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Film Piracy and It’s Effects in the Industry “essay help” site:edu Communications and Media homework help

Film Piracy and its effect on the Industry Five Advantages of Film Piracy: These are the “advantages” one might see for why to commit film piracy, but I by know way endorse such a thing. •You can save money •Sometimes one may have the advantage of seeing a film before it is released on DVD •It’s been made a lot easier to get ahold of pirated films and can usually be downloaded in minutes •one can peer-to-peer share with friends •One might see it as free publicity for the film Five Disadvantages of Film Piracy: Film Piracy is the unauthorized use or reproduction of movies in print, videos, DVD, or electronic files by uploading or downloading; an upload is when a person sends or makes available a file; a download is when a person receives a file. • Piracy is in fact stealing, it’s a criminal act. •When film piracy is committed the revenues for the film industry in decreases. •It can affect the number of films being produced. •One can be ARRESTED for such copyright theft. • If piracy threatens the movie industry at all, it is a threat that is of the motion picture industry’s making.

The movie industry says movie piracy, AKA bootlegs, threatens its ability to survive. The movie industry also moans about the loss of profits to bootlegs and online filesharing. Their estimates are flawed because they do not take in to account one factor which is those who do without. Any article on how piracy threatens the move industry should deal with that fact. Just because someone sees a movie online or buys a cheap bootleg does not mean the movie industry has been cheated out of an admission fee.

The admission fee where I live is $12 for me alone. If I don’t see a movie online or by a bootleg, I simply don’t see it at all. It is not a matter of wanting to watch a movie on my TV or my computer. I love seeing movies in the theatre, but I can’t afford it. It is that simple. It is not a matter of morality. It is a question of being locked out of the cinema or not because I don’t have enough money. I’m not the only one at the mercy of that simple equation. The movie industry is quite plainly only threatened in the slightest by movie piracy.

You will still get those that will tell you the price is what the market will bear. Okay then, so what is the problem? Why is the movie industry whining about all these losses? If the market bears the price as they say it does there should be no problem. There wouldn’t be one if movie theatre admissions were priced the same as counterfeit DVDs which tend to go for between $3 and $5. If you offer me a movie at $3 I will still think that is expensive but it is at very least negotiable depending very much on how my financial situation is at the time.

But charge me $12 to see a film? Forget it. We have absolutely nothing to talk about. We are talking about a difference of between $7 and $9 per title and that is only if it is admission for one. A significant difference in price? For me absolutely. For most of the people I know too. Maybe people in Hollywood are passed fussing about sums of money under $10. But the rest of us are not. Let us take the example of a movie like 2012. Top of the box office its first week with a gross of $65 million.

Estimated cost of production $260,000,000. Do you really suppose that anyone amongst the production team of that film has even blinked at sums of money under $10 in the past few years? This movie industry campaign with its slick commercials that equate movie piracy with all kinds of thievery like purse snatching etc elicits laughs or groans and eye-rolling if it gets any reaction at all that I have seen from audiences. How piracy threatens the move industry is a matter of proportion.

It siphons off enough money to make producing stupid commercials (which you can’t just click “Menu” on your DVD player to avoid) necessary. But the industry still makes money hand over fist even in tough economic times like these. Hollywood film executives and their flunkies are either on some very powerful drugs or they are just naturally delusional if they think their selfish whining makes a substantial number of people who watch pirated movies feel guilty. I wonder if this is really Hollywood’s way of two-tiered marketing.

Supply movie theatres with blockbuster releases and make huge profits at concession stands as well as the box office then market bootlegs (Yes, I am asking aloud if they might be in on it) to the people who cannot afford to enjoy the deluxe movie experience. •They look at us as losers, a negligible group on the margins of society and would rather we be kept out of their shiny cineplexes, lest our BO offend the other patrons or we try to pester them for spare change. Piracy is a thorny issue in the Philippines.

I think very few here can be holier-than-thou and say they haven’t bought a pirated game, bootleg DVD or other counterfeit good at some point. Yet most of us agree that piracy is a crime. Read my Infotech article “Game piracy may be financing other crimes: ESA exec,” based on my e-mail interview with Ric Hirsch, senior vice president for intellectual property enforcement of the Entertainment Software Association. ESA is the US industry association representing the world’s biggest game publishers, and is the owner and operator of Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3).

I’ve already gotten feedback from those who feel it’s absurd to link game piracy to organized crime. I think this really shows how we as consumers see piracy in terms mainly of getting a bargain, and that most of us think it’s a victimless crime. But have we ever stopped to think about the economic scale of the operations that bring these bootleg products to the hands of our friendly neighborhood pirates? A reader e-mailed me about this article, saying he was an IT consultant who buys pirated games in order to “evaluate” them, so that he can buy the original copies if he likes the games.

He feels that it’s absurd of the ESA to allege that proceeds from game piracy could be funding other criminal activities like drug smuggling or even terrorism. But I think what he fails to consider is that piracy is an international crime, a global phenomenon. It’s a very profitable criminal enterprise, and while it’s absurd to think that every individual pirate is directly involved with drug or arms smugglers, what the ESA and law enforcement agencies are saying is that the big syndicates mass-producing and shipping pirated games all over the world are also involved in other crimes, including drugs and terrorism in some countries.

And since no one will sell these products if no one is buying them, we as consumers are also part of this food chain. Here’s part of my reply to this reader: I think most of us agree that it (piracy) is a crime, and that if we ourselves own a form of intellectual property (for instance, our game developers, or IT programmers, or we journalists), we wouldn’t want others to rip us off and use our products illegally. You might think what Hirsch is saying is absurd, but think about it: Piracy is a very big business all over the world.

We are talking about syndicates investing a huge amount of money in machinery, regularly bribing Customs personnel and other government officials, and shipping their products to different international markets. Is it really that farfetched to think that the syndicates in Malaysia, China, Russia and other major producers of pirated games are also involved in other illegal activities like drug and arms smuggling? The Philippines might be more of a consumer rather than a manufacturer of pirated games, but the criminals who bring these goods in illegally and make them available to retailers wouldn’t be doing this if piracy wasn’t a big business.

That’s what Hirsch is saying, that as consumers we might only think of buying pirated goods in terms of getting a bargain, but actually we’re part of a food chain that is by itself a large-scale criminal enterprise and conceivably funds other illegal activities. And if we want to support Filipino game developers, then we must also stop condoning piracy. Piracy is partly what did in Anito: Defend a Land Enraged, and it’s cold comfort for our Filipino game developers to get international awards and praises for their games when they’re being robbed of their hard-earned money.

If you’d like to read more on the subject, a number of articles about the links [between] software piracy and organized crime have come out over the years, some of which include: Software Piracy Report: Part II http://archive. gamespy. com/legacy/articles/spr2_c. shtm The Impact of Counterfeit Software http://www. pcmag. com/article2/0,1759,1061752,00. asp Again, I’m not going to be a hypocrite. Piracy has made games, movies, music and other goods affordable to more Filipinos.

But if we want to become producers of original Filipino games instead of just being consumers, then we have to start supporting our game developers. But look what’s happening. Our knowledge workers are trying to produce original Filipino content, but the public would rather keep getting things for free or almost free. Pati Anito pinirata. Pati OPM pinipirata. Pati Filipino movies pinipirata. I don’t really have the answers, because I know most of this is based on economics, and that piracy is a cheap alternative for most Filipinos.

But I dream of the day when the Philippines will also become a world-class game development center, when our talented game designers and programmers can earn a decent living in this country and compete with the world’s best without having to leave the Philippines. I dream of the day when the Philippines will become a major market for international game publishers, with companies like Electronic Arts investing in the country and putting up actual Philippine subsidiaries. I dream of the day when Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo will actually launch heir consoles in the Philippines, instead of us having to get our units through the gray market. Heck, we don’t even have Xbox Live legally in the Philippines. Sure, you might say it’s an impossible dream, and the current woeful state of the Philippine game development industry is just part of the overall pitiful state of our country. But at some point we’ll have to wake up and realize that we can’t be consumers forever — and even then we’re already too small a market of consumers to begin with and we just buy pirated goods anyway, so why the heck should foreign companies invest in our country?

It’s not like we’re China, which, like it or not, has been able to get away with piracy because of the sheer size of its market and its investment on infrastructure, local manufacturers, game developers and other homegrown industries. Not to mention that it’s a military superpower, so hey, it’s not like we can complain about how unfair it is to pick on a Third World country like the Philippines when other countries are the ones producing pirated goods. What we have to realize is that we have to develop a competitive advantage as a nation — not just talented individuals who more often than not end up migrating to other countries.

We have to stop this endless cycle of thinking that it’s OK for people to break laws because they’re poor, because at the end of the day we have to stop feeling sorry for ourselves and start getting our act together. We’re a Third World country because of our Third World mentality. The Philippine entertainment industry has blamed this sudden decline to movie piracy. Yes, Pilipinos themselves cheat their own fellow Pilipinos when they pirated original movie DVDs produced by original film makers. The reason for their pirating activity is of course, poverty.

Majority of most Pilipinos do not have jobs that could augment their respective live, thus some resort to this cheating act. Original film makers cannot blame some Pilipinos patronizing pirated movie version of their films because most pirated copies are very cheap and affordable than the original ones. Moreover, you can watch in advance movies which are soon to show on movie theaters through pirated copy of it. Thus, the piracy industry cannot be totally be stop and abolish by the original film makers though there are chances they caught some who are involved in movie piracy and destroyed lots of pirated movie DVDs.

Quiapo, a heaven for pirated movies and software. The Golden Mosque is situated in the heart of the Muslim district. Here you can find hundreds of shops and stalls selling pirated DVDs, VCDs and CDs for as low as 15 pesos. You can purchase whatever movie you want from the latest Hollywood movie to hardcore porn. Every imaginable software program is here on sale. Photoshop, Lightroom, Windows XP, Vista, you name it, they got it. It is a huge business and the counterfeit items are openly sold. In 2004, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo enacted Republic Act 9239 or the Optical Media Act.

Those found violating RA 9239 faced a maximum penalty of P1. 5 million in fines and six years imprisonment. But when you visit Quiapo you can see with your own eyes how this illegal trade is still flourishing and it is obvious that it is tolerated by the authorities and the police. Taking pictures here is definitely not recommended! It is quite tricky if not plain dangerous. I tried it and it was met with anger. One shop owner started shouting at me and soon a little mob assembled. I didn’t understand what they were saying but I moved on as quickly as I could… I guess they thought I was working for the FBI. -) Anyway, in the spirit of honesty, I have to state that except from this incident that I provoked I never encountered any problem. People are generally friendly and I didn’t got a feeling of insecurity. I was even invited in one small eatery for a chat with some of my Muslim brothers. I managed to take some snapshots and then moved back to the side of Quiapo Church where non Muslim Filipinos are basically selling exactly the same pirated movies and software. It was much more easy to take pictures there.

Parental Role Changes/Trust Issues

Parental Role Changes/Trust Issues.

 Page #1: 1. How have the roles of parents varied over the last 100 years? Identify if you feel these changes have been beneficial or not. 2. What is the current role of families and how does that role influence the process of providing state-of-art special education services? Page #2 What can educators do to establish trust with parents who have had very negative experiences with the educational system in the past? Post your solution to this situation.

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