or lack mutual intelligibility depending on their media preferences today. Therefore, break up messages end up being disregarded for using media that the recipients do not prefer. It is also worth noting that modern technologies, such as mobile phones, also have ethnographic values for different groups of people. Many people may wonder how this could be possible. Mobile phones are products of modernism, which makes many people view them as agents of ethnographic destruction. On the contrary, mobile phones serve as a means of demonstrating loyalty to people’s cultures while at the same time demonstrating adoption to modernity. In other words, mobile phones can help blend tradition and modernism. McIntosh describes this situation using Giriama text messages, which use code-switching, English short forms, and vernacular in demonstrating the blending of tradition and modernity (McIntosh 341). Having already stated that modern media have been increasing in number as time passes, one may wonder whether ancient ways of communication such as social movements are still useful. However, looking at recent occurrences in the world reveals that demonstrations are still valid. A suitable example of instances when demonstrations have been successful is the Occupy Wall Street protest. Citizens complained about corruption, economic inequality, and greed among bankers (Krugman par. 6). They prolonged it until the media gave them attention. This paper has discussed fashion, tattooing and piercing, technology, social movements, and their ethnographic influences. All of them have profound impacts on society. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More Works Cited Arkin, Kimberly. “Rhinestone Aesthetics and Religious Essence: Looking Jewish in Paris.” American Ethnologist 36.4 (2009): 722-734. Print. Gershon, Illana. “Breaking up is Hard to Do: Media Switching and Media Ideologies.” Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 20.2 (2010): 389-405. Print. Krugman, Paul. “Confronting Malefactors.” New York Times 6 Oct. 2011: n. pag. Print. McIntosh, Janet. “Mobile Phones and Mipoho’s Prophecy: The Powers and Dangers of Flying Language.” American Ethnologist 37.2 (2010): 337-353. Print. Sweetman, Paul. “Only Skin Deep? Tattooing, Piercing and the Transgressive Body.” The Body’s Perilous Pleasures: Dangerous Desires and Contemporary Culture. Ed. Michael Aaron. Edinburg: Edinburg University Press, 1999. 165-183. Print.

College of Central Florida Nurse Burnout Integrative Evidence Based Paper

College of Central Florida Nurse Burnout Integrative Evidence Based Paper.

I’m working on a nursing question and need support to help me study.

Using the two approved research articles for the topic you selected (Nurse Burnout), address the following content for each article:What is the problem? What is your PICOT question?Why is this problem important nursing?Summarize the main points of the research articles. Include type of research (qualitative/quantitative), research design, collection of data, methods, and significant findingsAre the studies rigorous? Explain strengths and weakness. For Quantitative Research you must use the appropriate terminology: What makes this research Valid, Reliable, Generalizable. For Qualitative you must use the appropriate terminology: What makes this research, Trustworthy- Credible, Transferable, Dependable, and Confirmable.Compare/contrast the findings of each study in your summary.Could these studies help to make a practice change for nurses? Explain why.Paper must be 3-4 pages written in APA format. Include your references. The reference page and title page are not to be included in the total number of pages.
College of Central Florida Nurse Burnout Integrative Evidence Based Paper

Ashworth College Wk 5 Urine Color & Patient Hydration Status Lab Report

Ashworth College Wk 5 Urine Color & Patient Hydration Status Lab Report.

Week 5 Lab Exercise (Introduction)IntroductionThe organs, tubes, muscles, and nerves that work together to create, store, and carry urine are the urinary system. The primary function of the urinary system is to maintain the volume and composition of body fluids. Maintenance of body fluid volume, which includes blood volume, relates directly to the control of blood pressure. Disorders involving the urinary system, and more specifically the kidneys, can affect blood pressure, red blood cell production and activation of vitamin D.Normal cell metabolism leads to the accumulation of waste products such as carbon dioxide and nitrogenous wastes (ammonia, urea, etc.) throughout the body. The urinary system helps to remove these byproducts from the body in order for normal function to continue. Because of this role, the urinary system is often referred to as the excretory system.The urinary system maintains the appropriate fluid volume in the body by regulating the amount of water that is excreted in urine. In doing so, the concentrations of various electrolytes and normal pH of the blood are also controlled. The major organs of the urinary system are the kidneys (2), ureters (2), urinary bladder, sphincter muscles (2), and the urethra (Figure 1). Together, these components of the urinary system maintain the fluid homeostasis of the body.Figure 1: The urinary system consists of paired kidneys and ureters, a urinary bladder, sphincter muscles and a urethra.The urinary system can be subdivided into two functional groups: kidneys and the excretory passage. The kidney is the site of urine manufacture. Urine contains the waste products eliminated from the bloodstream by the filtration processes that occur within these organs. The ureter, bladder, and urethra are structures for collecting urine and transporting it from the body.The KidneysThe kidneys are bean-shaped, crimson colored organs in the abdomen, retroperitoneal to the organs of digestions and around or just below the ribcage. The left kidney lies slightly superior to the right kidney (which sits posterior and inferior to the liver), and is also slightly longer. Each kidney in the human body is roughly the size of a fist, measuring 10 – 12 cm in length, 5 – 7 cm wide, and 2 – 5 cm thick. The blood supply, nerves and lymphatic vessels enter and exit at the hilum (the indented medial region). Each kidney is surrounded by the renal capsule, a layer of collagen fibers that covers the outer surface of the organ, and peri-nephratic fat which stabilizes the organ. Adrenal glands cap the kidneys on the superior pole.The Cortex and the MedullaThe kidney itself is constructed of two layers. The cortex is the outer layer and the medulla is the inner layer (Figure 2). The superficial cortex is lighter in color compared to the medulla. Within the medulla are a number of conical structures called the medullary pyramids. The base of these triangular regions faces toward the cortex while the papilla (apex) points inward. Renal columns segregate the pyramids.Each pyramid of medullary tissue and the cortical tissue immediately above it is defined as a kidney lobe. Medial to the hilum, the renal pelvis forms a basin-like structure with radial projections, called major calyces which are further subdivided into the minor calyces, penetrate the medulla. This duct system collects urine from the pyramids and drains the fluid into the ureters.The main role of the kidneys is to filter water-soluble waste products, which result from bodily functions, from the blood. Thus, each kidney is able to control the flux of ions out of the body and conserve (or eliminate) water. The abdominal aorta supplies the renal arteries with blood, which enters at the hilum of each kidney. Approximately 1.25 liters of blood are delivered to the kidneys for purification every minute. In fact, nearly a quarter of the body’s total blood flow is directed to the kidneys at any given time. The composition of blood is adjusted by glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion. Urine is concentrated as the kidney excretes and reabsorbs water, electrolytes, amino acids, glucose, and other small molecules under the influence of local and systemic hormones. Furthermore, the kidneys remove urea from the blood, which is a nitrogenous waste resulting from the metabolism of amino acids. The filtrate emerges from the glomerular capsule, and travels through the highly coiled and twisted tubules before reaching the nephron loop. The nephron loop resembles the shape of a hairpin loop, and is comprised of a section of tubules in the kidney called the loop of Henle. The filtrate then travels through more coiled and twisted loops before exiting through a collection duct. The product of this process is urine, which is stored in the bladder before being excreted from the body.Figure 2: Blood flow through a kidney (black). Kidney structures (green).NephronsThe smallest functional unit of the kidney is the nephron. Each kidney contains approximately one million nephrons, all acting together to facilitate filtration. Nephrons consist of a renal corpuscle and a tubule system (Figure 3). The renal corpuscle includes the glomerular capsule, specifically the Bowman’s capsule, surrounded by a tight twisted knot of capillaries called the glomerulus. The Bowman’s capsule is lined on the inside by visceral epithelial cells called podocytes. These cells have long processes that cling to the capillary walls to establish size selectivity and offer a huge surface area for exchange between the blood vessel and nephron. Most nephrons are located within the cortex, and are thus named cortical nephrons. However, others called juxtamedullary nephrons, are positioned partially in the medulla. These nephrons have additional capillaries called the vasa recta that facilitate both reabsorption and secretion.The tubule system of the nephron (Figure 3) carries plasma filtrate from the glomerular capsule to a collection duct, and is the site of reabsorption and secretion. The tubular structure is lined by a single layer of simple, squamous cells and surrounded by peritubular capillaries. These lining cells facilitate the reabsorption of water and small molecules from the filtrate into the blood (through the capillaries), and the secretion of wastes from the blood into the urine (the filtrate). This is the only place in the body where a capillary network is both supplied (afferent artery) and drained by (efferent artery) an artery. These high-resistance vessels facilitate the filtration process. The diameter of both arteries is regulated in order to control the blood hydrostatic pressure in the glomerular capillaries, thus adjusting the filtration rate within the kidneys.Figure 3: Kidney anatomy.Depending on what substances are needed by the body to maintain proper pH and electrolyte concentration, the reabsorption of filtrate components will vary. Water is reabsorbed by osmosis, but most substances depend on active transport to select what will re-enter the bloodstream.The highly vascularized renal cortex and the pyramids together make up the parenchyma. The medullary pyramids appear striated, due to the parallel alignment of the loops of Henle and collecting tubules. Collecting tubules are not considered part of the nephron as they are the duct system of the kidney. The bulk of the medullary pyramid is composed of collecting tubules. The collecting tubules are lined with simple cuboidal epithelium. They meet at the apex, merging together to form large ducts, called the ducts of Bellini, which empty into the renal pelvis. From here, the filtrate exits the kidney through the ureter and is collected in the bladder awaiting urination.Figure 4: Basic steps in urine formation.The UrethraThe urethra is the final passageway for urine before it exits the body. This thin-walled tube is composed of smooth muscle, connective tissue, and is lined with a mucous membrane. In females, the urethra is short (approximately three to four cm) and runs a straight, direct route from the neck of the bladder to the vulva to exit the body. In males, the urethra is much longer (approximately 20 cm) and curves through the prostate gland and the penis before exiting the body. The short length of the female urethra makes it more prone to infection than the male urethra. The male urethra also transports semen from the reproductive organs to the outside of the body.The UretersThe ureters are muscular tubules that link the kidneys to the bladder (Figure 5). They measure about 30 cm in length and 3 mm in diameter. This tubule is composed of an outer layer of fibrous connective tissue (adventitia), a middle layer of smooth muscle cells, and an inner layer of epithelium (mucosa). There are slight differences in the ureters of males and females to accommodate reproductive organs. Peristaltic action is used to transport urine from the kidneys to the bladder.Figure 5: The ureters descend from each kidney and transport the urine to the bladder.The Urinary Bladder The urinary bladder is composed of bands of three layers of interlaced smooth muscle, collectively called the detrusor muscle (Figure 6). Emptying the bladder, also called micturition, is controlled by the internal urethral sphincter and the external urethral sphincter. Stretch receptors in the bladder wall transmit signals to the CNS when the bladder reaches a volume of roughly 200 mL. In response, the PNS produces reflex contractions in the bladder. Bladder contractions force the liquid past the involuntary internal sphincter muscle into the superior part of the urethra. At this point, an individual feels the need to urinate. The bladder is emptied when the voluntary external sphincter muscles are relaxed.Figure 6: The urinary bladder is a muscle that stores urine until it is excreted from the body.WEEK 5 ASSIGNMENT: URINALYSISSubmission InstructionsPlease complete your answers to the lab questions on this form. Please complete your answers, and SAVE the file in a location which you will be able to find again. Then, attach and submit the completed form to the Week 5Laboratory dropbox in the Ashford University classroom. Result TablesTable 1: Normal and Abnormal Urinalysis ResultsTestNormal ResultsAbnormal Results and Symptoms/Possible DiagnosispH4.5 – 7.5Below 4.5: Acidic Urine; diabetes, starvation, dehydration, respiratory acidosis, kidney or urinary tract disorder.Above 7.5: Alkaline urine; kidney disease, kidney failure, urinary tract infection, respiratory alkalosis. GlucoseNoneRed or Green Color: Glucose present; diabetes mellitus. ProteinNoneViolet Color: Protein present; kidney disease.YeastNoneEffervescence: Yeast present; yeast infection in urinary tract.KetonesLittle or NoneHigh Concentrations of Ketones Present: Starvation, prolonged vomiting, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or other metabolic disorders.Table 2: Todd’s ResultsTestResultsDiagnosis:pH4.0GlucoseGlucose PresentProteinNoneYeastNoneKetonesNone Table 3: Sharon’s ResultsTestResultsDiagnosis:pH3.0GlucoseGlucose PresentProteinNoneYeastNoneKetonesKetones Present Table 4: Helen’s ResultsTestResultsDiagnosis:pH8.0GlucoseNoneProteinYesYeastNoneKetonesKetones PresentTable 5: Simon’s ResultsTestResultsDiagnosis:pH6.5GlucoseNoneProteinNoneYeastYesKetonesNonePost-Lab Questions1. How can a patient’s hydration status be measured by urine color?2. Research ketonuria. What is this disease? How does it occur, and can it be treated?3. Why doesn’t healthy urine contain any glucose? 4. When are ketones produced? Why might this lead to a diagnosis of starvation or fasting?5. What does a red or smoky brown urine color indicate?
Ashworth College Wk 5 Urine Color & Patient Hydration Status Lab Report