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Languages homework help. BA3320 Research Select any 3 best performance and 3 worst performance counties from Table 3.5 Doing Business in Various Countries. Use as reference the Fig. 3.2 the Political Spectrum,BA3320 Research Select any 3 best performance and 3 worst,Firstly, Select any 3 best performance and 3 worst performance counties from Table 3.5 Doing Business in Various Countries.,Secondly, Use as reference the Fig. 3.2 the, Political Spectrum,.,Thirdly, Refer to section looking to the Future in Chapter 2, Scenarios on the Evolvement on Nations Culture.,Fourthly, Work an Excel chart with the following columns and fill the date reviewing these chapters 2 and 3.,Cite all References and Sources of information used,firstly, Columns for Countries Comparative Chart,Secondly, Country,Thirdly, Continent located,Fourthly, Population,Also, Gross National Product (GNP),Furthermore, Inflation,Moreover, Specific Political System and Risk,Type Legal System,Major Religion,Scenario (from the Culture Scenarios section) select which Scenario may describe better the countries selected, In a 1-page essay describe your opinion on this.,What is the spectrum of political ideologies?,Political ideologies in the United States refers to the various ideologies and ideological demographics in the United States. Citizens in the United States generally classify themselves as adherent to positions along the political spectrum as either liberal, progressive, moderate, or conservative.,What are the sides of the political spectrum?,Political parties in the political spectrum,Beyme was able to arrange seven of them from left to right: communist, socialist, green, liberal, Christian democratic, conservative and right-wing extremist.,Does globalization affect culture?,Globalization does not take into consideration cultural and socioeconomic circumstances. Instead, it looks to further the interests of the larger, more influential countries and corporations which are the impetus behind its spread.,What is an example of cultural globalization?,Examples of Cultural Globalization,Business leaders from around the world gather in China, Japan, the U.S., and the U.K. to exchange ideas about the direction of their particular field, business culture, and technology. Cultures around the world have also exchanged words or phrases.Languages homework help
Architecture as a Strategy for Crime Control. Urban Densification: Is it really the solution for sustainable cities? Architecture: The Tool for Crime Control Figure 1.” The design of buildings and the arrangement of streets, public spaces and green areas might reduce crime rates” – The Parque Explora, Medellin, Colombia (American Society of Landscape Architects 2014). The worldwide concern about population growth and rapid urbanisation in many cities around the world has brought with it many social problems affecting sustainability and quality of life. Among the most serious social problems are crime and segregation. There is no doubt that crime and segregation are influenced by a multiplicity of factors such as economic, social, and governmental as well as physical elements (Marzbali et al. 2011). This disorderly expansion and informal settlements are generating “empty” spaces in the cities, creating a rupture in the urban fabric. Physical elements such as Rivers, railways, freeways even buildings are contributing to this rupture creating “Social-Urban Barriers” in cities. Katyal (2002) states that Governments need to pay special attention to the built environment towards the reduction of crime and social segregation. The design of buildings and the arrangement of streets, public spaces and green areas can affect the opportunity of crime (Soomeren 2008). The prevention of crime through environmental design or through urban planning and architectural design accompanied by community’s participation has proven to be a useful, effective, and feasible strategy to prevent crime and the sense of insecurity in cities (Marzbali et al. 2011). Countries throughout the world, such as Basil, Colombia, Australia, Japan, and Great Britain have used architectural design techniques to prevent crime. For example, the 2000 Sydney Olympics games, cleverly employed architecture to reduce crime by linking the new facilities with the existing neighbourhood (footpaths and streets), increasing street lighting in footpaths, modifying landscapes and creating visibility around stadiums (Katyal 2002). Therefore, this helped to increase profits, reduce incidents, and improvement on accessibility and enjoyment of the events. Figure 2. Sydney Olympic Park Railway Station – Architects cleverly modified landscapes and created visibility around facilities (Skyscraperscity.com 2006). A large number of experiments have shown that the number of certain types of crime can be reduced by modifying the opportunity to commit a crime in the built environment without having to move the place where the crime takes place (Marzbali et al. 2011). One of the most well-known and used methodologies for crime prevention around the world is the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED). The CPTED approach starts from the premise that, in certain spaces, crimes are the result of the opportunities offered by the same physical environment (The State of Queensland 2007). This provides the basis for proposing that in order to reduce the likelihood of crimes, it is necessary to alter the physical environment. The strategies employed in this approach are (1) passive or natural surveillance; (2) natural access control; (3) territorial reinforcement and (4) maintenance (Katyal 2002). In addition, Katyal (2002) explains that the design should create opportunities for natural surveillance by residents, neighbours and visitors and instil a sense of territoriality so that residents to develop proprietary attitudes and outsiders feel deterred from entering a private space. So, the goal is to build communities and avoid social segregation. A good example of the prevention of crime through environmental design or through urban planning and architecture has been taken place in Medellín, Colombia, the former “The world’s most violent city”, which, by providing quality public transport to marginalized areas (Metrocable), improvement of public space, creation of library parks (active all day), accompanied by other policies to promote vitality in the community (such as the creation of businesses), gave rise to the recovery of a marginal neighbourhood and the reduction of crime (Medina 2014). Figure 3. ” As part of an extensive urban integration project in a huge informal settlement in Medellín, Colombia, the recently-constructed system of escalators with public squares and balconies addresses serious problems regarding connectivity, security and coexist” (Jordana 2013). Undoubtedly interventions of the built environment allow preventing crime by fostering life on the streets and building communities, as well as improving social sustainability in cities. Architects, Urban Planners and others design professionals should take into consideration the surrounding environment in order to reduce crime rates. This intervention also requires among others, a properly functioning police force and criminal justice systems along with a model of economic development that creates viable opportunities to escape poverty and reduce social inequality. References Jordana, Sebastian. 2013. “Awards Competition Boosts Momentum of Sustainable Construction.” http://www.archdaily.com/436890/awards-competition-boosts-momentum-of-sustainable-construction, accessed 27-03-2017. Katyal, Neal Kumar 2002. “Architecture as Crime Control.” The Yale Law Journal 111 (1039):1039-1139. Marzbali, Massoomeh Hedayati, Aldrin Abdullah, Nordin Abd Razak, and Mohammad Javad Maghsoodi Tilaki. 2011. “A Review of the Effectiveness of Crime Prevention by Design Approaches towards Sustainable Development.” Journal of Sustainable Development 4 (1). doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jsd.v4n1p160 Medina, Salvador. 2014. “La ciudad como estrategia preventiva contra el crimen [The city as a preventive strategy against crime.].” http://labrujula.nexos.com.mx/?p=115, accessed 23-03-2017. Skyscraperscity.com. 2006. “Sydney Olimpic Park.” http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=460665, accessed 27-03-2017. Soomeren, Paul Van. 2008. “Prevención de la delincuencia mediante el diseño ambiental y mediante el espacio urbano y arquitectónico [Prevention of crime through environmental design and urban and architectural space].” Fundación Democracia y Gobierno Local y Diputació de Barcelona:273-306. The State of Queensland. 2007. “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design.” Guidelines for Queensland 1. Jordana, Sebastian. 2013. “Awards Competition Boosts Momentum of Sustainable Construction.” http://www.archdaily.com/436890/awards-competition-boosts-momentum-of-sustainable-construction, accessed 27-03-2017. Katyal, Neal Kumar 2002. “Architecture as Crime Control.” The Yale Law Journal 111 (1039):1039-1139. Marzbali, Massoomeh Hedayati, Aldrin Abdullah, Nordin Abd Razak, and Mohammad Javad Maghsoodi Tilaki. 2011. “A Review of the Effectiveness of Crime Prevention by Design Approaches towards Sustainable Development.” Journal of Sustainable Development 4 (1). doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jsd.v4n1p160 Medina, Salvador. 2014. “La ciudad como estrategia preventiva contra el crimen [The city as a preventive strategy against crime.].” http://labrujula.nexos.com.mx/?p=115, accessed 23-03-2017. Soomeren, Paul Van. 2008. “Prevención de la delincuencia mediante el diseño ambiental y mediante el espacio urbano y arquitectónico [Prevention of crime through environmental design and urban and architectural space].” Fundación Democracia y Gobierno Local y Diputació de Barcelona:273-306. The State of Queensland. 2007. “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design.” Guidelines for Queensland 1. American Society of Landscape Architects. 2014. “Medellin’s Social Innovation.” https://dirt.asla.org/2014/04/10/medellins-amazing-transformation/, accessed 27-03-2017. Jordana, Sebastian. 2013. “Awards Competition Boosts Momentum of Sustainable Construction.” http://www.archdaily.com/436890/awards-competition-boosts-momentum-of-sustainable-construction, accessed 27-03-2017. Katyal, Neal Kumar 2002. “Architecture as Crime Control.” The Yale Law Journal 111 (1039):1039-1139. Marzbali, Massoomeh Hedayati, Aldrin Abdullah, Nordin Abd Razak, and Mohammad Javad Maghsoodi Tilaki. 2011. “A Review of the Effectiveness of Crime Prevention by Design Approaches towards Sustainable Development.” Journal of Sustainable Development 4 (1). doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jsd.v4n1p160 Medina, Salvador. 2014. “La ciudad como estrategia preventiva contra el crimen [The city as a preventive strategy against crime.].” http://labrujula.nexos.com.mx/?p=115, accessed 23-03-2017. Soomeren, Paul Van. 2008. “Prevención de la delincuencia mediante el diseño ambiental y mediante el espacio urbano y arquitectónico [Prevention of crime through environmental design and urban and architectural space].” Fundación Democracia y Gobierno Local y Diputació de Barcelona:273-306. The State of Queensland. 2007. “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design.” Guidelines for Queensland 1. Katyal, Neal Kumar 2002. “Architecture as Crime Control.” The Yale Law Journal 111 (1039):1039-1139. Marzbali, Massoomeh Hedayati, Aldrin Abdullah, Nordin Abd Razak, and Mohammad Javad Maghsoodi Tilaki. 2011. “A Review of the Effectiveness of Crime Prevention by Design Approaches towards Sustainable Development.” Journal of Sustainable Development 4 (1). doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jsd.v4n1p160 Medina, Salvador. 2014. “La ciudad como estrategia preventiva contra el crimen [The city as a preventive strategy against crime.].” http://labrujula.nexos.com.mx/?p=115, accessed 23-03-2017. Netherlands Architecture Institute. 2013. “Parque Explora.” http://en.nai.nl/platform/innovation_agenda/item/_pid/kolom2-1/_rp_kolom2-1_elementId/1_1042577, accessed 27-03-2017. Soomeren, Paul Van. 2008. “Prevención de la delincuencia mediante el diseño ambiental y mediante el espacio urbano y arquitectónico [Prevention of crime through environmental design and urban and architectural space].” Fundación Democracia y Gobierno Local y Diputació de Barcelona:273-306. The State of Queensland. 2007. “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design.” Guidelines for Queensland 1. Katyal, Neal Kumar 2002. “Architecture as Crime Control.” The Yale Law Journal 111 (1039):1039-1139. Marzbali, Massoomeh Hedayati, Aldrin Abdullah, Nordin Abd Razak, and Mohammad Javad Maghsoodi Tilaki. 2011. “A Review of the Effectiveness of Crime Prevention by Design Approaches towards Sustainable Development.” Journal of Sustainable Development 4 (1). doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/jsd.v4n1p160 Medina, Salvador. 2014. “La ciudad como estrategia preventiva contra el crimen [The city as a preventive strategy against crime.].” http://labrujula.nexos.com.mx/?p=115, accessed 23-03-2017. Soomeren, Paul Van. 2008. “Prevención de la delincuencia mediante el diseño ambiental y mediante el espacio urbano y arquitectónico [Prevention of crime through environmental design and urban and architectural space].” Fundación Democracia y Gobierno Local y Diputació de Barcelona:273-306. The State of Queensland. 2007. “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design.” Guidelines for Queensland 1. Architecture as a Strategy for Crime Control
Children And Families. According to Butler and Roberts (2004), there is a vast contrast in the shape and size of families in Britain today, with a significant increase in the number of people living alone; in same sex relationships; the number of divorces; single parent families; and Black and Ethnic Minority families (Boylan and Allan, 2008). This paper will seek to explain the impact that social work practice can have on marginalized families and moreover, Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) children and families. Families who are in receipt of social work services may feel stigmatized by the visits of a social worker, far less than that of a health visitor and parents whose children have disabilities for example, may be offended by their inclusion on a register looked after by social services; and may also feel they are in receipt of ‘charity’ if such services are provided on a voluntary basis (Butler and Roberts, 2004). Aldgate and Statham (2001:73) found that parents value recognition of the circumstances surrounding their difficulties and the importance of respect for their different approaches to parenting and furthermore, that “parents respond well to being treated with dignity.” Butler and Roberts (2004:137) maintain that these values are “…what is needed to do the job, assuming that the job is one of helping families resolve their difficulties.” Banks (2006) emphasizes that every social worker needs to understand that personal and professional values can impact significantly upon children and families, with a need for an ongoing ability to scrutinise their own values (Banks, 2001). It is unlikely that anyone would argue that parenting is not an occupation which is highly skilled and demanding; but considering the best practice to support families who are faced with difficulties is based around ‘partnership approaches’, which have the potential of developing particular relationships best suited to helping families solve their difficulties (Butler and Roberts, 2004). The strength of this method of social work lies at the heart of addressing the power imbalance between social worker and service user (Butler and Roberts, 2004) and as Coit (1978, in Butler and Roberts, 2004: 132) states: “partnership at a local level tends to mask structural inequalities and class antagonisms.” However, as Butler and Roberts point out, to achieve this requires a willingness of the social worker to think differently about their role with families, as they did in the past. Social work practice before the introduction of the Children Act (1989) perceived families as needy and inadequate; it also adopted the concept of ‘dangerously dysfunctional’ families, which researchers in the 1980s became uncertain of the efficacy of that approach (Adams, Dominelli and Payne, 2009). The Children Act (1989) was by far a highly significant development in English law but contains “no magic cure for family problems,” as stated by (Allen, 2008: 1). However, the 1989 Act’s legal framework, according to Adams, et al. (2009) set out clear expectations and principles that underpinned social work practice with children and families that included; the need for children to remain within their family network if possible, in the emergence of difficulties, families are to be supported in doing this; if intervention is to occur, evidence must be produced to support such action is preferable to no formal court order being made. Allen (2008) explains that the object of the 1989 Act is to provide people who care for children the necessary legal tools to further the best interests of those children in their care. The harrowing death of Victoria Climbe and Lord Laming’s (2003) subsequent inquiry prompted the government to introduce the Children Act 2004 and the Every Child Matters (ECM) Green paper, which central features were early intervention and joined up working (Kirton, 2009). However, some writers have argued the effectiveness of (ECM) and described it as a lifeless vision of childhood based on a work ethic of academic achievement and social conformity (Williams, 2004 cited in Kirton, 2009). Despite social work’s best intentions to meet the needs of children and families (Butler and Roberts, 2004), the Department of Health reported that it was continuing to fail comprehensively with BME families. In a study carried out by the Social Services Inspectorate of eight local authorities’ services to BME children and their families found that: most councils did not have strategies in place to deliver appropriate services to ethnic minorities and that families were often offered services that were not appropriate or sensitive to their needs (Department of Health 2000: 1) There are many generations of BME families in Britain who historically have lived with racism and the failure of social work to address the tendency to pathologize them based on “crude racial stereotypes” (Butler and Roberts, 2004: 71). According to the Bernardo’s website (2010), BME families are at a greater risk of experiencing poverty, higher rates of ill health, poor housing and racism. Dominelli (1997: 6) affirms that “racism is fundamental to the process of social exclusion and subordination among ethnic minorities… and flowing from this, their exploitation and oppression.” Dominelli (1997: 22) is clear in her close examination of racism and found that “no aspect of social work is free from it” stemming from White cultural domination in everyday routines. Butler and Roberts (2004) add that BME service users are treated the same as White service users and that a major failure of social work practitioners and planners is their adoption of a ‘colour blind’ approach. Furthermore, it may be the case that some people need to be treated differently in order to take account of experiences of racism and the value of cultural differences and strengths (Butler and Roberts, 2004). Richards and Ince’s (2000) survey of 157 local authorities found some examples of good practice which offer a positive development to build on. Richards and Ince found that some local authorities’ anti-racist practice and culturally sensitive services were kept consistently up to date with further training and team meetings to stay on top of any issues, however, Butler and Roberts (2004) argue that this is rare and see social work as part of the problem and as the first step in making it part of the solution. This paper set about to explain how social work practice might impact on children and families, with a closer focus on Black and Minority Ethnic families. It found evidence of a continued failure within social work to address the needs of BME families who are ethnically and culturally diverse through social work’s colour blind approach. Despite some rare examples of good practice, it could be that indeed social work itself is part of the problem faced by BME families. Children And Families
BA 62070 Campbellsville University Tesla Financial Ratio Analysis Essay.

Compute the following ratios for two years. You may use Excel to compute your ratios.1. Debt ratio2. Gross profit margin3. Free cash flow4. Times interest earned5. Accounts receivable turnover6. Inventory turnoverWrite a 3-6 page report evaluating trends in all of the above ratios. Discuss whether your company’s profitability, efficiency, liquidity, and solvency are improving or deteriorating. Suggest ways the company can improve the ratios that show problems. The report should be well written with a cover page, introduction, the body of the paper (with appropriate subheadings), conclusion, and reference page. References must be appropriately cited. Use APA throughout.Format: Double-spaced, one-inch margins, using a 12-point Times New Roman font.
BA 62070 Campbellsville University Tesla Financial Ratio Analysis Essay

The Role Of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stroke

Share this: Facebook Twitter Reddit LinkedIn WhatsApp INTRODUCTION Stroke is a “rapidly developing clinical signs of focal disturbance of cerebral function, lasting more than 24 hours or leading to death with no apparent cause other than that of vascular origin” (Aho K Harmsen 1980). Stroke is a disease of developed nation and it’s the third leading cause of death and long term disability all over the world with an incidence rate of 10 million per year (Sudlow and Warlow 1996). Stroke occurs at any age but it is more common in elderly between 55 to 85 years of age (Boudewejn Kollen and Gert Kwakkel 2006). Stroke is classified into two types based on the pathology and cause, Ischemic stroke, occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is decreased, leading to dysfunction of the brain tissue in that area. The ischemia results when there is Thrombosis, Embolism, Systemic hypoperfusion and venous thrombosis. Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when there is accumulation of blood anywhere within the skull vault. These hemorrhage results when there is microaneurism, arterio venous malformation and inflammatory vasculitis (Capildeo and Habermann 1977). Normal cerebral blood flow is approximately 50 to 60 ml/100g/ Minutes and varies in different parts of the brain. When there is ischemia, the cerebral auto-regulatory mechanism will compensate for the reduction in the cerebral blood flow by local vasodilatation and increase the extraction of oxygen and glucose from the blood. When the Cerebral Blood Flow is reduced to below 20 ml/100g/min, an electrical silence occurs and synaptic activity is greatly diminished in an attempt to preserve energy stored. Cerebral blood flow of less than 10ml/100g/min results in irreversible neuronal injury. These neuronal injuries occurs when there is formation of microscopic thrombi, these microscopic thrombi are triggered by ischemia induced activation of destructive vasoactive enzymes that are released by endothelium, platelets and neuronal cells. These result in the development of hypoxic ischemic neuronal injury which is primarily induced by overreaction of some neurotransmitters like glutamate and aspirate. Within an hour of hypoxic-ischemic insult there will be ischemiec penumbra where auto- regulation is ineffective. This stage of ischemia is called window of opportunity, where the neurological deficit created by ischemia can be partly or completely reversed. After this stage is a stage of neuronal death, in which the deficit is irreversible (Heros 1994). Functional restrictions resulting from stroke are paralysis of upper limb

Penn State University Research on Family Interventions Essay

custom essay Penn State University Research on Family Interventions Essay.

Question # 1: After reading Chapter 15: Research on Family Intervention discuss three salient points that you learned. (250 Words)For Question # 1 Book is Nichols, M.P. (2020) Essentials of Family Therapy (6th edition) The Merrill Social Work and Human Services.Question # 2: Locate two research studies, one that use a causal comparative approach and one that use a correlational approach. Then respond to the questions 1-5 located on pages 178-179 of Merten’s text.Question # 3: Write a two-page reflection paper on any aspect of this weeks reading, activity or course workThis was the reading assignment for this week, Mertens: Chapter 5: Causal Comparative & Correlational Approaches to research.
Penn State University Research on Family Interventions Essay

Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening” Essay

Kate Chopin’s “The Awakening” Essay. Introduction In the novel “The Awakening” by Kate Chopin, the author depicts Edna as a woman who is unable to hide sexual desires. Moreover, Edna juggles her private life with the life she is expected to lead by the society. According to Baym (2008;10-12), Edna struggles to assert the individual identity of a woman beyond the limits set by the patriarchal society. The novel cannot reconcile the public and the private self because of societal expectations that severely curtail freedom of choice. Edna’s sexual escapades are synonymous with the art experiments, which remains a vital part of her life. The changes articulated in Chopin’s novel elucidate the confusion and lack of reconciliation between the role of Edna as a female artist and her sexual inclination. This conflict culminates in the death of Edna. Discussion Conflict between Public and Private Life The start of “The Awakening” depicts Edna as an epitome of the American ideals of the 19th century. She is a young woman married to an attentive and wealth husband. By the social standards of the 19th century, Edna is leading a perfect life. The social picture of this woman is that of a perfect mother and a happy woman. The marital tag “Mrs. Pontellier,” introduces the reader to the picture formed by Edna’s husband and the society that expects every woman to be respectful. This picture comes with responsibilities that curtail Edna’s freedom. Henceforth, she is referred to as Edna after casting aside the fictional role of the woman to lead a carefree life. Edna has a love for the arts, although her main interest is in accomplishing a woman’s dream. Edna is not fully committed to the societal role of a wife, which is against the expectations of the public. Moreover, she undertakes motherly duties with discontent and constantly asserts her position. She thinks that women have no choices in their private lives. Moreover, they are compelled by the patriarchal society to assume their responsibilities of bearing and rearing children (Baym 15). Edna cares for her children although she cannot match the prowess with which Adele performs her societal duties. Edna’s husband reprimands her for her laxity in taking care of their sick son. Moreover, her response on the issue evokes fury and the husband is on the blink of insanity. The husband does not expect such a response from the wife and rebukes Edna for neglecting children, a feat unheard in a perfect patriarchal society, where the woman is supposed to be submissive and attend to the needs of the husband and the children (Baym 105). Edna’s husband was attentive and loving as any American husband in the 19th century. The century depicts women as objects for the gratification of the men rather than subject determining their free will as would be the wish of Edna. Edna embraces modernity in a peculiar way by failing to settle into the designated societal roles that she deems inappropriate and a form restriction. Edna offers a satirical description of her friend’s predicament as a perfect assimilation into the mother role. To Edna, Adele’s situation depicts colorless existence, which fails to emancipate the possessor from the domain of blind contentment (Baym 257). The Awakening When Edna starts to experiment with art, painting surpasses important activities. Painting sparks Edna’s repressed desires to purpose beyond the societal and public roles given to her. Concisely, she wants her private life to be devoid of any form of interference. This forms the genesis of Edna’s awakening. Edna has realized realizes the position she has in the Universe as a human being. She also recognizes that her relationship with others as an individual is preceded by painting. Edna attempts to decipher the lifestyle led by Adele via painting (Baym 280). Ironically, Edna feels the need to connect with the maternal figure notwithstanding that she is determined to dismiss her maternal role of supporting her children. Her art depicts connotations reserved for the private life, which should not enter into the public domain. She focuses on women in a sensual manner. The desire evokes argument that she has a homosexual-maternal aspect. Edna is oblivious that such private matters are not encouraged in the public but she admits that her art is socially acceptable as it depicts the life of Adele. Edna’s art is disrupted by her romantic ardor. She burns with desire when painting Adele. This desire is homosexual and is opposed in such a society. Edna strips away from restrictive aspects in her life. These aspects are social rules, marriage, and clothing (Baym 145). The Conflict Between Private and Public Life After fuelling sexual desires through exploration of painting, Edna recognizes another life. She is conscious of the lack of satisfaction her domestic and social relationships provide her with. Her friends and the family physician fail to recognize what may be happening to her. The doctor claims that the cause of Edna’s unhappiness is her sexual escapades with men. Despite being inscribed with maternal instincts unavoidable after pregnancy, she cannot subject herself to the life led by Adele. Adele is obsessed with her social and maternal duties and can only get fulfillment after caring for the children. Nevertheless, in the attempt by Edna to forge a different life with different roles, Edna leads a life that is different from that of her friend. Moreover, the desire to create a different role and life for herself, emanates from the struggle against social stereotypes (Baym 487). Edna’s aims at becoming conscious of the full potential she has. Notwithstanding that emotional satisfactions are requisites to a full life, the society in which Edna lives in is marred with chauvinistic tendencies. In the light of this, the women are not expected to be self centered. This simply means that the women cannot focus on their happiness and the first priority is family preservation. Edna voices her dissatisfaction with her husband’s views on Victorian ideals. She views the ideals as a form of oppression because her husband determines her choices. She distances herself from the husband through art. The income from these sales gives her a feeling of independence. On the other hand, this move gives the husband a feeling of threat (Baym 452). As opposed to many respectable women who are shy around a doctor, Edna is comfortable. She does not gesture or glance when touched by the doctor. Edna also shows no emotion when she refuses to attend the wedding of her sister. She insists that her husband should attend the function alone because it reminds her of her own marriage. The refusal to attend the wedding reveals that Edna is determined to distance herself from all possible societal roles. By watching her sister become a subservient wife meant for serving her husband, she cannot think of a worse experience. Edna’s father reminds her of the bad experiences she has had in life. Edna’s father and Margaret’s life are perfect examples of patriarchal forces dominating the life of Edna. As she extends the distance between the husband and her, her art increases in force and reality. Edna goes against the societal norms by moving into a house away from their matrimonial home. She does this thinking that she will evolve from an amateur artist to a professional artist (Baym 278). Conclusion In summary, Edna is a hard working woman torn between leading a public or a private life. She uses Adele as a perfect example of the effects of a patriarchal society on the freedom of a woman. This is because Adele is a loving and caring mother. Moreover, Adele is a model of in the 19th century’s woman. The submissiveness of Adele is a source of concern for Edna who views that the woman should emancipate herself from the societal and familial roles and pursue a free life. Edna has no stand. She admires Adele but ridicules her submissiveness. She cannot be like Adele but she worships and idolizes Adele’s children. Through her awakening, there is a further conflict between her personal choice and the choices determined by the public. Beauty, social, and sexual issues also characterize this awakening. This is a difficult way of trying to bring out the private life of an individual in a patriarchal society. Works Cited Baym, Nina. The Norton Anthology of American Literature: Beginnings to 1865. New York: W W NortonKate Chopin’s “The Awakening” Essay

Relationship Between Social Factors and Health Inequalities

Share this: Facebook Twitter Reddit LinkedIn WhatsApp Critically discuss the relationship between social factors and health inequalities. Making reference to at least two theoretical approaches to explaining health inequalities, suggest how useful they are, as well as addressing their weaknesses. Understanding the inequalities in health and their association with various social issues/factors is the objective of this essay. The essay also seeks to explain these underlying health inequalities with social factors using different theoretical methodologies. But, before discussing the correlation between the various social factors and health inequalities we need to comprehend ourselves with the significance of Health. As per the World Health Organization (WHO): “ Health is a state of complete physical, social and mental well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. The enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being, without distinction of race, religion, political beliefs or economic and social conditions”(WHO, 1948).1 Based on this definition, National Institute Health Excellence (NICE, 2012) defines Health Inequalities as “an inability to attain the health among different groups or individuals due to difference in their social, geographical, cultural/behavioural, biological or other factors.”2 In simpler terms, health inequalities can be defined as “an unjust disparity in the health when these differences are not only preventable but are also unnecessary”.3 To further explain these differences, different theoretical attempts were made including social class, material deprivation, behaviour and culture, artefact, environmental and selection theory, the geographical aspects, difference in genetics and the life course perception of health played a vital role in understanding the health inequalities.3 The diagram above shows the various causes of health inequalities divided into different categories of fundamental causes; environmental influences; and finally individual experiences which finally in-turn lead to the disparity in wellbeing and health of different groups or individuals. The fundamental causes are the factors which cannot be undone such as, Global economic forces, socio-political environment and priorities lead to an unequal distribution of income, power and wealth which can further trigger poverty and marginalization of the individuals belonging to different social groups and classes. These initial differences further influence the distribution of environmental influences, such as availability or accessibility of employment, schooling, better housing, health services and various societal