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ENG 315 Strayer University Cancellation of Preorders Block Business Letter

ENG 315 Strayer University Cancellation of Preorders Block Business Letter.

My name is Christie PaschallChoose one of the professional scenarios provided in Blackboard under the Course Info tab, or click here to view them in a new window. Write a Block Business Letter from the perspective of company management. It must provide bad news to the recipient and follow the guidelines outlined in Chapter 7: Delivering Bad-News Messages in BCOM9 (pages 116-136).The message should take the block business letter form from the example provided on page 123 of the eBook; however, you will submit your assignment to the online course shell.The block business letter must adhere to the following requirements:Content:Address the communication issue from the scenario.Provide bad news from the company to the recipient.Concentrate on the facts of the situation and use either the inductive or deductive approach.Assume your recipient has previously requested a review of the situation via email, letter, or personal meeting with management.Format:Include the proper introductory elements (sender’s address, date, recipient’s address). You may create any details necessary in the introductory elements to complete the assignment.Provide an appropriate and professional greeting / salutation.Single space paragraphs and double space between paragraphs.Limit the letter to one page in length.Clarity / Mechanics:Focus on clarity, writing mechanics, and professional language/style requirements.Run spell/grammar check before submitting.This course requires use of Strayer Writing Standards (SWS). The format is different than other Strayer University courses. Please take a moment to review the SWS documentation for details.Assignments must be submitted through the online course shell only.The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:Plan, create, and evaluate professional documents.Write clearly, coherently, and persuasively using proper grammar, mechanics, and formatting appropriate to the situation.Deliver professional information to various audiences using appropriate tone, style, and format.Analyze professional communication examples to assist in revision.To download the assignment instructions provided above and assignment rubric, click here.By submitting this paper, you agree: (1) that you are submitting your paper to be used and stored as part of the SafeAssign™ services in accordance with the Blackboard Privacy Policy; (2) that your institution may use your paper in accordance with your institution’s policies; and (3) that your use of SafeAssign will be without recourse against Blackboard Inc. and its affiliates.Institution Release StatementENG315 Professional Scenarios1. Saban is a top performing industrial equipment salesperson for D2D. After three years of working with his best client, he receives a text message from Pat (his direct manager) assigning him to a completely different account. Pat has received complaints that Saban gets all of the good clients and is not a “team player.” Saban responds to the message and asks for a meeting with Pat to discuss this change. Pat responds with another text message that reads: “Decision final. Everyone needs to get a chance to work with the best accounts so it is fair. Come by the office and pick up your new files.” Moments later, Saban sends a text message to Karen, his regional manager and Pat’s boss. It simply reads, “We need to talk.” 2. Amber, Savannah, and Stephen work for Knowledge, Inc. (a consulting company). While on a conference call with Tim Rice Photography (an established client), the group discusses potential problems with a marketing campaign. Tim Rice, lead photographer and owner of Tim Rice Photography, is insistent the marketing is working and changes are not needed. Amber reaches over to put Tim on “Mute” but accidently pushes a different button. She immediately says to Savannah and Stephen that the marketing campaign is not working and that “…Tim should stick to taking pretty pictures.” Tim responds, “You know I can hear you, right?” 3. James shows up to work approximately five minutes late this morning, walks silently (but quickly) down the hallway and begins to punch in at the time clock located by the front desk. Sarah, the front desk manager, says, “Good morning, James,” but James ignores her, punches in, and heads into the shop to his workplace. Sarah rolls her eyes, picks up the phone, and dials the on-duty manager to alert her that James just arrived and should be reaching his desk any moment. 4. Paul works for the website division of SuperMega retail company. He receives an email late Friday afternoon that explains a new computer will launch at the end of next June and it will be in high demand with limited stock. Also contained in the three-page-message is that customers will be able to preorder the item 30 days before launch according to the production company. Paul is asked to create a landing page for consumers who are interested in learning more about the product. By mistake, Paul sets up a preorder page for the product that afternoon (well in advance of the company authorized period) and late Friday evening consumers begin to preorder the product. Sharon, Vice President of Product Sales at SuperMega, learns of the error Saturday morning and calls Paul to arrange a meeting first thing Monday morning. Sharon explains to Paul on the phone that the company intends on canceling all of the preorders and Paul responds that the company should honor the preorders because it was not a consumer error. After a heated exchange, Paul hangs up on Sharon when she insists that the preorders will be canceled because of Paul’s error.
ENG 315 Strayer University Cancellation of Preorders Block Business Letter

Hello there, I need help with two homework sections at my Hawkes Learning account – It is Intermediate Algebra and 1 section has 5 questions and the other section has 8.. I’m studying for my Algebra class and don’t understand how to answer this. Can you help me study?

Hello there, I need help with two homework sections at my Hawkes Learning account – It is Intermediate Algebra and 1 section has 5 questions and the other section has 8.
I will provide my username and password. Then you just have to go to and certify at
Lesson: 3.2 Applications: Systems of Equations and do the certification that is composed of 5 questions.
And then to
Lesson: 8.1 Algebra of Function and do the certification that is composed of 8 questions
Hello there, I need help with two homework sections at my Hawkes Learning account – It is Intermediate Algebra and 1 section has 5 questions and the other section has 8.

Antipsychotic Prescription Rates

Share this: Facebook Twitter Reddit LinkedIn WhatsApp As the United States enters one of the worst drug crises in its history, children and adolescents are being prescribed mediation at younger and younger ages and at faster and faster rates (Vitiello, 2012). The use of antipsychotic medication in the treatment of various disorders in both children and adolescents has been on the rise despite the strong side effects affiliated with these medications and the controversy surrounding diagnosing young children with psychiatric illnesses. This paper will look at the high level of variability that accompanies diagnosing children with psychotic disorders as well as the rates of prescriptions for non-psychotic conditions and the implications of using such medications at young ages. The issue that is important to the discussion surrounding antipsychotic prescription rates for children is the ambiguity that accompanies the diagnostic criteria for psychiatric illness in children and adolescents. Currently, the boundaries for diagnosis are unclear and between health professionals and there is a lack of consistency in how to consider the presentations of psychotic disorders in the developmental trajectory. Unlike with adults who have lived longer and who have had longer time to establish their “normal” functioning it becomes difficult to discern developmental issues of behavior and conduct with the symptoms of mental illness. How does one establish that the belief that a monster is at the bottom of the stairs is a delusion as opposed to a normal childhood worry? The difficulties in forming a consensus about the epidemiology of childhood schizophrenia has to do with the rarity of the disorder, hindrances in describing symptoms due to developmental constraints in children as well as the difficulty of discerning childhood experiences present in normal developmental trajectories from abnormal psychopathological symptoms (e.g. fantasies from delusions) (Russell, 1994). Childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) is marked by the manifestation of psychotic symptoms before the age of 13. Schizophrenia is rarely diagnosed until adulthood (Gochman, 2011). When comparing prevalence rates, in the United States, 1 in 40,000 children are diagnosed with schizophrenia when compared to 1 in 1,000 adults (Gochman, 2011). The conversation surrounding this disorder centers on if schizophrenia with onset in childhood is clinically different from schizophrenia with a later onset. Additionally, little research has been conducted from a longitudinal perspective on the stability of this diagnosis over time. Prognoses for children with schizophrenia are worse than adults (Gochman, 2011). In a study conducted looking at the clinical presentation of child-onset schizophrenia, auditory hallucinations were found to be the most common symptom present in the sample, all of which were hearing voices (Russell, 1994). Most of these voices were also found to be negatively-centered with violent content such as “shut up” as opposed to positive or affirming content. About 37% of the sample also endorsed visual hallucinations. In the sample, 63% of children suffered from delusions with no singular classification being predominant. The complexity of the delusions was found to vary by age and often times the delusions seen in children with schizophrenia reflect a child-like theme not seen in adults with the disorder (Russell, 1994). A large portion of the sample was also found to have met the criteria of disorganization that is marked by illogical thought or speech patterns. This study also found a large instance of comorbid psychopathology in the subjects such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, dysthymia and bipolar disorder, whose incidence in childhood is also controversial and will be discussed further in the paper. The issue for determining the age of onset of COS, or when behavioral symptoms first emerge, is that it is highly dependent on subjective interpretation of the symptoms based on interviews with children and parents. The average age of onset found by the paper was determined to be 9.5 years, with a confidence interval being from 4.9 years to 13.3 years. There have been issues surrounding comparing the presentation of child and adult-onset schizophrenia due to the variance of the samples to represent the populations. Regardless, preliminary studies have shown that the distribution for delusions and both visual and auditory hallucinations are similar for both of these populations. These symptoms in younger populations, however, can give rise to multiple, alternative diagnoses by professionals which plays into the idea of the unclear boundaries surrounding this disorder in children. COS is commonly misdiagnosed as an autism spectrum disorder or a different type of developmental disorder (Bartlett, 2014). According to a study looking at the difficulties diagnosing children with schizophrenia the clinical rating scales are in place for diagnoses have “limited usefulness …when used to screen severely ill, medicated children with psychoses” (Gochman, 2011). Bipolar disorder in children is also accompanied by controversy as the manifestation of its symptoms occurs at this critical period of development where behavior and mood patterns can be somewhat erratic. The accompanying rollercoaster of emotions in adolescence and the sporadic nature of mood in childhood can be difficult to distinguish from hypomania or volatile mood swings. In order to be diagnosed with the disorder, it must be found that the symptoms and the malfunctioning in emotion regulation must be significantly impairing. What was formerly known as pediatric bipolar disorder is now diagnosed as disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) which is characterized by intense temper tantrums and abrupt mood swings as well as periods of hyperactivity followed by lethargy (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). There appears to be great overlap in the presentation of bipolar disorder and other disorders such as ADHD and so the detectable features of this disorder often become masked. As a consequence of this, the prevalence rates of this disorder become difficult to determine (Copeland, 2013). The heavy comorbidity of psychiatric illnesses in youth who are prescribed antipsychotics may reflect the “degree of diagnostic uncertainty in children and adolescents with behavioral health problems” (Penfold, 2013). To conclude, the validity of diagnosing young populations is highly unknown and so the use of antipsychotics to treat these disorders becomes muddled in this controversy as now the question becomes, “what illnesses are these treatments actually being used for?” Antipsychotics are divided into two classifications according to their development, first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs), otherwise known as “typical” antipsychotics and second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) or “atypical” antipsychotics. FGAs are marked by their side effects that often affect motor ability and can be marked by restlessness, contractions, inability to move muscles or repetitive, involuntary movements (Seida, 2012). To contrast, SGAs are thought to have less severe side effects in terms of motor impairment but can be accompanied with significant weight gain, the development of diabetes as well as elevations in blood sugar and cholesterol levels (Seida, 2012). Increased motor impairment with SGA treatment has been seen at higher doses, however. According to one study, there appears to be no difference in efficacy between these two types of antipsychotics in pediatric populations with psychotic disorders (Fraguas, 2011). Despite this finding however, SGAs have been prescribed at higher rates in children and adolescents as opposed to FGAs. The perceived safety of using these newer antipsychotics can be attributed to the increased use rate trends. These drugs also do not need to closely be monitored for neurotoxicity such as with lithium or antiepileptic medication (Vitello, 2012). This creates an image of feasibility of use and acceptability for the use of SGAs and the transition of these medications for treating non-psychotic disorders (Olfson et al., 2006). The FDA has approved four atypical antipsychotics for pediatric bipolar disorder and schizophrenia however antipsychotics are used less often for psychotic disorders and more for other problems. In a study looking at pediatric use of antipsychotics, these medications have been increasingly prescribed “off-label” to treat behavior problems such as defiant disorder or conduct disorder, ADHD and sleep disorders in children (Penfold, 2013). The American Psychiatric Association in its recommendations has explicitly stated that antipsychotics should not be prescribed to treat “behavioral and emotional symptoms of childhood mental disorders.” According to a paper looking at the trends for prescription rates, there has been a “twofold to fivefold increase” for the use of antipsychotic medication in preschool children (Harrison, 2012). In the United States, from 2004-2005 the use of antipsychotics in individuals under 19 constitutes 15% of total antipsychotic use. This is an 8% increase from 1996-1997 (Domino and Swartz, 2008). Not only are the rates of antipsychotic prescriptions in pediatric populations increasing but there have also been significant increases in the rates of mood and anxiety disorders, psychoses, developmental disorders, and disruptive behavioral disorders in younger populations (Paus et al., 2008). A factor in the increase in antipsychotic use for the treatment of emotional and behavioral problems in children can be attributed to the conceptualization of these problems from a medical perspective and the necessity of pharmacological intervention as the appropriate treatment. This phenomenon is reflected in the fact that the rates for all types of psychiatric medication and not just antipsychotics have seen increases in the past 20 years (Vitiello, 2012). This increase may contribute to an “environment of acceptability” for prescribing adolescents antipsychotics and decrease the preventative stigma that may hinder the use of these medications for this population. Additionally, in the U.S. there is limited availability of mental health treatment as well as access to inpatient services and thus the widespread availability of antipsychotics and their ability to stabilize patients could account for the rise of antipsychotics (Case et al., 2007). Antipsychotic medication is noncurative and thus an individual with schizophrenia remains on antipsychotics for the duration of their life to stabilize the symptoms of their illness. The weight gain associated with SGAs persists throughout the entirety of treatment (Vitiello, 2012). Because child-onset schizophrenia occurs earlier in life and is thought to have worse prognoses than adult-onset schizophrenia, these individuals remain on medication for longer durations and this exposure could be implicated with higher mortality rates (Arango, 2004). Some studies have shown that children, when compared to adults, have a higher sensitivity to the metabolic side effects of SGAs and the extrapyramidal effects of FGAs (Correll et al., 2006). With regards to weight gain, children gain proportionately more weight and gain that weight at a faster pace when compared to adults on the same medication (Correll and Carlson, 2006). Adolescents have a heightened susceptibility to the psychological adverse effects of antipsychotics as well (Arango, 2004). This is due to this particular stage of life where adolescents are particularly vulnerable because of their physical development and the sensitivity to the perception of peers (McCracken et al., 2002). Individuals who are on SGAs and experience weight gain may feel socially isolated or further stigmatization as a result of adverse effects on medication. This social rejection can also have profound effects due to adolescents’ heightened desire to fit in and for acceptance from their peers. The abundance of the use of antipsychotic medications for treating a wide breadth of conditions in pediatric populations has outpaced the research to support the efficacy of these medications long-term. According to an article in Pediatric Health Care, younger populations have an increased likelihood of being on multiple psychotropic medications with 80% of preschoolers being prescribed another psychotropic medication in addition to their antipsychotic (Olfson, 2015). The side effects of medications can also be exacerbated when those drugs share common effects. This means that there are potentials for exacerbations of side effects in children which can have an immense influence on their behaviors as well as physiology. There is rapid brain development during puberty and adolescence however little review on the cognitive effects of antipsychotics or research on the long-term effects on brain development (Aman et al., 2012). The implications of this are profound as off-label prescription rates could continue to rise despite a dearth of knowledge of long-term consequences and thus populations of children could continuously be exposed to serious adverse effects that have life-long consequences. It can be concluded that further research needs to be conducted in order to fully understand the implications of medicating children with antipsychotics for behavioral or emotional disorders. More data needs to be conducted on other intervention methods that can supplement pharmacological interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or other forms of psychological therapies that don’t have such severe side effects. Overall, more support for inpatient and outpatient mental health services to promote accessibility for treatment with specialists can potentially counter the over-reliance on antipsychotics as a way to treat behaviors rather than the underlying illness. References: American Psychiatric Association, DSM-5 Task Force. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-5™ (5th ed.). Arlington, VA, US: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc.. Arango, C., Parellada, M., Moreno, D.M., (2004). Clinical effectiveness of new generation antipsychotics in adolescent patients. Eur. Neuropsychopharmacol. 14 (4), 471–479.  Bartlett, J. (2014). Childhood-onset schizophrenia: what do we really know?. Health Psychology And Behavioral Medicine, 2(1), 735-747. Correll, C.U., Carlson, H.E., (2006). Endocrine and metabolic adverse effects of psychotropic medications in children and adolescents. J. Am. Acad. Child. Adolesc. Psychiatry 45, 771–791. Correll, C.U., Penzner, J.B., Parikh, U.H., Mughal, T., Javed, T., Carbon, M., Malhotra, A.K., (2006). Recognizing and monitoring adverse events of second-generation antipsychotics in children and adolescents. Child Adolesc. Psychiatr. Clin. N. Am. 15, 177–206. Copeland W., Angold A., Costello E., et al. (2013). Prevalence, comorbidity, and correlates of DSM-5 proposed disruptive mood dysregulation disorder. Am J Psychiatry. 170:173–9. Domino, M.E., Swartz, M.S., (2008). Who are the new users of antipsychotic medications? Psychiatr. Serv. 59, 507–514. Fraguas, D., Merchán-Naranjo, J., Laita, P., Parellada, M., Moreno, D., Ruiz-Sancho, A.,Cifuentes, A., Giráldez, M., Arango, C., (2008). Metabolic and hormonal side effects in children and adolescents treated with second-generation antipsychotics. J. Clin. Psychiatry 69, 1166–1175. Gochman, P., Miller, R.,

20 year data set for African countries in excel

research paper help 20 year data set for African countries in excel.

IfI need data on sovereign spreads of some African countries listed below. This is defined as the difference between the interest rate on bonds in a given country and interest rate on bonds in the USA of comparable maturity, say 10 years bond. You can get this information from either Bloomberg or IMF for those specific countries. You know what I want, right? You have to give me year on year data for those countries specified: The 10 years bond rate plus the corresponding 10 years bond rates from the USA. These data can be gotten from Bloomberg. These are the updated Africa countries that I need the data for. Algeria, Angola, Botswana, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Egypt, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Lesotho, Libya, Malawi, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe:I need 20 years data set (for each of the countries sovereign spreads of all of the African countries listed above. Note: Every data for the countries should be get a corresponding data for the USA bonds rate for the same 10 years bond. Sovereign spread is defined as the difference between the interest rate on bonds in each of those countries and interest rate on bonds in the USA of comparable maturity, say 10 years bond.
20 year data set for African countries in excel

Civil War

Civil War.

1. Based on your assessment of the reading what is the main objection of the Free Soil Party to slavery? 2. According to the reading why and how has slavery “impeded the progress and prosperity of the South”? What do the statistics tell us? 3. On what basis does Frederick Douglas’ oppose slavery? 4. What arguments does William Wilson put forward to oppose slavery? How might they contradict some of the arguments we read that supported slavery? 1. How and why does Mott reference Christian biblical teachings to appeal to her audience? 2. Consider all of the readings for this week, contrast the arguments presented in opposition to slavery?
Civil War

Common Ground Approach to HR 109 Outline

Common Ground Approach to HR 109 Outline.

Paper 3: Common Ground Approach to H.R. 1096-8 PagesWe’ve read essays where writers reflect on their own places, and make arguments about the necessity for and integrity of connections found in those spaces/places. We’re also looking at HR 109, titled “Recognizing the duty of the Federal Government to create a Green New Deal,” which is the newest piece of writing of all the writing in this unit. It’s important to understand that this is not proposed legislation; rather it is seeking support of recognition of concerns, and arguing that some kind(s) of legislation should be created to address the concerns and achieve other goals.In this paper, you will:Use the Rogerian argument’s model to find common ground between different perspectives, and present your own argument to bring different sides together with a balanced perspective.Here are possible approaches to this essay:You are an elected representative in the U.S. House, and want to “work across the aisle” by proposing an idea that you think could/should be supported by a majority.Identify various points of view regarding this, and propose common ground between those points of view.Make an argument for a provision or set of provisions you’d like to see in possible legislation that comes from this resolution, and explain how it/those speak to the concerns and goals outlined in the resolution.To do that, you will:In your essay, first, introduce the problem.Acknowledge various sides. This may take several paragraphs.Next, you should carefully present your side of the issue in a way that does not dismiss the other side(s). This may also take several paragraphs.You should then work to bring the two sides together. Help your audience see the benefits of the middle ground. Make your proposal for the middle ground here, and be sure to use an even, respectful tone. This should be a key focus of your essay and may take several paragraphs.Finally, in your conclusion, remind your audience of the balanced perspective you have presented and make it clear how both sides benefit when they meet in the/a middle.After your paper and works cited references, write a reflection where you detail your writing process for this paper, specific things you think are working well in the paper, and any challenges you had, as well as asking a question or directing me to something you’re concerned about.Your paper should:Provide an introductory paragraph that presents an idea and puts it in context.Have a thesis statement that makes the purpose of the paper clear.Be Organized/have a Structure advancing that thesis in at least 6 body paragraphs before concluding.Summarize, paraphrase, and quote sources as needed to support your points.Make sure to properly cite all your sources both in text and in a Work Cited page at the end of your paper according to MLA format.Be mindful of grammar and mechanics in your writing.To submit, click on the big blue button to the top right. Please make sure to follow these formatting guidelines:All papers are to be in 12 pt, Times New Roman or Cambria font, double spaced, standard margins and in .doc or .docx or PDF format. These are academic standards—and, most likely, the default settings on your computer, so don’t mess with them. Citations are to be in MLA format. This Rough Draft will be worth 20% of the total points for the Paper.
Common Ground Approach to HR 109 Outline

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