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HTML and CSS formatting

HTML and CSS formatting.

Have a space between menu (<nav>) and header image and I don’t know why. Also the CSS for h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, { … doesn’t seem to be formatting the headers correctly. See code below, thanks.<!DOCTYPE HTML><html><head><meta charset=”utf-8″><title>Chocol8</title><link href=’http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Sofia’ rel=’stylesheet’ type=’text/css’><style type=”text/css”><!–body {background: #42413C;margin: 0;padding: 0;color: #000;background-color: #F8EAC0;}/* ~~ Element/tag selectors ~~ */ul, ol, dl { /* Due to variations between browsers, it’s best practices to zero padding and margin on lists. For consistency, you can either specify the amounts you want here, or on the list items (LI, DT, DD) they contain. Remember that what you do here will cascade to the .nav list unless you write a more specific selector. */padding: 0;margin: 0;}li{float:left;}h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6, {font-family: ‘Sofia’, cursive, Palatino Linotype, Book Antiqua, Palatino, serif;color: #673B15;margin-top: 0; /* removing the top margin gets around an issue where margins can escape from their containing block. The remaining bottom margin will hold it away from any elements that follow. */padding-right: 15px;padding-left: 15px; /* adding the padding to the sides of the elements within the blocks, instead of the block elements themselves, gets rid of any box model math. A nested block with side padding can also be used as an alternate method. */}p {font: 100%/1.4 “Palatino Linotype”, “Book Antiqua”, Palatino, serif;margin-top: 0; /* removing the top margin gets around an issue where margins can escape from their containing block. The remaining bottom margin will hold it away from any elements that follow. */padding-right: 15px;padding-left: 15px; /* adding the padding to the sides of the elements within the blocks, instead of the block elements themselves, gets rid of any box model math. A nested block with side padding can also be used as an alternate method. */}a img { /* this selector removes the default blue border displayed in some browsers around an image when it is surrounded by a link */border: none;}/* ~~ Styling for your site’s links must remain in this order – including the group of selectors that create the hover effect. ~~ */a:link {color: #F8EAC0;text-decoration: underline; /* unless you style your links to look extremely unique, it’s best to provide underlines for quick visual identification */}a:visited {color: #E8DAAE;text-decoration: underline;}a:hover, a:active, a:focus { /* this group of selectors will give a keyboard navigator the same hover experience as the person using a mouse. */text-decoration: none;color: #E8DAAE;}/* ~~ This fixed width container surrounds all other blocks ~~ */.container {width: 960px;background: #FFFFFF;margin: 0 auto; /* the auto value on the sides, coupled with the width, centers the layout */}/* ~~ The header is not given a width. It will extend the full width of your layout. ~~ */header {background: #A3704A; }/* ~~ These are the columns for the layout. ~~ 1) Padding is only placed on the top and/or bottom of the block elements. The elements within these blocks have padding on their sides. This saves you from any “box model math”. Keep in mind, if you add any side padding or border to the block itself, it will be added to the width you define to create the *total* width. You may also choose to remove the padding on the element in the block element and place a second block element within it with no width and the padding necessary for your design.2) No margin has been given to the columns since they are all floated. If you must add margin, avoid placing it on the side you’re floating toward (for example: a right margin on a block set to float right). Many times, padding can be used instead. For blocks where this rule must be broken, you should add a “display:inline” declaration to the block element’s rule to tame a bug where some versions of Internet Explorer double the margin.3) Since classes can be used multiple times in a document (and an element can also have multiple classes applied), the columns have been assigned class names instead of IDs. For example, two sidebar blocks could be stacked if necessary. These can very easily be changed to IDs if that’s your preference, as long as you’ll only be using them once per document.4) If you prefer your nav on the left instead of the right, simply float these columns the opposite direction (all left instead of all right) and they’ll render in reverse order. There’s no need to move the blocks around in the HTML source.*/.sidebar1 {float: right;width: 180px;background: #EADCAE;padding-bottom: 10px;}.content {padding: 10px 0;width: 780px;float: right;}/* ~~ This grouped selector gives the lists in the .content area space ~~ */.content ul, .content ol {padding: 0 15px 15px 40px; /* this padding mirrors the right padding in the headings and paragraph rule above. Padding was placed on the bottom for space between other elements on the lists and on the left to create the indention. These may be adjusted as you wish. */}/* ~~ The navigation list styles (can be removed if you choose to use a premade flyout menu like Spry) ~~ */nav ul {list-style: none; /* this removes the list marker */border-top: 0px solid #666; /* this creates the top border for the links – all others are placed using a bottom border on the LI */margin-bottom: 15px; /* this creates the space between the navigation on the content below */}nav ul li {border-bottom: 0px solid #666; /* this creates the button separation */}nav ul a, nav ul a:visited { /* grouping these selectors makes sure that your links retain their button look even after being visited */padding: 5px 5px 5px 15px;display: block; /* this gives the link block properties causing it to fill the whole LI containing it. This causes the entire area to react to a mouse click. */width: 160px;  /*this width makes the entire button clickable for IE6. If you don’t need to support IE6, it can be removed. Calculate the proper width by subtracting the padding on this link from the width of your sidebar container. */text-decoration: none;background: #A3704A;}nav ul a:hover, nav ul a:active, nav ul a:focus { /* this changes the background and text color for both mouse and keyboard navigators */background: #A3704A;color: #F8EAC0;}/* ~~ The footer ~~ */footer {padding: 10px 0;background: #CCC49F;position: relative;/* this gives IE6 hasLayout to properly clear */clear: both; /* this clear property forces the .container to understand where the columns end and contain them */}/*HTML 5 support – Sets new HTML 5 tags to display:block so browsers know how to render the tags properly. */header, section, footer, aside, nav, article, figure {display: block;}–></style><!–[if lt IE 9]><script src=”http://html5shiv.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/html5.js”></script><![endif]–></head><body><div class=”container”>  <header>  <img src=”chocol8-banner.png” alt=”chocol8-banner” width=”960″ height=”400″>   </header>   <nav>      <ul>        <li><a href=”#”>Home</a></li>        <li><a href=”#”>About</a></li>        <li><a href=”#”>Contact</a></li>        <li><a href=”#”>Blog</a></li>      </ul>    </nav>  <div class=”sidebar1″>    <aside>      <p> The above links demonstrate a basic navigational structure using an unordered list styled with CSS. Use this as a starting point and modify the properties to produce your own unique look. If you require flyout menus, create your own using a Spry menu, a menu widget from Adobe’s Exchange or a variety of other javascript or CSS solutions.</p>      <p>If you would like the navigation along the top, simply move the ul to the top of the page and recreate the styling.</p>    </aside>  <!– end .sidebar1 –></div>  <article class=”content”>    <h1>Instructions</h1>    <section>     <h2>How to use this document</h2>      <p>Be aware that the CSS for these layouts is heavily commented. If you do most of your work in Design view, have a peek at the code to get tips on working with the CSS for the fixed layouts. You can remove these comments before you launch your site. To learn more about the techniques used in these CSS Layouts, read this article at Adobe’s Developer Center – <a href=”http://www.adobe.com/go/adc_css_layouts”>http://www.adobe.com/go/adc_css_layouts</a>.</p>    </section>    <section>      <h2>Clearing Method</h2>      <p>Because all the columns are floated, this layout uses a clear:both declaration in the footer rule.  This clearing technique forces the .container to understand where the columns end in order to show any borders or background colors you place on the .container. If your design requires you to remove the footer from the .container, you’ll need to use a different clearing method. The most reliable will be to add a &lt;br class=&quot;clearfloat&quot; /&gt; or &lt;div  class=&quot;clearfloat&quot;&gt;&lt;/div&gt; after your final floated column (but before the .container closes). This will have the same clearing effect. </p>    </section>    <section>      <h2>Logo Replacement</h2>      <p>An image placeholder was used in this layout in the header where you’ll likely want to place  a logo. It is recommended that you remove the placeholder and replace it with your own linked logo. </p>      <p> Be aware that if you use the Property inspector to navigate to your logo image using the SRC field (instead of removing and replacing the placeholder), you should remove the inline background and display properties. These inline styles are only used to make the logo placeholder show up in browsers for demonstration purposes. </p>      <p>To remove the inline styles, make sure your CSS Styles panel is set to Current. Select the image, and in the Properties pane of the CSS Styles panel, right click and delete the display and background properties. (Of course, you can always go directly into the code and delete the inline styles from the image or placeholder there.)</p>    </section>    <section>      <h2>Backgrounds</h2>      <p>By nature, the background color on any block element will only show for the length of the content. This means if you’re using a background color or border to create the look of a side column, it won’t extend all the way to the footer but will stop when the content ends. If the .content block will always contain more content, you can place a border on the .content block to divide it from the column.</p>    </section>    <!– end .content –></article>  <footer>    <p>This footer contains the declaration position:relative; to give Internet Explorer 6 hasLayout for the footer and cause it to clear correctly. If you’re not required to support IE6, you may remove it.</p>    <address>      Address Content    </address>  </footer><!– end .container –></div></body></html>
HTML and CSS formatting

Seattle University Interpersonal Communication Reflection Paper.

Reflective Journals (50 pts ): You will be required to write a total of three 2-3 page journal entry (double-spaced), in which you describe and reflect on an interpersonal communication concept discussed in class. The contents of this journal will remain confidential with the instructor, so please work to create genuine observations and comments in these journals. Each entry will be worth 50 points.What is the most significant intersection of your identity?–Explain why it outweighs your other identities and how it contributes and affects your communication style.RubricReflection PaperReflection PaperCriteriaRatingsPtsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeContent Reflection – Depth Analysis-facts are consistently linked to thesis with highly effective explanations-contains examples of critical thinking-complex understanding of topic demonstrated-excellent coverage/diversity of topics from the units we covered in class25.0 ptsAccomplished15.0 ptsDeveloping0.0 ptsUnsatisfactory-Beginning25.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeWriting Quality-very clearly highlights main points to follow (without providing details)-very smooth flow between sentences-thesis is clear, concise, highly significant & relates to entire essay-highly effective topic & concluding sentences (consistent, clear links to thesis) and paragraph structure-very well organized & smooth transition from one idea to the next-a highly effective/impactful clinch is used-clear summary of main points presented (with no new data added)-smooth flow of summary points15.0 ptsAccomplished10.0 ptsDeveloping0.0 ptsUnsatisfactory-Beginning15.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeStyle – Syntax and Mechanics-correct spelling, grammar and sentence structure used effectively almost all of the time10.0 ptsAccomplished6.0 ptsDeveloping0.0 ptsUnsatisfactory – Beginning10.0 ptsTotal Points: 50.0
Seattle University Interpersonal Communication Reflection Paper

Effects of Alzheimer’s On Response Times

John C. Hemby Physiological Psychology Dr. Colleen Miron There are many advances in science that has allowed us to understand, cope and in some cases treat certain diseases of the brain. However, there is much we still do not know about many of them. Alzheimer’s would be one of these disorders. The text states that Alzheimer’s is defined as a persistent, degenerating disorder that inhibits the brain’s cells or neurons and thus resulting in memory loss, language skills and rapid changes in behavior (Kalat, 2012). This usually occurs in the older aged population, around the age of sixty-five and isn’t considered to be a normal part of the aging process. According to an Alzheimer’s organization website, a person is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s every sixty-seven seconds and that there are currently more than 5 million Americans that have this disease (Help End Alzheimer’s, n.d.). One of the issues of having this disease deals with enumeration or recollection of numbers by counting. The text states that individuals with Alzheimer’s cannot recall learning certain skills i.e. golfing and are often surprised when they do well (Kalat, 2012). This research in this article is important because it shows how well a person with Alzheimer’s can quickly recall how many numbers are in a certain area just by looking at it. This is a simple experiment in that it will be easy to measure the reaction times and the task of counting isn’t that complex in comparison to golfing. According to the article, individuals that have Alzheimer’s sometimes have difficulty with visual enumeration. This means that a person with Alzheimer’s has difficulty counting visual numbers or tracking down a number in a specific area, i.e. looking for number 42 in a numerical list of 1-100. This study is unique in that finding the reaction time difference between older adults that have Alzheimer’s and those that don’t would be a quantifiable aspect and gives more proof to the damage that the brain receives from this disease. The researchers in this article are doctors Maylor, Watson and Muller and they studied the subject of visual enumeration in patients with Alzheimer’s in the year 2005. The hypothesis of the study was that the participants’ with Alzheimer’s would have a significant increase in response time in counting numbers, subitizing numbers(readily knowing a number just by looking at the amount of figures in a picture) and finding numbers in comparison to older adults that did not have Alzheimer’s (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). The study was conducted using participants from a resident home that specialized in the care of people with dementia. These participants were already diagnosed with dementia by professional health providers (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). There were a total of 12 participants whom had Alzheimer’s and their average age was 81 years old with 4 men and 8 women in the study. The other participants had an average age of 79 and only 8 participants; with only 3 being men and 5 were women. The researchers also gave the participants a Mini-Mental State Examination or MMSE, and the control group scored higher than the Alzheimer’s participants; 17.3 was the average for the Alzheimer’s participants and 29.4 was the average for the control group (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). Last, all of the participants were voluntary and did not receive any payments for their participation. The researchers used a laptop to be used as a visual for the participants. The laptop also measured response times (RT) and synched the displays. The participants utilized the spacebar key on the laptop as the response button. They put the screen at eye level with a distance of 60 cm. Then a researcher put in the responses with their own keypad. The stimuli on the screen were red circles displayed on a black background. They randomly generated the stimuli in order to avoid any counting ahead (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). The experimenter conducted the tests individually in a room that was either at the resident facility or at the home of the control group participant and the room had nothing but the laptop and the two people conducting the experiment. The initial test was the MMSE and then an enumeration task, a block of demonstration on the task, 3 turns of practice trials and last, there were 3 turns of experimental trials (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). The participants were required to press the spacebar for how many circles they saw. The results of the study indicated that the Alzheimer’s participants were slower than the control group, 1.4 seconds to be exact. The data was analyzed by using ANOVA’s to demonstrate the difference in response time and the accuracy of the numbers between the two groups. However, they had the same accuracy in seeing how many items were currently present on the monitor (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). There were some differences in the results with the numbering portion of the experiment. The participants with Alzheimer’s had a significant reduction in response time in comparison to the control group in the subitization part. The second part, counting, the Alzheimer’s participants were significantly slower than their counterparts as well. The hypothesis was supported by the results of the experiment (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). The conclusion of this study shows a definitive, qualitative answer between Alzheimer’s and normal older adults’ response time. This in turn shows where to start on how to improve those with Alzheimer’s response time especially since there isn’t any issue with their accuracy (Maylor, Watson, and Muller, 2005). There were several issues with this study. First, instead of using a cross sectional study, the researchers should have utilized a longitudinal study; that way they could see how slower the participants got overtime as their Alzheimer’s progressed. The second issue is that they should have acquired individuals that had just become diagnosed with early stages of Alzheimer’s; in the study they give no indication on what stage these participants were at. Last, there was an issue with the amount of participants in the study. The average was too generalized and needed a larger group to narrow down the averages (mean) in order to acquire a higher quality of data. There are some different avenues of approach for future studies on this particular subject. The first approach could be that men and women may suffer from Alzheimer’s differently, therefore in the future the men and women should be separated into different groups. This would show if there were any differences between the sexes. The next idea is that according to the text, those that drink coffee are less likely to have Alzheimer’s (Kalat, 2012). So for a future research idea, one should have the participants drink coffee for a while before starting the experiment. This could show if the effects of Alzheimer’s are mitigated when given a stimulant, i.e. caffeine. The last idea would have to be instead of utilizing numbers, use matching words. For example, gauge a participant’s reaction time by having a word on the screen and then the participant has to choose a synonym for that word i.e. happy equals jovial. This would show if a participant with Alzheimer’s can recall a larger vocabulary and in a timely manner. References Help End Alzheimer’s. (n.d.). Retrieved December 19, 2014, from http://www.alz.org/ Kalat, James W. Biological Psychology, 11th Edition. Cengage Learning, 01/2012. VitalBook file. Maylor, E. A., Watson, D. G.,

Colorado State University Criminology Theories & Social Learning Theory Paper

essay writing service free Colorado State University Criminology Theories & Social Learning Theory Paper.

1. Examine your personal life course. What turning points did you experience that led to where you are today. As part of this response please identify a criminological theory which best helps describe and or explain your unique experiences. 2. Keeping labeling theory in mind, does sex registration (of convicted sex offenders) serve the public interests, and or does this labeling process do more harm than good? Fully explain and defend your views.Note: This Discussion is directly connected to the following Course Learning Objectives:LO1. Analyze the main assumptions of prominent theories within criminology (e.g., Strain Theory, Classical Criminology, Learning Theory, Labeling Theory, Rational Choice Theory, and others) to current topics within the criminal justice arena;LO7. Critique the effects of sex offender registration on pedophile recidivism rates
Colorado State University Criminology Theories & Social Learning Theory Paper

ENG 120 Cuyumaca Reproducing Racism Everyday Choices Lock In White Advantage Analysis

ENG 120 Cuyumaca Reproducing Racism Everyday Choices Lock In White Advantage Analysis.

Step 1: Review the Prompt. Essay: Literary AnalysisObjectivesUse all phases of the writing process to create a largely error free essay, understand and use an academic article to analyze an element of culture, research, synthesize, integrate, and contextualize multiple outside sources (through quotations, paraphrasing, and summary) with their own voice, analysis, or position, while avoiding plagiarism. Employ a variety of organizational patterns to support or advance central ideas (theses/claims). Minimum Length4-6 pages Prompt: Your goal is to choose one of the following prompts to form your essay from:Theme Analysis: Choose and analyze a theme from your chosen book(s): What is a major theme that is developed in your book and how is it developed? Rhetorical Analysis: Analyze the author’s use of rhetoric in your chosen work. Was the author’s argument successful? Why was it effective, mostly effective, mostly uneffective, or not effective at all? Comparative Analysis: Analyze your chosen work in relation to another. (This could be the movie of your work, or some other related piece.) Which piece is more successful and why? Successful essays will do this by:Using standard essay format: introduction, at least two body paragraphs, counterargument, and a conclusion. At least two outside sources to support your understanding of the work(s) An academic summary of your anchor text in the introduction (your book) Clear thesis that answers your chosen prompt with a limited subject (your book) and your attitude about it (your argument) Creative titleMLA Format: Double-spaced, Times New RomanIncludes a Works Cited page in MLA format that is separate from the 4-6 page minimum length. Includes at least six direct quotes from your bookIf you are using a secondary book, you must include at least four quotes from that source as wellIncludes at least three direct quotes from outside sourcesProject Formats For this essay, please choose a format to present it in: Traditional Essay: If you choose this format, you will write and submit a traditional essayTED Talk: If you choose this format, you will write and record your essay like a speech, and submit a recorded version of itGoogle Slides/PowerPoint Presentation: If you choose this format, you will be using either Google Slides or PowerPoint or similar program to present your argument. YouTube Video: This is similar to the TED Talk option, but create a YouTube video based on your findings/argument. (Both Lindsay Ellis and READUS 101 are great examples of how this would look.) Feel free, no matter which format you choose to be creative with it: make it pretty, add art and style. I want you to have fun with this. Step Three: Answer the following questions. Do you have any questions for me about the prompts or formats?Which prompt do you think you want to use for this essay and why? Which format do you think you would like to use? Do you have any anxiety or confusion over completing this writing task to the best of your ability?
ENG 120 Cuyumaca Reproducing Racism Everyday Choices Lock In White Advantage Analysis

DVU R Programming Shiny Project & Working with ggplot Programming Exercise

DVU R Programming Shiny Project & Working with ggplot Programming Exercise.

7.3 SHINY PROJECT 1CREATING CODERecreate the R code found in Chapter 4 “Creating Your First shiny Project” from your readings in this module. The complete code appears following Figure 4-5. Stop before the “Working with ggplot” section.Execute your code and then take a screenshot of your output. Move your slider and take a second screenshot of that output. Paste both screenshots into a document and submit your results for this assignment. You do not need to include your code in this submission.Shiny Project #2Creating codeModify the base R version (not the ggplot version) of the “Another shiny Project” found in Chapter 4 of this module’s readings. Replace the “airquality” data set with the R built-in data set “mtcars”.Use only the variables mpg, disp, hp, drat, wt, and qsec from the mtcars data set. Pick any two variables which make sense to use for the regression equation.Copy your R code and program output in a document and submit your results for this assignment.
DVU R Programming Shiny Project & Working with ggplot Programming Exercise