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HAS 3109 RC Trends that have a Great Influence on Managed Healthcare Discussion Paper

HAS 3109 RC Trends that have a Great Influence on Managed Healthcare Discussion Paper.

Throughout the course, you have been learning about managed care, both past and present. Conduct additional research on trends happening in managed care today. The following websites are a great place to start:Centers for Medicare & Medicaid ServicesKaiser Family Foundation (Search for the series on health care marketplace trends.)You can also visit the following videos related to managed care trends:Managed Care contracting and Payer ScorecardsMonitoring Performance: A Dashboard of Medi-Cal Managed CareAfter conducting your research, construct a 3-4pages report of your findings. At a minimum, your report shouldIdentify at least two trends that you feel have a great impact on managed health care today.Discuss the effect these trends have on managed care.Explain how these trends will continue to influence managed care in the future.Evaluate the potential impact on government and state sponsored, Medicare and Medicaid programs.Analyze and provide at least two reasons why implementing Medicaid managed care is so complex.
HAS 3109 RC Trends that have a Great Influence on Managed Healthcare Discussion Paper

Key Resources

Key Resources. I’m trying to learn for my Business class and I’m stuck. Can you help?

Few would argue that, in order for a business to sustain its success, there has to be value beyond the mere product or service they bring to the market place. Every business has intrinsic value embedded within their assets. Some of these might be overt while others might be hidden and less obvious. For example, the holder of a patent or a retail store’s location would be considered a key resource.

Research and discuss at least two other key resources that support a business’ success. How does this connect to their customers and ongoing success? Use examples to support your thoughts and ideas!

Key Resources

Straw Bale Home Construction

assignment writer Straw bale home construction is a green building method that uses bales of straw as structural support, insulation, or both. Generally, this method of building has numerous advantages over conventional building systems because straw is a renewable source, low cost, easily available, and has a high insulation value. The two forms of straw bale construction are load-bearing (Nebraska style) which uses the bales of straw as structural support and non-load bearing (infill) which uses the bales of straw as insulation between traditional wood framed walls. Non-load bearing straw bale homes is easier to obtain permits and working with building code officials because officials view straw bales as an alternative insulation material, but since the structural elements are familiar, infill straw bale is less intimidating to contractors not already familiar with this type of construction. The construction process for a non-load bearing straw bale home is very similar to a convention home build, and it is typically less expensive to build. During the 21st century, society is aware of climate change, more intense storm systems (i.e. hurricane Katrina), and other environmental impacts that could potentially harm mankind. In an effort to combat such impacts, technology is now even more present in the construction industry, and society is beginning to turn towards sustainable resources and green building materials as an alternative to conventional construction. While buildings are our place of residency, employment, and playground that protect us from nature’s extremes, green building is the practice of creating and using healthier and more resource-efficient models of construction, renovation, operation, maintenance, and demolition (“Green Building,” 2009). In the United States, buildings account for 39% of total energy use, 12% of total water consumption, 68% of total electricity consumption, and 38% of carbon dioxide emissions (“Why Build Green,” 2009). Construction has an impact on the natural environment, human health, and the economy. By utilizing an alternative more sustainable resources into building construction, buildings will benefit society, the economy, and the environment from minimizing strain on local infrastructure, reducing operating costs while optimizing life-cycle performance, and preserving our natural resources from protecting ecosystems, reducing waste streams, and improving air and water quality (“Why Build Green,” 2009). Straw bale home construction is an example of a green building method. Straw is a renewable resource, relatively inexpensive, and when put into practical use, extremely energy efficient (“Choosing Green Materials and Products,” 2009). Straw bale construction uses bales of straw as structural elements, insulation, or both (“Straw Bale Construction,” 2009). Straw has been used in construction since the early 20th century in many types of buildings because it provides excellent tensile strength, great insulation value, and additional structural integrity. There are some 75 year-old buildings still inhabited today (Jacoby, 2001). Straw bale home construction started in the Midwestern United States, especially in Nebraska because the grass in plentiful (“Straw Bale Construction,” 2009). This green building approach has been put into more practical use at the turn of the 21st century. The United States currently wastes 200 million tons of straw each year, and the United States Department of Agriculture indicates that American farmers annually harvest enough straw to build about 4 million, 2,000 square foot homes each year which is roughly 4 times the number of houses currently constructed (Jacoby, 2001). Generally, straw bale construction has numerous advantages over conventional building systems because straw is a renewable resource, eco-friendly, strong and durable, completely biodegradable, inexpensive, readily available, and has a high insulation value (“Straw Bale Construction,” 2009). Currently, there are two forms of straw bale home construction. The most common, load-bearing or Nebraska style, uses the bales of straw as structural support while non-load bearing or infill uses the bales of straw as insulation between traditional posts and beamed framed walls (Hart, 2009). Non-load bearing straw bale construction is more beneficial than conventional home construction because straw bales has a high sound absorption coefficient, high insulating qualities with an average R-values of 42 while an R-value of 19 is considered to be super insulated, and this method of construction can incorporate conventional building methods as well (Jacoby, 2001). However straw bale builders face many drawbacks. The design and construction of the straw bale home requires careful detailing to prevent liquid water infiltration, requires breathable finishes, generally plaster over the straw, requires educating the owner, the builder, permitting officials, and requires close interaction with building code officials in regions that do not currently have codes for straw bale home construction. Financing a straw bale home is rather difficult because banks are less likely to lend because it is an alternative method, unknown conditions exist, or there is a lack of building codes in place (Phyers, n.d.). In the recent years, this is rapidly changing, and building code officials are more likely to permit non-load bearing straw homes because the structural system is an independent element, because it utilizes conventional techniques, and it can be engineered according to load requirements and building codes (Jacoby, 2001). Most residential post and beam house framing in North America today is built using stud construction or timber framing, and it could incorporate exposed timber throughout the structure (Post And Beam House: Timber Framing versus Standard Stud Construction, 2008). Non-load bearing straw bale construction uses post and beam framing and/or stud construction as the structural support then uses straw bales to infill as an independent element. This method of construction does not rely on bales to carry any of the building loads other than the weight of the bales themselves (Jacoby, 2001). Figure 1 on the proceeding page is a detail of a non-load bearing house. The drawing depicts a slab-on-grade foundation, size of timber to be used, orientation of the straw bales, and number of straw bale layers needed to reach the height of the ceiling. Non-load bearing straw bale construction is easier obtaining permits and working with building code officials because officials view straw bales as an alternative insulation material, and since the structural elements are familiar, infill straw bale is less intimidating to contractors not already familiar with this type of construction (Overview of Straw Bale Construction, 2000). The construction process for a non-load bearing straw bale home is relatively simple. This process is not much different than a conventional home build. In a non-load bearing straw bale home build, typically just the perimeter walls are infilled with straw bales, and all structural components must be constructed first. This includes the foundation (this could vary depending on the current building code as noted in the building code section in the proceeding pages), the stud walls and floor joists are constructed, and finally the roof is installed. Interior walls can be constructed before or after the straw bales are infilled. Some building codes require non-load bearing straw bale structure to install the straw bales “in the dry.” Simply stated, the straw bales can only be placed once the roof is constructed and finished roofing is installed. Then, the straw bales can then be placed between the structural elements and around all openings including windows and doors. Depending on the ceiling height, there are typically about 7-8 straw bale layers needed to reach the ceiling height. Any remaining interior walls will then be constructed to allow for electrical and plumbing rough-in. Electrical can be installed two different ways, hidden or exposed. If the electrical is to be hidden, conduit is run between the straw bale layers per building code while if the electrical is to be exposed, the conduit is run above the ceiling, in the roof before being exposed down the side of the wall. A cement/lime plaster and stucco is to be applied to the interior and exterior respectively. All windows and doors are installed before the remaining finishes are applied (i.e. drywall, trim, paint). Finish plaster is applied to the interior and exterior before the remaining finish elements are completed. (Overview of Straw Bale Construction, 2000). Straw bales are an inexpensive building material. The material cost for straw bales walls are substantially lower than conventional stud walls. Generally, the cost of a straw bale wall is approximately 1/5 of the total home construction cost opposed to 1/2 of conventional home construction cost (Overview of Straw Bale Construction, 2000). However hired labor is very expensive (Jacoby, 2001). It is especially in the plastering process because it is a technical and time consuming process, but it is recommended to have community helpers or volunteers to assist with the plastering process to reduce labor costs (Overview of Straw Bale Construction, 2000). In comparison to the actual cost of a non-load bearing straw bale home to a conventional home, it depends on the how “green” the building will be. A straw bale home can be built for as little as $15 a square foot, to a typical range of $43-$73 a square foot, to upwards of $100 a square foot (Phyers, n.d.). In relation to the average home size of 2200 square feet, the cost of a straw bale home is $33,000, $94,600-$160,600, and $220,000 respectively. Non-load bearing straw bale homes is typically higher in cost because stud framing does still exist in the exterior to carry the load. Non-load bearing and load-bearing straw bale houses each have individual structural characteristics but while under testing conditions, have similar results. Researchers have been testing straw bales or straw bale structures in comparison to convention homes while under extreme wind conditions (i.e. hurricane), fire rating properties, and during an earthquake. All of these are acceptable tests depending on the region the home is to be built. Straw bales have a unique characteristic. Architects and Engineers have considered straw bales to be a seismic resistant building material (Morrison, 2009). Researching and testing has shown that while induced in gale force winds of up to 75mph, a straw bale structure will have no movement, but when tested in winds of up to 100mph, the structure only moves 1/16″ (Morrison, 2009). Furthermore, straw bales are dried straw, 3 times as fire resist as current building material finishes used in conventional homes. Dried straw only contains 8% moisture and lack the oxygen needed to ignite a flame (Morrison, 2009). Straw bales act as a shock absorber rather than rigid and breaking. In non-load bearing straw bales structures, the straw rests against the stud construction to absorb the shock of the earthquake. Even more astonishing, a straw bale cabin was built and placed on an earthquake testing machine. The cabin was tested in conditions many people have not experienced. The machine induced an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.6 on the Richter scale (Ecoville Architecs, 2009). Many regions of the United States do not have building codes that apply to green materials or straw bale structures. Many building officials lack the knowledge needed to approve a green building, in particular, straw bale housing. The approval rate in an area with insufficient or no green building codes is 50% among the code officials surveyed (DCAT, 2005). Nevertheless, the Midwest and West Coast contain the most straw bale building codes. Typically these codes are for both load-bearing and non-load bearing straw bale houses while some codes only focus on non-load bearing straw bale walls. The cities that currently have straw bale building codes are: Austin, Texas, multiple cities and counties in the state of California, Cortez, Colorado, parts of Nevada, Tucson, Arizona, parts of Nebraska, and the entire state of Oregon (Skillful Means, 2000). Tucson, Arizona is noted for requiring all straw bale houses to house doubled stem concrete block foundation walls filled with concrete rather than a slab-on-grade foundation (Phyers, n.d.). Regions that do not currently have straw bale building code like parts of Maryland and Pennsylvania are likely to adopt a code similar to Cortez, Colorado due to the nature and climate of the region, and they will typically require the use of non-load bearing straw bale structures while referring to load-bearing straw bale walls as experimental. Load-bearing straw bale walls are subject to the interpretation of the Uniform Building (Cortez SB Codes, 1997). Non-load bearing straw bale home construction is relatively similar to conventional home construction. Straw bales give owners the opportunity to use a renewable resource, which is eco-friendly, strong and durable, completely biodegradable, inexpensive, readily available, and has a high insulation value on the perimeter of the building (“Straw Bale Construction,” 2009). This will help reduce energy costs substantially. The overall cost is very similar to a conventional home, but by utilizing an alternative more sustainable resource into home construction, houses will benefit society, the economy, and the environment from minimizing strain on local infrastructure, reducing operating costs while optimizing life-cycle performance, and preserving our natural resources from protecting ecosystems, reducing waste streams, and improving air and water quality (“Why Build Green,” 2009). Building codes are starting to accept alternative “green” building methods, and a strong recommendation for a new home builder is to elect to use a non-load bearing straw bale system. The owner will not be disappointed.

SS 350 Herzing University Week 1 Unit 1 Impact of Technology Paper

SS 350 Herzing University Week 1 Unit 1 Impact of Technology Paper.

Unit 1 Impact of TechnologySubmit AssignmentDue Sunday by 11:59pm Points 85Submitting a text entry box or a file uploadInstructionsDevelop: Reflection EssayEvaluation Title: Impact of TechnologyPlease write a reflective page essay. In your essay, draw upon the Unit 1 reading material to answer the following questions:What is “technology?”What specific technological advancement(s) have impacted human beings?Do you think the impact of technology on human beings has been generally positive OR do you think the impact of technology on human beings has been generally negative?Be sure to explain your reasoning.RequirementsWrite a 2-3-page essay*Essay Content:Introductory paragraph: Brief problem statement (1-sentence), thesis question, thesis statement.Body paragraphs that answer the above questions AND support your thesis statement.Concluding paragraph that summarizes your paperAPA formatted in-text citations (Links to an external site.) to support all factual claims.APA formatted reference page (Links to an external site.)*Title page is NOT included in final page count. Thus, if you write a 3-page paper, you will submit a total of 4 pages that includes the title page.Contact the Writing Center and/or instructor if you have any questions on writing a formal essay.Estimated time to complete: 3 hoursRubricSS350 Unit 1 Assignment – Impact of TechnologySS350 Unit 1 Assignment – Impact of TechnologyCriteriaRatingsPtsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeTopic8.0 ptsLevel 5Identifies a creative, focused, and manageable topic clearly addressing important points.7.0 ptsLevel 4Identifies a manageable topic that addresses important points.6.0 ptsLevel 3Identifies a focused topic that addresses important points.5.0 ptsLevel 2Identifies a topic that while doable, is too narrowly focused.4.0 ptsLevel 1Identifies a topic that is far too general and wide-ranging as to be doable.0.0 ptsLevel 0Does not clearly identify a topic or identifies a topic that is not relevant to the assignment.8.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeExisting Knowledge, Research, and/or Views8.0 ptsLevel 5Uses in-depth information from relevant sources representing multiple points of views (3 or more) or research aspects (3 or more).7.0 ptsLevel 4Describes in-depth information from relevant sources representing at least two points of view or research aspects.6.0 ptsLevel 3Explains information from relevant sources representing at least two points of view or research aspects.5.0 ptsLevel 2Relates information from relevant and irrelevant sources. No clear point of view(s) of approach(es) are identified.4.0 ptsLevel 1Tells information from irrelevant sources representing a single point of view or does not identify points of view or approaches.0.0 pts0Information is irrelevant to the topic. No clear point of view/approaches.8.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeContentSS350-CO1; SS350-CO318.0 ptsLevel 5Demonstrates the ability to construct a clear and insightful problem statement/thesis statement/topic statement with evidence of all relevant contextual factors.16.0 ptsLevel 4Demonstrates the ability to construct a problem statement, thesis statement/topic statement with evidence of most relevant contextual factors, and problem statement is adequately detailed.14.0 ptsLevel 3Begins to demonstrate the ability to construct a problem statement/thesis statement/topic statement with evidence of most relevant contextual factors, but problem statement is superficial.13.0 ptsLevel 2Demonstrates a limited ability in identifying a problem statement/thesis statement/topic statement or related contextual factors.11.0 ptsLevel 1Demonstrates the ability to explain contextual factors but does not provide a defined statement.0.0 ptsLevel 0There is no evidence of a defined statement.18.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeAnalysis18.0 ptsLevel 5Organizes and compares evidence to reveal insightful patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus.16.0 ptsLevel 4Organizes and interprets evidence to reveal patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus.14.0 ptsLevel 3Organizes and describes evidence according to patterns, differences, or similarities related to focus.13.0 ptsLevel 2Organizes evidence, but the organization is not effective in revealing patterns, differences, or similarities.11.0 ptsLevel 1Describes evidence, but it is not organized and/or is unrelated to focus.0.0 ptsLevel 0Lists evidence, but it is not organized and/or is unrelated to focus.18.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeConclusion9.0 ptsLevel 5Assembles a conclusion that is a logical interpretation from findings.8.0 ptsLevel 4Constructs a conclusion that is logical from inquiry findings.7.0 ptsLevel 3Identifies a conclusion specifically from and responds specifically to the findings.6.0 ptsLevel 2Produces a general conclusion that, because it is so general, also applies beyond the scope of the inquiry findings.5.0 ptsLevel 1States an ambiguous or unsupportable conclusion from findings.0.0 pts0States an illogical conclusion from findings.9.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeLimitations and Implications9.0 ptsLevel 5Insightfully discusses in detail relevant and supported limitations and implications.8.0 ptsLevel 4Examines relevant and supported limitations and implications.7.0 ptsLevel 3Discusses relevant and supported limitations and implications.6.0 ptsLevel 2Presents relevant and supported limitations and implications.2.0 ptsLevel 1Presents limitations and implications, but they are unsupported.0.0 pts0Presents limitations and implications, but they are irrelevant.9.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeWriting9.0 ptsLevel 5The paper exhibits an excellent command of written English language conventions. The paper has no errors in mechanics, grammar, or spelling.8.0 ptsLevel 4The paper exhibits a good command of written English language conventions. The paper has no errors in mechanics or spelling with minor grammatical errors that impair the flow of communication.6.0 ptsLevel 3The paper exhibits a basic command of written English language conventions. The paper has minor errors in mechanics, grammar, or spelling that impact the flow of communication.5.0 ptsLevel 2The paper exhibits a limited command of written English language conventions. The paper has frequent errors in mechanics, grammar, or spelling that impede the flow of communication.3.0 ptsLevel 1The paper exhibits little command of written English language conventions. The paper has errors in mechanics, grammar, or spelling that cause the reader to stop and reread parts of the writing to discern meaning.0.0 ptsLevel 0The paper does not demonstrate command of written English language conventions. The paper has multiple errors in mechanics, grammar, or spelling that cause the reader difficulty discerning the meaning.9.0 ptsThis criterion is linked to a Learning OutcomeAPAPRICE-I6.0 ptsLevel 5The required APA elements are all included with correct formatting, including in-text citations and references.5.0 ptsLevel 4The required APA elements are all included with minor formatting errors, including in-text citations and references.4.0 ptsLevel 3The required APA elements are all included with multiple formatting errors, including in-text citations and references.2.0 ptsLevel 2The required APA elements are not all included and/or there are major formatting errors, including in-text citations and references.1.0 ptsLevel 1Several APA elements are missing. The errors in formatting demonstrate limited understanding of APA guidelines, in-text-citations, and references.0.0 ptsLevel 0There is little to no evidence of APA formatting and/or there are no in-text citations and/or references.6.0 ptsTotal Points: 85.0PreviousNext
SS 350 Herzing University Week 1 Unit 1 Impact of Technology Paper

Truman State University Corporate Taxation Discussion

Truman State University Corporate Taxation Discussion.

Answer the following questions (2 Paragraph each) 1) Describe the key features and benefits of a 401(k) Plan. 2) Describe the key features and benefits of a 529 Plan. 3) Describe the differences between ISO and NQSO plans. Please explain the tax rules associated with each type of stock option plan. 4) What is the benefit of the 65-day rule? Reference Website https://horizon-advisors.com/65-day-rule/ https://www.americanbar.org/groups/taxation/publications/abataxtimes_home/20feb/20feb-pp-lepore-trust-estate-distributions/#:~:text=rules%20in%20turn.-,65%2DDay%20Rule%3A%20The%20Law,of%20the%20prior%20tax%20year. 5) For innocent spouse relief to apply, five conditions must be met. Explain them. Reference Website https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/innocent-spouse-relief 6) In January of the current year, Stan Signowski’s U.S. employer assigned him to their Paris office. This year, he earned salary, a cost-of-living allowance, a housing allowance, a home leave allowance that permits him to return home once each year, and an education allowance to pay for U.S. schooling for his son. Stan and his wife, Jennifer, have rented an apartment in Paris and paid French income taxes. What tax issues does Stan need to consider when preparing his tax return?
Truman State University Corporate Taxation Discussion