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Gender Differences Emotional Intelligence Psychology Essay

Gender Differences Emotional Intelligence Psychology Essay. Stanley Schachter and Jerome Singer:Two-Factor Theory of Emotion.According to Aronson, Wilson and Akert (2010) this theory explained that emotional experience is the result of a two-step self-perception process where people met their first experience on physiological arousal and then searching for an appropriate explanation for it. Other people may understand their emotion through observing the bodily state. Take an example, Jane felt aroused but she is not sure what the real reason is. She labeled that she is aroused by observing her own bodily state such as sweating, shaky hands and heartbeat increases. Then, she continues to look for the environmental cues to explain her own arousal and after that she found out that it is tomorrow’s examination that makes her feeling nervous. Thus, the two-factor theory can make people understand their own emotion even well with appropriate reason. Salovey and Mayer: Ability Model. This theory defined emotional intelligence as the individual’s ability to perceive, use, understand and manage their emotions. This model is focusing on emotional abilities that can be built through our daily activities such as learning and experiencing (Fernandez-Berroca et al., 2005). According to Fiori and Antonakis (2010), Salovey and Mayer worked together with Caruso to create a test named Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) to measure the emotional intelligence ability. They are focusing on 4 different branches which are emotion perception, emotion integration, emotion understanding, and emotion management. Figure 2.1 shows an illustration of the simplified Salovey and Mayer Ability Model of Emotional intelligence which is adapted from Lim (2011). Figure 2.1: Mayer and Salovey’s Four Branch Model of Emotional Intelligence Bandura: Social-Learning Theory, explained the idea that we learning social behavior such as aggression by observing others and imitating them (Aronson, WilsonGender Differences Emotional Intelligence Psychology Essay

Polly Stenham on Playwriting Structure Discussion

Polly Stenham on Playwriting Structure Discussion.

Student is getting us Chapter 3. Hard deadline!All Assignment Journals will have three sections. “Things to Watch”, “Things to Read” and “Responses”. You will be asked to to copy and paste the response prompts into a word document and then upload that documrnt here. Capisce?Things to Watch:Independent Lens | Playwright | On Being a Playwright: Rajiv Joseph and Tarell McCraney | PBSHow to write a play – five golden rulesPlaywriting: StructurePlaywriting: Structurehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPWdwTNjOUUhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9ucWkyTrVMThings to Read:Barton Ch 3Responses:What are the elements that make up a good play?Traditionally Comedy=_____________ and Tragedy = __________________.What are some things that help make the characters in a play 3 dimensional?Apply the plot diagram discussed in the video by RTHS Ian Finley to a favorite episode of a program you like. Identify the Inciting incident, Climax, Protagonist and MDQMultiple artists over the course of this semester will talk about how important it is to let go of good ideas that don’t serve the story. This is an idea that is often referred to as “Killing Your Darlings: How does Polly Stenham refer to this idea
Polly Stenham on Playwriting Structure Discussion

Magic Methyl Effect: Transition Metal Catalyzed

research paper help The insertion of a methyl group, the smallest alkyl group, into a C-H bond has been shown to enhance such pharmacological charactistics as bioavailability and potency.1 Traditionally, incorporation of a methyl group into a bioactive compound has required lengthy de novo synthesis. Consequently, synthetic reactions that allow late-stage installation of methyl groups into advanced intermediates are of great potential value in the pharmaceutical industry. In the past two decades interest in directed C−H activation followed by the methylation led to the development of strategies which use precious metals catalysts forarenes ortho-functionalizations.2, 3 Currently, only a few reactions exist which enable such transformations to be achieved in a single step,1, 4 highlighting the difficulty in converting a C-H bond to C-Me bond. Most of these methods require heavy loadings of precious metal catalysts to obtain the desired methylated product (Scheme 1).4 Moreover, some of them use hazardous and toxic methylating reagents1 with strongly basic reaction media what results in a limited scope1,4 and the uncontrolled formation of both mono- and dimethylated products.2 This reflects the need for new methylation methods which will overcome mentioned limitations. Scheme 1. Ortho-methylation with precious metal To address the toxicity and expense of the precious metal catalysis, first row metal-catalyzed C−H functionalization has recently been recognized as a straightforward and a powerful tool for the formation of Csp2– Csp3 bonds in modern organic synthesis. In addition first row transition metals introduce interesting mechanistic possibilities for ortho-methylation; they are readily available and relatively low toxicity.1, 4 Recently Lu and co-workers reported the cobalt (II)-catalyzed direct C-H methylation of unactivated (hetero)arenes using dicumyl peroxide (DCP) as the methyl source, base and most importantly as an oxidant. Cobalt mediated C-H functionalization is a maturing field; however, there exist only two examples of its application to methylation of aromatics, using N-methyl-1-naphthamide and benzo[h]quinolone substrates respectively. The reaction proved to be mild, functional group tolerant and uses a less toxic methylating reagent. The paper reports effective access to a range of ortho-methylated (hetero)aromatic carboxamides (Scheme 2).5 Scheme 2. Ortho-methylation with cobalt catalysts Chatani and co-workers reported the use of aryltrimethylammonium bromide and iodide as new methylating reagents in conjunction with nickel-catalyzed C-H bond activation (Scheme 3). Changing from a palladium6 catalyst to nickel makes the ammonium salt act as a methyl source rather than aryl source for a range of 8-aminoquinoline aryl amides. Unfortunately harsh conditions make it difficult to control the selectivity between mono- and dimethylation at the ortho positions in some cases.7 Scheme 3. Ortho-methylation with nickel catalyst using aryltrimethylammonium iodide as methylating reagent Nakamura and co-workers have reported two separate iron-catalyzed conditions seemingly solving a lot of issues associated with the previous examples. The direct C-H methylation reaction with a picolinoyl or 8-aminoquinolyl directing groups, an iron/diphospine catalyst, and inexpensive 2,3-dichlorobutane as an oxidant furnished an efficient, robust reaction (Scheme 4).8 Unfortunately the method relies upon superstoichiometric methyl equivalents in the form of the pyrophoric trimethylaluminum. Scheme 4. Ortho-methylation with iron catalyst using trimethylaluminum as methyl source Nakamura and co-workers further optimized the iron-catalyzed C-H methylation reaction by screening ligands.9 The tridentate phosphine ligand NMe2-TP in combination with Fe(acac)3 catalyzed the ortho C-H methylation of simple aromatic carbonyl compounds without requiring additional directing groups. This reaction showed wide substrate generality, functional group tolerance, and resistance to catalytic poisons taking advantage of functional groups inherent to the advanced intermediates (Scheme 4).9 This seminar will discuss the scope and limitations of these recently published methods, and assess the progress towards developing general solutions to the challenge of late-stage methyl incorporation. References: Schönherr H., Cernak T. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 12256 Lyons T. W., Sanford M. S. Chem. Rev. 2010, 110, 1147 Snieckus V. Chem. Rev. 1990, 90, 879 Yan G., Borah A. J., Wang L. and Yanga M. Adv. Synth. Catal. 2015, 357, 1333 Li Q., Li Y., Hu W., Hu R., Li G. and Lu H. Chem. Eur. J. 2016, 22, 12286 Zhu F., Tao J.-L., Wang Z.-X. Org. Lett. 2015, 17, 4926 Uemura T., Yamaguchi M., and Chatani N. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, 128, 3214 Shang R., Ilies L, and Nakamura E. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 7660 Shang R., Ilies L. and Nakamura E. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 10132

Instructions Connecting devices to each other and to other networks is an essential skill to have for communication. The purpose of this assignment is to create a document that explains how to connect your devices using various wired and wireless technolo

Instructions Connecting devices to each other and to other networks is an essential skill to have for communication. The purpose of this assignment is to create a document that explains how to connect your devices using various wired and wireless technolo. I need an explanation for this Computer Science question to help me study.

Instructions

Connecting devices to each other and to other networks is an essential skill to have for communication. The purpose of this assignment is to create a document that explains how to connect your devices using various wired and wireless technology. Download and Open the Assignment instructions for W6: Technology Assignment A

Instructions

Download and Open the Assignment instructions for W6: Chapters 10-11 Terms Assignment

Instructions

Databases are the primary storage location for information as they are very efficient at storing, retrieving and updating the data stored within them. Being able to use this tool saves time by organizing information in a structural manner. The purpose of this assignment is to create a database, store information in the DB, and create queries to view the information stored. Download and Open the Assignment instructions for W6: Technology Assignment B

Instructions Connecting devices to each other and to other networks is an essential skill to have for communication. The purpose of this assignment is to create a document that explains how to connect your devices using various wired and wireless technolo

US History exam

US History exam.

Review Questions below I can also provide readings and videosthe test will be on canvas What is meant by imperialism, mercantilism, bullionism, and Social Darwinism? What were the causes, specifics, and results of the Spanish-American War? Identify Alfred Mahan.2. What was the agenda of progressives? Identify “environmentalism” and Muller v. Oregon. What are referendums, recall, and initiatives? Did progressives enhance or reduce the executive branch’s authority? Who was Robert LaFollette, and what were the 1906 Railway Hours Act and the 17th Amendment?3. How did Theodore Roosevelt interpret the role of president? What is meant by “stewardship” and “the bully pulpit?” In what ways was Roosevelt unlike other presidents? Discuss “Teddy the Trustbuster,” The Jungle, and the 1902 coal strike. Be sure you know lots of details about John Muir, Teddy Roosevelt, Gifford Pinchot, conservation, and national parks.4. How did trusts fare during Taft’s administration? What was the Ballinger-Pinchot Affair?5. Who won the 1912 election? Be sure to identify candidates and parties.6. How did Woodrow Wilson try to counter the Triple Wall of Privilege?7. xplain the following foreign policies of Theodore Roosevelt: “the Roosevelt Corollary” and “walk softly and carry a big stick.” Identify “The Open Door Notes,” and explain China’s boycott.8. What prompted the U.S. to make the Panama Canal, and what country tried to thwart this? Describe “the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty.”9. How did the U.S. feel about the Russo-Japanese War? Why did Theodore Roosevelt earn the Nobel Peace Prize?10. Explain the European causes of World War I. Identify the Triple Alliance, the Triple Entente, the Allied Powers, the Central Powers, and Franz Ferdinand.11. How did the U.S. feel about the war before we became belligerents? What prompted us to declare war on the Germans in 1917? Discuss the LUSITANIA, “the SUSSEX Pledge,” “the Zimmerman Telegram,” and the impact of Russia’s March, 1917 revolution. What are “The Fourteen Points?”12. How did the U.S. motivate and control Americans during World War I? Identify the War Industries Board, the Committee on Public Information, Herbert Hoover, and “the cult of conformity.”What were the main points of the Versailles Treaty, and why wouldn’t the American Senate approve the treaty?13. Discuss the following themes of the 1920’s, and identify the topics that accompany them: Prohibition (18th Amendment, 21st Amendment, issues discussed in “Demon Rum”), “the Red Scare” (“Palmer raids,” Sacco and Vanzetti), question of evolution (John Scopes, William Bryan, and Clarence Darrow), women’s suffrage (19th Amendment), and 1920’s presidents.14 .Identify and explain the causes and results of the Great Depression. How did President Hoover deal with the event? Discuss Roosevelt’s victory in 1932, and “the New Deal.” Identify the National Recovery Administration, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Works Progress Administration, the Agricultural Adjustment Act, the Civilian Conservation Corps, and the Social Security Act and Huey Long. Identify Father Coughlin. How successful was the New Deal?
US History exam