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HA4 5210 University of Georgia Affordable Care Act & Healthcare Management Discussion

HA4 5210 University of Georgia Affordable Care Act & Healthcare Management Discussion.

Examine the Florida Department of Health Palm Beach County Community Health Needs Assessment.This local community health needs assessment conducted in August 2016 was updated in 2018 in collaboration with community stakeholders representing healthcare providers, community members, and other agencies informed on the social and economic needs of the community-at-large.As you read the community health needs assessment, ask yourself the following questions:Is this geographical area metropolitan, urban, or rural?What are the demographic and socioeconomic statuses within this geographical area?Are there disparities among the residents? What are the disparities?What are the key health issues within the community?What is the rate of obesity, diabetes, mental health disease, and substance abuse/addiction?What are the contributing factors to morbidity and mortality in this community?What are the challenges for the community to access healthcare services?What are the identified community strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats?What are some of the issues a community hospital can help alleviate? What is your next step as the CEO of the local hospital to become a partner with the community health department to address the community health needs?Use your answers to these questions to prepare your critique report with a brief introduction to the assignment citing the needs assessment, a section discussing your findings, and your summary how your hospital can enhance community needs by forming a partnership with community health and the benefit to both entities.Your paper needs to include citations within the narrative to support your perspective and enhance your persuasiveness to enter into a collaborative community health partnership.Length: Minimum of 6 pages, not including title and reference pagesReferences: Include a minimum of 8 scholarly resources
HA4 5210 University of Georgia Affordable Care Act & Healthcare Management Discussion

Arts of the World Questions.

I’m working on a art question and need guidance to help me learn.

Download this document, answer the questions, and then upload your work as a WordDoc by May 7th at midnight.It will be scanned through Turnitin. You have one week to complete this work. You CAN refer to your notes and the book to help you answer questions; HOWEVER, you CANNOT directly copy and paste answers. You MUST show your understanding of the concepts, cultures, and artworks on this work in your OWN WORDS – do not use direct quotes. Plagiarized answers will earn a grade of 0
Arts of the World Questions

Share this: Facebook Twitter Reddit LinkedIn WhatsApp The Abuse of Adderall (Blog Project) By Monisha, Kyle, and Sashwat Ethics of Adderall With the recent surge in illegal Adderall use by students, there has been many concerns with the ethics of illicit use. There is three ways you could look at it. One way is the way that is currently being used now, in which we say this is an illegal aid to memory, alertness, and therefore we ban it. The second way to look at it would be that we use all kinds of aids in helping us be more alert and remember better, such as coffee, which is very useful, but it is not banned. In the future, there is a likely chance that new drugs come on the market, which enable us to be much more intelligent than we are right now, so are we then going to say ” We have no interest in being smarter?”. The third was of looking at it would concern the grading of students. One group of students will be using Adderall and another won’t, so does that mean we will be wanting better performance from the group that does use it in order to get an A? Will be then be lenient with regards to the non users in terms of achieving a high mark? The ethics of the use is not black-and-white, such as its legality and risks involved. Whenever there is a discussion of the advantages of students using Adderall, there will be without a doubt a comparison to steroids. The comparison usually forms this logic: Adderall helps to get ahead in class. Steroids allow you to get ahead in sports. Consequently, Adderall is just like a steroid, and steroids are cheating, which in turn makes Adderall bad. The problem with this argument is that sports and academics are two distinct fields. In sports, the outcome of the match only matters to the players and those directly associated with them. However, cognitive enhancement is different in that it is not a zero-sum game. If a student uses Adderall to further his education, that in no way affects any other student. Furthermore, when discussing research, using cognitive enhancements to develop a breakthrough in cancer research is beneficial to society, unlike when athletes use steroids in a selfish attempt to improve their own statistics. The use of Adderall in research could benefit all of mankind. However, there is still some issues of fairness that arises when discussing the use of Adderall in university. The reason for this is that students are usually not marked in vacuum, but on a curve, so if a student uses the drug to get ahead of her classmates, it will directly affect the whole class. An easy solution to this would be to legalize the use of Adderall and let all student takes it. However, that leads to another issue of fairness, in that drugs are expensive, and the legalization of Adderall will turn into a socioeconomic problem. Wealthy student would be able to purchase more of the drug than poorer students, as a result further widening the gap between the wealth and the non-wealthy students. How does Adderall work? The drug is a combination of two stereoisomers of amphetamine, which is a stimulant, and related to street drugs such as methamphetamine and ecstasy. The chemical structure of Adderall is close to that of family of neurotransmitters called catecholamine, which includes dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. Adderall’s similarity to these brain chemicals allows it to mimic the same actions. The catecholamine family functions in the area of the brain that is responsible for arousal and emotion. For example, dopamine has a crucial role in the pleasure and reward system, while norepinephrine is involved in the sympathetic nervous system, the same system that controls our “flight or fight” response. Finally epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, also partakes in the “flight or fight” response, and is involved in the rush we feel when exited or nervous. By being a catecholamine agonist, Adderall recreates these same sensations by binding to the receptors for epinephrine in the adrenal gland, and norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain. In addition, Adderall also blocks transporters the remove catecholamine to end the response, and instead allows for some reverse transport of the endogenous catecholamines out of the neuron and into the receptor so they too can bind. Adderall essentially overloads the brain with chemicals the leave us alert, ecstatic, and ready to take the day. But, like any drugs, Adderall also has some negative side effects. By causing an intense arousal, the drug can lead to anxiety and insomnia, which has the chance to manifest into a schizophrenia like psychosis . The side effects are not only limited to the brain. Adderall can affect the body as well, causing an increase in blood pressure and an elevated heart rate. This is not good for people who already have pre-existing heart problems. Finally, like all drugs, such as caffeine, Adderall has the prospective of being addictive, which is why it is a Schedule II Controlled Substance, in the same group as opium, methamphetamine, cocaine, and oxycodone, which all have a high risk of dependence. WHAT IS ADHD? ADHD or Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder is a very common psychiatric brain disorder. It is usually diagnosed between the ages of 7 and 12. Once it has been diagnosed, there are medications (which will be discussed later) to help deal with it, but there are no found cures to get rid of it. About 50% of people loose it as they age into their adulthood, but there are no ideas as to why this happens. It affects about 6% of children and therefore 3% of adults. ADHD slows the maturation of certain parts of the brain, which help with, strategic thought, making quick decisions and of course focusing. The symptoms first begin to show up as a child or young adolescent. When being clinically diagnosed, it is very hard to do so due to the fact that many people do not like to focus on things that bore them. It is difficult to tell whether someone is not focusing because they can’t or because they don’t want to. With that being said, some other symptoms include: loosing things, not following instructions, and not being organized. Not all of these symptoms always apply, and often times very few of them do. The Stigma There is an existing stigma that people with ADHD are less intelligent than others who do not have it. Intelligence is defined as: “1) the ability to adapt to the environment and 2) the ability to learn from previous experience.” People who have ADHD often do score lower on tests, but it has nothing to do with intelligence. It is just the fact that a test requires constant mental effort, which is something people with ADHD have trouble with. On a long test, people with ADHD are easily distracted and therefore may lose time on a test that way, or speed through questions without wanting to put in as much time and effort as someone who doesn’t have it. If tests were shorter than there would be very little difference in test scores of people with and without ADHD. When testing for ADHD, kids are given tests, which involve a wide range of problems and it is found that problems that can be answered in one step (math or patterns) are done very well, compared to longer questions (English based). The Solutions (Drug Free) As with many disorders, there are a multitude of ways to combat it, without the use of drugs. One simple solution is exercise. Exercising is a helpful way to help release stress physically, and to help combat ADHD. By releasing stress, kids are more likely to sit down and focus, whether it is studying or taking a test. Additionally playing sports encourages them to focus on something that they love or are passionate about, and by having this as an example, it teaches them that focusing is possible even if it is on something they don’t like as much. Additionally, there is another method to help people with ADHD focus. This is known as mindfulness based cognitive therapy. MBCT is a therapeutic way to help people with ADHD relax and focus. It focuses on being aware of their surroundings and being one with their body and mind. People who begin this meditation can begin with as little as 30 seconds per day, just sitting somewhere quiet and meditating. This can move upwards past 30 minutes, if it works. When silently meditating, it works best when the person envisions them self succeeding at something whether it is a test, presentation, or just another aspect of their life (staying organized). By imagining themself succeeding in a peaceful environment, it often actually translates to the real world. Adderall Controversies While Adderall can be a very helpful drug to people who suffer from ADHD, it can also be quite harmful as well, especially to people who take it without having ADHD. Because Adderall is helpful when it comes to focusing, some people, who need to focus in their daily lives, take it without the need to. This is problematic because Adderall was designed for ONLY people who have ADHD, not for everyone. Unnecessarily taking Adderall is especially popular with students who are in high school or post secondary learning institutions. Adderall greatly increases the amount of time one can focus at once, and the quality of the focus. Therefore, illegal Adderall distribution and consumption is a problem, especially in high-end universities and colleges. Students, who have trouble focusing, or simply do not want to, may take Adderall to help them focus, when stuffing for a test or exam. In 2006 researches from the University of Kentucky found out that 34% of the people they interviewed admitted to illegal Adderall usage to help gain an edge in their classes. Additionally, an interview with one student, he said that Adderall not only increased the quality of his study time, but the quantity as well. He stated that he achieved the highest marks in his class and got perfect on his final exam, due to Adderall. The previous year when he hadn’t taken it, he did not achieve nearly as good results. Another study conduced by the University of Southern California stated that of the students they found taking illegal Adderall, 95% of them had simply faked the signs and symptoms in order to receive the prescription. With numbers like this it is clear that Adderall should be harder to get, and the diagnosis should be more thorough. Abuse and Problems If Adderall helps people with ADHD and helps people who don’t have it, isn’t it a good thing? It’s a win-win for everyone and higher test results for everyone. WRONG. Improper use of Adderall can lead to harsh side effects, which may all together counteract the improved studying. Just because it helps with studying doesn’t mean it helps with other aspects of your life as well. Improper Adderall use can lead to severe sleeping problems, including, not being able to fall asleep, not being able to stay asleep, and shortened REM cycles. This would definitely counteract better studying, and would take a toll on the body as well. Additionally, some other symptoms of Adderall abuse include: headaches, stomachaches, sweating, nausea, changes in sex drive, and as mentioned earlier, sleeping problems. Furthermore, with increased consumption of Adderall without a prescription can lead to: blurred vision, seizures, shaking limbs, and paralysis. With all these risks it is clear that Adderall is not a beneficial way to achieve higher test scores. Share this: Facebook Twitter Reddit LinkedIn WhatsApp

College San Mateo the Trade War Between China and The Usa Paper

College San Mateo the Trade War Between China and The Usa Paper.

I’m working on a Political Science writing question and need a sample draft to help me study.

I upload a outline for this position paper, please follow the outline to write a well done analysis essay about The trade war between China and the USA The final version will be graded on the strength of the analysis, the elegance of the writing, the conventions of grammar and punctuation, and adherence to a citation style. All papers must include the following four elements:1. IntroductionHere is where you to put it all together in a professional manner. What you wrote in your proposal can now be incorporated into the introduction of your proposal paper. The Introduction will also include a plan or roadmap for the paper. It is a chance for you to tell the reader what to expect.Your introduction must be at least 500 words.2. BodyThe body of your position paper is where you present your position and work through your arguments section by section. You may continue to draw materials from your position proposal, but remember to take your arguments further. The BODY of your position paper must be at least 2000 words.3. ConclusionThe conclusion of your position paper is where you summarize your arguments, backing up all that you assert with examples you have already discussed in the body of your paper.The CONCLUSION of your position paper must be at least 500 words.4. Works Citedyou may draw upon material from the ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY section of your research proposal.The WORKS CITED section of your position paper must be at least 500 words.
College San Mateo the Trade War Between China and The Usa Paper

Current Status Of SME Sector In Tanzania

i need help writing an essay This chapter describes the research setting. It is designed to give some useful background information about Tanzania, the country in which the study was conducted. The chapter begins by first providing general overview of geographical and economic features of Tanzania. Secondly, the chapter presents the historical overview of the entrepreneurship development in Tanzania. This is followed by the description of the SME sector and its role in economic development. Next in the chapter is a brief explanation of the organisations which support SME sector in Tanzania; this is followed with a presentation of an overview of manufacturing industry in Tanzania. Thereafter, the chapter provides an overview of the furniture sector and its role in employment and income generation. Finally, the chapter provides a brief overview of the four regions involved in this study. The country The United Republic of Tanzania was formed in 1964 following the union of Tanganyika (mainland) and Zanzibar (island). The country is located in the eastern side of the Africa continent liying between longitudes 29 and 40 degrees east and latitudes 1 and 11 degrees south. The country shares borders with eight countries, that is, Kenya and Uganda to the north; Rwanda and Burundi to the west; Zambia, Mozambique and Malawi to the south and Democratic republic of Congo to the north-west. Tanzania is the largest country in East Africa with a surface area of 945,000 square kilometres with a population of about 34 million people as per the 2002 national population census. The population distribution shows that about 77% of the total population lives in the rural areas while only 23% lives in the urban areas. The country has 26 regions of which 21 are from Tanzania mainland and 5 from the island of Zanzibar. Tanzania is blessed with various natural resources which include minerals, three great lakes (Victoria, Nyasa, Tanganyika), wildlife and other tourist attractions such as national parks (e.g. Serengeti, Ngorongoro, Manyara, Mikumi), mountains (e.g. Mt. Kilimanjaro, Mt. Meru, Uluguru and Udizungwa), craters (e.g. Ngorongoro) and the like. Economy Tanzania is still regarded as a developing country, with 36 percent of its population living below the poverty line (ITU 2004). The country’s economy is mainly based on agricultural sector, and it is estimated that 74% of Tanzanian people engages in agricultural sector. This sector is dominated by smallholder farmers which produce both food and cash crops and the majority of these farmers live in the rural areas. Accordingly, it is estimated that a large proportion (75%) of the export commodities come from agricultural sector (URT 2007) and as such agriculture is the highest foreign exchange earner. The major export crops include tobacco, sisal, cotton, tea, coffee and spices. Regarding the GDP growth, the statistics shows that Tanzanian GDP has been increasing from 7.1% in 2007 to 7.4% in 2008. Furthermore, the statistics from the Tanzania National Bureau of Statistics shows that three sectors namely agricultural, service and manufacturing have been the major source of the GDP growth in 2008 (see Table 1). Table 1: Contribution to GDP by Sectors – 2008 Sector % Contribution to GDP Agriculture, forestry and Hunting 28 Service 47.7 Manufacturing 22.9 Fishing 1.3 Culture In Tanzania, there are over 120 different indigenous ethnic groups. Some of these have up to a few million people, whereas many others comprise smaller numbers of members (Olomi 2001). For example, Asians and Arabs constitute about 1% of the total population. In order to discourage ethnic sentiments, which seemed to loom large, the government instituted several measures, the most effective of which is the adoption and development of Kiswahili as the first official language and medium of instruction in primary schools. Additionally, in 1990’s there has been an increase in ethnic integration through inter-ethnic marriages. Despite these measures, ethnic groups continue to maintain distinct subs-cultures and group identities, meaning that there is a very big cultural diversity in the country. For example, ethnic sentiments can be still maintained in Asians and Arab people. Furthermore, the dominant religions are Christianity and Islam, each of which comprises about a third of the population while Atheists, Hindu and other small religious groups account for the remaining percentage of the population. The cultural symbol in Tanzania encourages conformist behaviour whereby respect for seniority and authority is strictly observed. In fact, children are inculcated with conformist ideal right early childhood through to school going age. They are always trained to obey and respect people who are older than themselves. In fact children are constantly reminded that their success in almost anything can only be a product of this type of behaviour (Nchimbi 2002). Additionally, most of the African countries and Tanzania in particular have been known for pinning down every success or failure on the work God. As a result, most of the people would use this anecdote as a convenient excuse of taking full responsibility for their actions. As for the entrepreneurship culture, this is the aspect which is generally under-developed in Tanzania (Olomi 2001). This can largely be attributed to historical and political reasons associated with colonialism and socialism respectively. For example, during the colonial era there were deliberate efforts in restricting the participation of indigenous Africans in business activities. In fact, the participation of indigenous Africans in business was limited to ownership of very small enterprises such as tiny shops whereas Arabs were allowed to operate as retailers only, and Asians as medium wholesalers and retailers (Rugumamu and Mutagwaba 1999). Nevertheless, the business community of the Asian origin is still most entrepreneurial active and successful in Tanzania (Finseth 1998). With regards to indigenous people, it is the Chaga people from Kilimanjaro region who are significantly overrepresented in the entrepreneurial arena across the country. SME sector in Tanzania As briefly discussed in Chapter One, the SME sector is an outcome of the structural adjustment policy rather than of a design. It is amongst the products of the failure of African socialism which led to the economic crisis of the 1970s and the early 1980s. Within this political framework, private business sector was actively discouraged in favour of public enterprises which were government owned, community based, or cooperative owned ventures. Accordingly, the regulation was introduced to restrict civil servants and leaders of the ruling party from engaging in business activities. Since almost all educated people were members of the civil service then it is obvious then that business activities were left to people who had no education at all. Further, this African socialism policy was based on the top down approach in decision making and in fact the Government was the only organ which made all the decisions for its citizen, including on such maters as who should go to which school or college, who should work where one should work and live, how much one should earn in terms of wages etc. The reliance on Government discretion in decision making decisions has resulted into a culture of dependency on government and unquestioning obedience among most Tanzanian people. In fact this approach have contributed to the stifling of development of entrepreneurial values such as the need for achievement, personal initiatives and or creativity, willingness to take risks and related behaviours (Olomi 2001). The socialism approach recorded marked achievement in social development in the 1970s and early 1980’s especially in primary education, health services delivery as well as water supply and sanitation (Temu and Due 2000). However, the nationalisation of the private sector led to poor economy marked by a number of macro-economic imbalances, and consequently an economic crisis that lasted for over a decade (Kanaan 2000). This crisis has also led to the erosion of real purchasing power among the salaried people. Thus Tanzanian people were forced to establish small business augment their meagre incomes. For instance, some of the people engaged themselves in dubious activities such as smuggling goods from neighbouring countries and sell them at premium prices in Tanzania. These kinds of businesses were against the government’s policies that considered such businesses as being in conflict with the country’s ideology (Maliyamkono and Bagachwa 1990). Succumbing to pressure from the World Bank, Tanzanian Government changed its policy from state led economy to a market driven economy. In fact, the final reform took place in 1991 leading to privatisation of most public enterprises as a result. The privatisation of state enterprises and the disengagement of the government from some activities resulted into the retrenchment of workers from the public sector and, as a result, most of these workers turned to micro enterprises for survival. In light of the above experience, the SME sector has recently become a very significant agenda in the Tanzanian economy. Indeed, it is well accepted that the SMEs sector has an important role to play in income and employment generation. Having explained the development of SME sector in Tanzania, the section below defines SME according to Tanzanian definition, this is followed with a review of the current status and problems of SMEs in Tanzania. Definition of SME There is no universally accepted definition of SME. Different countries define SME differently depending on their level of development. However, the commonly used criteria in the definition include the total number of employees, the total investment and sales turnover. Thus, the Tanzanian Government defines SMEs according to sector, employment size, and capital invested in machinery. Accordingly, in the context of Tanzania SMEs are defined as micro, small and medium size enterprises in non farm activities which include manufacturing, mining, commerce and services. A micro enterprise is defined as a firm with fewer than five employees whereas a small firm is a firm with 5 to 49 employees, a medium enterprises is a firm with 50 to 99 employees. Any firm with 100 employees or more is regarded as a large enterprise (see Table 2) below for detailed demonstration). In the case where an enterprise falls under more than one category then the level of investment would be the deciding factor. Table 2 Category Employees Capital invested in machinery Micro enterprise 1-4 employees Up to 5 million Small enterprise 5-49 employees 5-200 million Medium enterprise 50-99 employees 200-800 million Large enterprise 100 and above Above 800 million Current Status of SME sector in Tanzania Despite the importance of the SME sector in economic development, it is difficult to get recent and reliable data regarding the current status of SME sector in Tanzania. From the expert interviews conducted by the researcher in the current study, it has been discovered that SME sector is dominated by micro and small enterprises despite that the available data to support this observation are rather sketchy and unreliable. Additionally, it is estimated that there are approximately 2.7 million enterprises in the country, out of which about 60% are located in the urban areas. The majority (98%) of these are micro enterprises (employing less than five people). Therefore, medium and large enterprises in the economy are extremely few. Most (66%) of the micro and small enterprises have an annual turnover of less than US $2,000 and have been established as a survival strategy. Moreover, the estimates show that there are about 700,000 new entrants into the labour force every year. About 500,000 of these are school leavers with few marketing and entrepreneurial skills. The public sector employs only about 40,000 of the new entrants into the labour market, leaving about 660,000 to join the unemployed or the underemployed army reserve. Most of these people end up in the SME sector, and especially in the informal sector. The survival rate of these emerging SMEs is also low; over 60% survive only the first five years of operation. Although SMEs are found in all sectors of the economy, they are dominant in trade (54%) followed by services (34%) (URT 2003). This is because the SME sectors as identified above require minimum capital and requirement for some one to start a business of this kind. Problems faced by SME in Tanzania Despite its contributions to income and employment creation, generally SMEs in Tanzania are currently faced with a lot of problems (Bagachwa, Harris, and Tinios 1993; (Verspreet and Berlange 1998; (Calcopietro and Massawe 1999; Ziorklui 2001; . In determining barriers to SMEs growth, rural program on Enterprise Development (RPED) surveys found two levels of constraints facing SMEs in Tanzania: those acting as barriers to general operations and those impeding growth. The report concludes with a list of factors impeding the development of SMEs as follows, Lack of access to credit, Low education level of entrepreneurs, The lack of managerial, marketing and production skills, and Regulatory constraints stemming from the difficulty of obtaining legal status. (Calcopietro and Massawe 1999) classify the factors hindering SMEs development in Tanzania into five categories namely; macro-economic and policy environment, physical and technological infrastructure, the banking and finance structure, legal and regulatory framework, and market conditions. This undesirable situation has persisted for a long time despite the existence of various programs aimed at developing SME sector. As (Olomi 2006) notes, institutions and associations supporting SMEs are weak; their services are quite basic and mainly focus on helping the poor to survive. As a result, there are variations in performance among SME; whereas some are growing others have permanently remained micro or informal without any marked growth. In Africa, this phenomenon is referred to as the “missing middle” and continues to be a long-term concern for African policy makers (Kibera and Kibera 1997). Organizations supporting SME in Tanzania Due to the recognition of the importance of SME to the country’s economy, Tanzania Government has continued to design several programmes and institutions which aimed at supporting the development of SME sector, these include- Small Industries Development Organisation (SIDO). This was established in 1973 by the Act of Parliament to plan, coordinate, promote and offer every form of service to small industries. This is a main government arm for promoting SMEs in Tanzania. Some of the things SIDO have achieved include: Establishment of 10 training-cum-production centres that offer simple rural based technologies; Introduction of hire purchase programs through which more than 2000 entrepreneurs were assisted with machines and working tools; Setting up of regional extension services offices that render advice on setting up of new industries, choice of technology, preparation of feasibility studies, preparation of economic surveys, installation, operation of machinery, maintenance and marketing of products; and Conducting training programme in Management, Financial and Marketing skills. Currently, SIDO is focused much on conducting training programmes; however, since the SME baseline survey which was conducted in 1991; there has never been any other survey SIDO to date. This is attributed to lack of funds for the researcher to conduct the survey study in all the regions. Despite the achievements and weakness mentioned above, SIDO in collaboration with other stakeholders have continued to support the establishment of SME associations to empower individuals in the private sector. Some of these associations include Tanzania Food Processors Association (TAFOPA), and Tanzania Small Industries Organisation (TASISO). These associations have been useful in involving the members in all issues related to accessibility to markets, information flow, raw material, packaging and micro credit services. However, these organisations are mainly located in Dar es Salaam, which makes it impossible for the entrepreneurs in the upcountry to benefit from the services rendered by these associations, such as access to information. Ministry of Industry, Trade and Marketing Recently, the Ministry of Industry and Trade established the SMEs Department; this department focuses on promoting the growth of SMEs in Tanzania. This department is in its infant stage, so it is still gathering information about SME. The main goal for this move is to have a centre for database for SME and other duties which would be commissioned by the Government. Thus, no data were found in this department. Private organisations Apart from organisations mentioned above, institutions in the private sector such as Tanzania Chamber of Commerce Industry and Agriculture (TCCIA) and Confederation of Tanzanian Industry (CTI) are also supporting SME development. These institutions are actively encouraging, promoting membership, and ensuring that the organisations are adequately financed through member fees and donor-sponsored programmes aimed at strengthened the private sector. For instance, there is an office at the CTI which deals with SMEs problems and services. In this regard in 1999, CTI conducted a study with the aim of identifying major problems and concerns of SME in Tanzania. Twenty-seven major constraints were listed by SMEs and to date some of the constraints have been addressed. . However, the outreach CTI services are still limited because having Dar es Salaam as their center of attention. University of Dar es Salaam Entrepreneurship centre (UDEC) The Faculty of Commerce of the University of Dar es Salaam established UDEC in 2001. The Centre provides consultancy and training in SME related issues. Currently, the centre has established the incubator whereby graduate entrepreneurs and other managers/owner of businesses can be trained on entrepreneurship and related issues. Moreover, UDEC in collaboration with Business in Development Network Foundation (BiDNF) of the Netherlands and other local partners launched a business plan competition on 11th April 2007. The initiative aimed at stimulating Tanzanian of all occupations to identify and develop creative ideas which have some impact on development. These Tanzanians are supported in developing bankable business plans and being linked with local and international financiers. The best 25 business planners would be linked to business professionals for the purposes of improving these plans to the level of sustainable enterprise ideas. Government/donor joint efforts Joint Government and donors support institutions have been established also to support enterprise development in Tanzania. During expert interviews the current research visited various institutions as explained below. MKURABITA This program dwells with Tanzania’s property and business formalization, which is popularly known by its Kiswahili acronym MKURABITA. This programme helps people who want to formalise their property or business, to do so. The main purpose of the programme is to empower the majority in the informal sector so that they can make better use of their property and business assets and take advantage of other opportunities in the modern market economy. The idea behind this initiative is that many poor people do actually possess wealth in the form of land and small businesses, but because they have no title deeds to their land, or because they operate unregistered business, they either have little access to capital or are unable to expand their economic activities beyond their own local areas. If these businesses or assets are formalised, it would be easier for them to secure loans from financial institutions. Currently, a small Programme Management Unit under the President’s Office manages MKURABITA. Business Environment Strengthening in Tanzania (BEST) This programme aims at strengthening the business environment in Tanzania by firstly, reducing the burden on businesses through removing regulatory and administrative constraints, and secondly through improving quality of the services provided by the Government to the private sector, including commercial dispute resolutions. As noted earlier, private sector in Tanzania has been earmarked as the engine for economic growth therefore strengthening business environment is among the priority areas in Tanzania. Among the key enabling factors to a strengthened business environment is good regulatory environment. The BEST Programme is therefore instrumental in achieving this objective, and is designed to provide businesses with the enabling environment they need, and thereby enhancing economic growth and achieving rapid poverty reduction In summary, several organisations support SME development though they are poorly co-ordinated and lack the necessary coverage to reach all the sectors of the small business community. This is because most of these organisations have their attention focused to (and are located in) Dar es Salaam. Additionally, most of the projects funded by donors (e.g. BEST and MKURABITA) are more focusing on legal and regulatory framework and overlooking the fact that there are other factors surrounding the existence of SMEs, which need more attention as well. Nevertheless, it is obvious that since the Government took the initiatives of developing the private sector, the sector has grown in terms of number of businesses established, capital and employees. SMEs have contributed considerably to the growing GDP and in creating employment opportunities to the Tanzania people. However, there is no recent comprehensive information on the performance of SMEs in Tanzania. The survey study done by Wangwe in 1999 summarizes the contributions of SME to Tanzanian economy as follows: That they are estimated to contribute 30-35% of the gross domestic product (GDP) They create jobs for 20% to 30% of the total labour force. They temporarily mobilize unused resources such as land, capital, labour and management skills that would have remained idle. The sector is an important source of income for those whose real wages and salaries are falling in the formal sector. The sector has become the largest urban job provider and shows the highest employment growth rates which is estimated at 10% per year. The recent available information is from the 2004 Investment Climate Assessment, which was based on the firm’s level survey data covering about 480 firms, 276 from the manufacturing sector in the woodworks, furniture, textile and garments, leather, construction materials, paper and publishing, chemicals and paint, plastics and agribusiness sub-sector. The study reveals that SMEs sector is growing fast in recent years as compared to the rate of growth in the early 1990’s. . An overview of manufacturing industry Manufacturing industry in Tanzania consists of a number of activities as seen in Table 3. Most of these sectors deal with production of goods and services that are used as end products or as inputs in other production processes. This sector has a very important role in Tanzania’s economy. Although the data to support this observation are not up to date but the statistics taken in 2000 suggests that about 48% of the total monthly wage earners are employed in this sector. Accordingly, this sector remains among the major contributor of the Tanzanian GDP, as we have seen in table 1 that the sector is currently the third most important to the Tanzanian economy. Further, its contribution to GDP increased from 9% in 2006 to 9.2% in 2007 (URT 2007). Despite its importance to the country’s economy, manufacturing activities in Tanzania are relatively small with most activities concentrating on manufacture of simple consumer goods such as food, beverages, tobacco, textiles, furniture, and wood related products. Business survey in Tanzania mainland done by Tanzania national bureau of statistics reveals that three sectors (textiles, food products and beverages, furniture and manufacturing) have the highest proportions of business activities as seen in table below. Table 3 Number and Percentage Distribution of Businesses in Manufacturing Industry by Activity, Tanzania Mainland Activity Business Number Percentage Wearing Apparel; Dressing and Dyeing of Fur 6,584 42.1 Food Products and Beverage 4,728 30.3 Furniture; Manufacturing 2,905 18.6 Fabricated Metal Products, Except Mach.

Can you help me with this assignment of Hybrid Cars?

Can you help me with this assignment of Hybrid Cars?.

Hybrid Car Research PaperA hybrid car is a motor vehicle that uses two or more different sources of power. In most hybrids, you will find an internal combustion engine in addition to an electrical motor. Depending on how the vehicle is driven and the availability of power, the car uses gasoline and battery power alternately.In this assignment, you will research five different hybrid cars and evaluate their impact on the environment.Using the readings for this module, the Argosy University online library resources, and the Internet, do the following:Identify the top five most popular choices of hybrid cars. Analyze the advantages and disadvantages of each car’s technology, price, manufacturing, and impact on environment. Include the scientific principles involved in the technology.Determine which type of car would work best for you and your family. Justify your decision based on your analysis of the five hybrid cars.Explain the impact these cars will have on the United States’ economy. Consider the following issues in your analysis: consumer buying, sustainability, recycling, and fuel economy.Evaluate the impact that hybrid-car technology has had or could have on the United States’ political relationships with oil-producing countries. Be sure to include an analysis of economic issues such as production, supply, and trade.Describe how this technology will influence world politics. Include an analysis of economic issues such as production, supply, and trade.Support your statements with examples. Use a minimum of six reliable references, two of which should be peer-reviewed articles.Write a 4–6-page paper in Word format. Apply APA standards to citation of sources.With no plagiarism in Turnitin. Must be a clean paper.
Can you help me with this assignment of Hybrid Cars?

DWCU Should Precautionary Principle Become Part of National & International Law Essay

DWCU Should Precautionary Principle Become Part of National & International Law Essay.

Your post should be about “1 page long”. I know the discussion board doesn’t track pages, but the length I am looking for is equal to 1 page in MS Word, double spaced.After you make your post you can see other people’s posts and you need to reply to at least 2 threads, but you can reply as much as you want.Be respectful and don’t criticize other student’s opinions. If you disagree, please give your opinion and what makes you feel that way: facts, experiences, beliefs, etc.I recognize that may be hard to take a side sometimes, and I am not requiring every student to make up their mind after 2 articles and a few lectures… BUT for these discussion board assignments you are supposed to pick a side to argue. If you truely cannot make up your mind, you can open with something like “I was not able to fully make up my mind on this topic, it is a really tough one, but for this assignment I will argue xxxxx.” and then argue that side for the post. (Please don’t do this every week)In jobs you, especially higher level jobs, you are often asked to present arguments or stances that you may disagree with, but you have to follow through because it is the stance of your boss or your company… this is good practice!
DWCU Should Precautionary Principle Become Part of National & International Law Essay