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Editing of Statement of purpose for University of Southern California application

Editing of Statement of purpose for University of Southern California application. Help me study for my Application Writing class. I’m stuck and don’t understand.

Please help me editing this statement of purpose(attached file) including structure, grammar, language, and etc. It is better if you can add more details regarding the program
I’m applying for two programs:

Electrical and Computer Engineering (Machine Learning and Data Science) (MS)

Electrical Engineering (Computer Networks) (M.S.)

The school requirement is that:
The personal statement should describe succinctly your reasons for applying to the proposed program at the Viterbi School of Engineering, your preparation for this field of study, study interests, future career plans, and other aspects of your background and interests which may aid the admissions committee in evaluating your aptitude and motivation for graduate study.
my detail information is:
LabView | OrCAD | Powerful user of Excel | PuTTy | C | Cadence | P Spice | Mathematica | Matlab | SolidWords PCB | Arduino
Product Model Engineer, 06/2016 to 09/2016
Shenzhen Ganwei Software Technology Co., Ltd. – Shenzhen, China
•Produced ad hoc reports and documents for senior team members.
•Created and built firmware to test alarm.
•Verified data integrity and accuracy.
Assistant Engineer, 06/2018 to 09/2018
Shenzhen Huada Limited By Share Ltd – Shenzhen, China
•Adjust and assemble antenna and control board.
•Created and built firmware to test security walk through metal detector.
•Verified stream data integrity and accuracy.
•Assemble the integrated control box.
•Co-designed and test power distribution requirements for the construction of high tech manufacturing
facilities.
•Performed in-depth electrical acceptance testing of completed hardware, including continuity and high potential
isolation testing.
•Troubleshot and debug electrical equipment including antenna, temperature sensors, infrared ray sensor, cooler.
•Monitored installation and operations to consistently meet rigorous customer requirements.
•Created signal generator and firmware to test hardware.
•Managed engineering changes using SAP systems.

•Responsible for site safety and coordination
Editing of Statement of purpose for University of Southern California application

Child development theories help explain how children continually change over the time in their childhood. Theories like Erik Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development and Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development, center on a variety of aspects of development including social, emotional and moral growth. These theories create a base for a framework of the growth milestones children will experience from birth and into early adulthood. Both theorists are some of the many that provide important information of the importance of how childhood social and personality emerges through the interaction of social influences, maturation, and a child’s representation of not only the world but of themselves. Erik Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development and Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development provide the influence of significant relationships, the development of social understanding, the growth of personality, and the development of social competence within Mary Lennox in The Secret Garden. Mary Lennox was placed in two different settings where she lived that have affected her development during her life. In the beginning of The Secret Garden, Mary was belittled as a character and even a child from her parents in India. Her mother was more focused on attending events and going to parties rather than being a parent to Mary and hardly interacted with her daughter. Mary’s father is hardly mentioned but even he hardly had any interaction with his daughter as well. “Her father had held a position under the English Government and had always been busy and ill himself, and her mother had been a great beauty who cared only to go to parties and amuse herself with gay people” (Burnett; Ch.1). This quote proves that Mary basically did not have her parental figures and her only influence during her development from birth to about nine years of age was her Ayah, her caretaker. Until then the cholera broke out in her household and she lost her Ayah. “She did not cry because her nurse died. She was not an affectionate child and had never cared much for anyone. The noise and hurrying about and wailing over the cholera had frightened her, and she had been angry because no one seemed to remember that she was alive” (Burnett; Ch.1). Mary has been neglected basically most of her ten years of life until she then goes to live with her uncle, Archibald Craven, in his manor. Mary is impacted by adults like Archibald Craven, Mrs. Medlock, Martha Sowerby, Susan Sowerby, Dr. Craven, and especially Dickon. They potentially helped Mary develop in the three child developmental stages in the Misselthwaite Manor. In Erik Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development, there are eight stages. Mary is only able to go up to the fourth stage which is industry versus inferiority. In the first stage, trust versus mistrust (birth to eighteen months), Mary’s first year of life did have that much trust. Due to the neglect she received from her parents she did not have that faith and love for them. The fact she only had her Ayah, the only thing she knew and felt is that she was cared for. Although she was fed, clothed, and basically given what she wanted, she did not have what she truly wanted. She longed for affection, direction, or know she existed to her parents. “During the first stage of psychosocial development, children develop a sense of trust when caregivers provide reliability, care, and affection. A lack of this will lead to mistrust” (Cherry; Understanding Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development). Due to that neglect from her parents, she is delayed in building bonds with other people since she does not have that proper skill set to do so. The second stage, autonomy versus shame, Mary does not seem to be delayed. “Children need to develop a sense of personal control over physical skills and a sense of independence…Children who struggle and who are shamed for their accidents may be left without a sense of personal control. Success during this stage of psychosocial development leads to feelings of autonomy, failure results in feelings of shame and doubt” (Cherry; Understanding Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development). Mary is essentially independent and does everything on her own when it comes to toileting herself. In the third stage, initiative versus guilt, is the stage where Mary revolves around the most. Mary takes control and is assertive with the actions she takes and does not gain that feeling of guilt. In the beginning of her stay in the manor, she has no purpose until she began to develop that purpose once she found the garden. “Children need to begin asserting control and power over the environment. Success in this stage leads to a sense of purpose” (Cherry; Understanding Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development). Children who try to exert too much power experience disapproval, resulting in a sense of guilt. Once she began working on the garden, bringing the garden life, building meaningful relationships with the adults around her, and helping her Colin, she was finally seen and brought life back to the manor. She gained the skill of being competent. In the fourth stage, industry versus inferiority, is the last stage Mary was able to reach. “Children need to cope with new social and academic demands. Success leads to a sense of competence, while failure results in feelings of inferiority” (Cherry; Understanding Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development). What caused her behavior to change with others was the influence of Dickon and Colin. Mary learned to become patient, not afraid to make mistakes, and was open to new ideas thanks to them. With Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development, Mary was presented with an amount of dilemmas and was seen throughout The Secret Garden her reasoning behind her judgements of each dilemma. Kohlberg has three levels with six stages which are presented with Mary in the story. The first stage is pre-conventional and Kohlberg says, “Children see rules as fixed and absolute. Obeying the rules is important because it is a means to avoid punishment. At the individualism and exchange stage of moral development, children account for individual points of view and judge actions based on how they serve individual needs” (Cherry; Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development). In the first stage, punishment and obedience, Mary was never really punished for her actions in the story. When her uncle basically forbad her to go into the garden, she did otherwise because she did not care about the rules. The rules were not fixed because she was “Mary Quite Contrary” (Burnett; Ch. 2). In the second stage of level one, self-interest, Mary is only interested in doing what she wants and just serving her own needs before she meets Colin. Once she meets Colin she was willing and able to reciprocate by helping others and moving past self servitude. The second stage is conventional morality which is, “Often referred to as the “good boy-good girl” orientation, the interpersonal relationships stage of moral development is focused on living up to social expectations and roles. There is an emphasis on conformity, being “nice,” and consideration of how choices influence relationships” (Cherry; Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development). In the third stage, conformity and interpersonal, Mary begins to do this stage in the story once she opens up to the adults and Colin in the manor. She is able to see and feel the care and love from others and that it is okay to be cared for and conform to care and love others back. In the fourth stage, authority and social order, she is in the brink of reaching this stage but does not. Mary considers her dear one’s close to her around her when making judgements in the last chapter of the book. “Circumstances, however, were very kind to her, though she was not at all aware of it. They began to push her about for her own good…there was no room left for disagreeable thoughts which affected her liver and her digestion and made her yellow and tired’ (Burnett; Ch. 27). Post-conventional which is, “Kohlberg’s final level of moral reasoning is based on universal ethical principles and abstract reasoning. At this stage, people follow these internalized principles of justice, even if they conflict with laws and rules” (Cherry; Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development). In the fifth stage, social contract, this stage did not stand out as much as the other stages for Mary. The adults in the manor did not really give her many rules and the few they did give her she ignored. Mary roamed around and did what she wanted while led back to the first level so this stage does not necessarily apply to her. As well as in the last stage, universal principles, Mary has not reached this stage as well. She has not reached this point of development in the book and has not developed, “universal ethical principles and abstract reasoning” (Cherry; Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development). Erikson and Kohlberg both provide important information of the importance of how childhood social and personality emerges through the interaction of social influences, maturation, and a child’s representation of not only the world but of themselves. Through their theories, it is demonstrated with Mary Lennox from The Secret Garden. Mary by influence of significant relationships, the development of social understanding, the growth of personality, and the development of social competence was able to show how she matured as a character in the story. Works Cited Burnett, Frances Hodgson, and Tasha Tudor. The Secret Garden. Harper, An Imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2011. Cherry, Kendra. “Kohlberg’s Theory of Moral Development.” Verywell Mind, Verywell Mind, 13 Mar. 2019, www.verywellmind.com/kohlbergs-theory-of-moral-developmet-2795071. Cherry, Kendra. “Understanding Erikson’s Stages of Psychosocial Development.” Verywell Mind, Verywell Mind, 4 June 2019, www.verywellmind.com/erik-eriksons-stages-of-psychosocial-development-2795740.
Radiation Dose Reduction Strategies in Cardiac CT Angiography Research Paper. Introduction With great advancements in technology especially in the field of medicine, computed tomography (CT) has developed to become a very important clinical tool (Smith-Bindman et al. 2009). The use of CT examinations has also substantially increased. In the U.S., for example, the number increased from 3 million from the 80s to about 70 million by 2007. Computed tomography has been integrated into various healthcare procedures and has led to the dramatic improvement of patient health care. For this reason, CT has been considered among the most useful technologies in medicine. The use of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) has been established to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (Goitein et al. 2011). This is basically because it allows for non-invasive evaluation of coronary arteries (Flohr, Raupach, and Bruder 2009). It is currently used in the evaluation of acute chest pains. CCTA is also used in the elimination of coronary atherosclerosis. For this particular reason, it has been recognized to be valuable among those with intermediate cardiovascular risks (Torres et al. 2010). Despite the importance of CT in medicine, it is known to be a great source of radiation that may be harmful to the human health. The radiation doses associated with this procedure is said to be much higher than those associated with the x-rays. A typical example is that of a chest CT scan. It is said to deliver more than 100 times that of a conventional chest radiograph (Flohr, Raupach, and Bruder 2009). Therefore, the increased use of CT in medical examinations has led to the subsequent increase in the exposure of ionizing radiation to individuals. This has led to great concerns since exposure to ionizing radiation has been associated with the development of cancer (Smith-Bindman et al. 2009). In a particular study, the amount of radiation that is exposed to the patient during a single CT scan was compared to that which the long-term Chernobyl survivors were exposed to (Smith-Bindman et al. 2009). Radiations from cardiac CT angiography have increased the impact and prevalence of cardiac atherosclerosis among individuals. For this reason, regulation of the exposure of these elements has been necessary and has been done through adherence to the ALARA principle, which stands for ‘As Low As Reasonably Achievable’. The ALARA principle came about as a measure to reduce the harmful effects of radiation during any procedure involving radiation (Stolzmann et al. 2008). This implies that reasonable methods should be employed in order to ensure that an individual encounters minimum radiation doses. It is believed that each radiation dose increases the risk of genetic mutation or cancerous developments. However, since it is also necessary to maintain the image quality in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, it is important to consider both the radiation doses and image quality while performing CCTA. Studies have shown how to comply with the ALARA principle while maintaining an image quality that would be useful in diagnosis (Torres et al. 2010). Methodology The method used for this paper included a thorough literature search to find relevant peer-reviewed articles. The various databases that were used included Medscape, ScienceDirect, PubMed and ProQuest. The keywords that were used included ‘Cardiac CT Angiography’, ‘CT radiation doses’ and ‘radiation reduction strategies in CT angiography’. From the available articles, only those that were most relevant to the study were selected. Relevance of the articles was determined through the analysis of the articles’ titles, abstracts and conclusions. The results were also checked and highlighted. In order to ensure up-to-date information, the search criterion was limited to articles published between 2008 and 2013 (not more than 5 years old). From the articles selected, various radiation reduction strategies were highlighted and may be summarised as shown below. Tube current Tube Potential ECG Gating Position of Patient Z-axis Coverage Automatic Exposure Control (ACE) Collimation Using of Dual Energy Technology Exposing the Area of Interest Only (FOV) Fast Gantry Rotation Time Using Reconstruction Techniques Pitch Over-ranging Objectives To identify the various strategies to reduce radiation exposure in cardiac (coronary) CT angiography To highlight some of the limitations associated with CCTA To provide recommendations for the appropriate strategies to employ while performing coronary CT angiography Tube current Studies have indicated that the tube current within the CT suite should not be constant for all individuals (Leipsic et al. 2010). Several strategies have been studied to ensure optimal tube current during CCTA. One of the strategies employed is the weight-based approach. This approach aims at adjusting the tube current based on the individual’s body weight or body mass index (Lee et al. 2012). This may be necessary to avoid the possibility of overexposing the individual to radiation. The tube current should be tailored to fit the individuals with different Body Mass Index (BMI) (Leipsic et al. 2010). This is meant to correct for different body shapes in order to ensure minimal radiation exposure while maintaining diagnostic image quality (Tatsugami et al. 2008). Further research is underway to explore possibility of using diameter or thoracic shape (Shrimpton et al. 2009). This may provide a better alternative for future use as practitioners observe the ALARA principle. Tube Potential The tube potential also determines the amount of radiation exposure to patients (Lund et al. 2009). The relationship between the two is exponential. Increasing the tube voltage increases the radiation exposure by the square of that factor (Torres et al. 2010). ECG Gating For CCTA to be successful, “motionless” images of the coronary arteries should be acquired. For this to happen, all reconstructed images at a specific time must correspond to a specific point in the cardiac cycle. This may be made possible through ECG gating, which involves synchronizing with the ECG (Stolzmann et al. 2008). One of the ways this is done is through retrospective ECG gating. This involves the activation of the x-ray beam throughout the entire cardiac cycle. Images are then reconstructed in any desired phase of the cycle. This method allows for the selection of the appropriate images to reconstruct for each vessel. Despite the fact that this method allows for the assessment of any wall motion abnormality, valve function and ejection fraction, it exposes the patient to high radiation doses. The alternative method, prospective ECG Gating, involves the same procedure but is only done in a specific period in the cycle (Wu, Budovec, and Foley 2009, 958). The interval between a whole cycle is referred to as the R-R interval. The x-ray tube is only activated at a particular point in the interval and is referred to as the phase window. As the phase window is made narrower, the radiation dose is also decreased. Therefore, this method may be useful in minimizing exposure of radiation to the patient. However, this also comes at a cost. Fewer phases of the cycle will be available for image reconstruction. For this reason, it may be difficult to obtain quality images with an increased heart rate (DeFrance et al. 2010). Position of Patient Another important factor to consider while reducing radiation dose is the position of the patient in the gantry. The patient should be placed in such a way as to ensure that the area of concern is placed at the isocenter. This would ensure that the beam crossing that region in whatever direction would cross as much body tissue as possible. A well-positioned patient would facilitate constant image noise and avoid increased surface radiation dose (Bae et al. 2008). Z-axis Coverage The total radiation dose is greatly influenced by the craniocaudal length (Khan et al. 2011). This is basically due to the fact that it directly relates to the dose-length product. One way of reducing the radiation dose in CCTA is by limiting this length. Automatic Exposure Control (ACE) The ACE is a device that facilitates the termination of x-ray exposure. The x-ray terminal may be operated by man or automatically by the ACE. This device ensures that there is a consistent x-ray film. It may be useful in ensuring reduced radiation dose to the patient since it ensures a good consistent x-ray density in order to match the shapes and sizes of different individuals (Bae et al. 2008). Collimation The adaptive section collimation is a method that is promising to reduce radiation dose in CCTA (Deak et al. 2009). The results from a study by Deak and his colleagues showed that this method allowed great reduction of unnecessary exposure to radiation due to z-overscanning. They recommended that it could be used together with other strategies such as AEC and spectral optimization. Using of Dual Energy Technology The use of dual source CT has provided solutions to problems that were experienced during the implementation of CT angiography. The main problem was the fact that imaging needed rapid volume coverage while resolving the disease in vessels. This technology employs the use of two x-ray sources and detectors and ensures double temporal resolution at twice the speed (Torres et al. 2010). Therefore, radiation exposure is minimized. Exposing the Area of Interest Only (FOV) Another way of decreasing radiation dose is by exposing the area of interest only for imaging. This ensures that there is an increased z-coverage requiring few images that maintain diagnostic image quality (Khan et al. 2011). Fast Gantry Rotation Time In order to facilitate underexposure of radiation to the patient, some scanners have the capability of sub-second gantry rotation times. When this is coupled with tube current modulation, it causes tube current saturation. This means that the tube current works at maximum capacity (Israel et al, 2008). Using Reconstruction Techniques The reconstruction method used is also an important consideration. There are two classes that include the surface-based and thresholding-based reconstruction techniques. The thresholding-based reconstruction is preferred (Leipsic et al. 2010). This is due to its speed and its use of relatively small amount of computational power. Pitch The high-pitch CT angiography is a technology that has helped achieve reduced radiation exposure to patients. This is mainly because they have significantly reduced the scan time and allowed greater volumes to be covered at a time (Apfaltrer et al. 2012). Over-ranging Over-ranging is another strategy for reducing radiation dose exposure. It facilitates the covering of large areas during scanning in order to ensure that the examination is done at a shorter period. The wide-range detectors may be used to facilitate this. Limitations of CCTA Despite the many advantages associated with cardiac CT angiography, this technology has its limitations. CT scanners produce ionizing radiation that come into contact with the patient while under examination. Increasingly high exposure to radiations from these procedures increases risks of cancer. This is even more worrying since the number of people exposed to these radiations has increased over time since CCTA procedures are done virtually everywhere. Some studies have shown the possibility of CT angiography false-detecting coronary obstruction where it actually does not exist (Nissen 2008). Such a high false-positive rate may be dangerous since it may lead to unnecessary procedures. For CCTA to be successful, the heart rate must be about 65 beats per minutes (McCollough 2008). When this heart rate is exceeded, the quality of images may be affected. Foods and drinks containing caffeine may increase heart rate. Therefore, patients should be encouraged not to take them before examination. Patients also need to be trained on proper breath-holding techniques in order to get diagnostic images (Hausleiter et al. 2009). Another limitation is the fact that contraindicated contrast material may lead to misinterpretation of results. Lack of clinical and radiological experts is another limitation since not many are trained in the field. Since the machines used for CCTA are expensive, lack of funding may lead to the use of poor equipment. Discussion The technology behind CCTA has proved very beneficial in the field of medicine. Several improvements have been made to make examination more effective and efficient. This includes reduction of radiation exposure and improved image quality. Despite the several studies that have been done in order to reduce radiation dose, several limitations still exist. This calls for further research in the field. Recommendations Several strategies have been studied but each has its pros and cons. While using ECG gating, for example, it would be recommended to use the prospective ECG gating instead of using retrospective ECG gating (Miller, Rochitte, and Dewey 2008, 2330). Among the various protocols used in CCTA, the 64-row MDCTCA has been recommended (Johnson, PannuRadiation Dose Reduction Strategies in Cardiac CT Angiography Research Paper

University of Colorado at Boulder The Single Story by Chimamanda Discussion

University of Colorado at Boulder The Single Story by Chimamanda Discussion.

Discussion 2 
2828 unread replies.3737 replies.
This week’s discussion takes Chimanda Ngozi Adichie’s video “The Danger of the Single Story” (Links to an external site.) and the Al Jazeera video “How does colonialism shape the world we live in?” (Links to an external site.) as its primary focus. You should engage with other course materials as well your own experience/expertise as you respond to the following questions.

In your own words, what does Adichie mean by a single story?
Think of a time where you realized your idea of someone/something was based off of a single story. How did you realize you were trapped by the single story? How did it make you feel? What did you learn?
Is there a single story of colonization? Of development? What is it?
How does the Al Jazeera video attempt to challenge the single story?
What is the danger of the single story and how might we avoid falling into its trap?

“Adichie refers to the single story as skewed depictions of an unfamiliar place a person has never been to or learned about. When she asked her roommate in a college in the US about Nigeria, the people had no idea that English was the official language in Nigeria, and Adichie was shocked (TED). In my personal experience, I first thought that Rwanda was not a technologically advanced country. I knew that Rwanda has a horrible past with genocide and colonization by Belgium. When I learned that Rwanda was a technologically advanced country with high emphasis in IT, I was really shocked. Although I learned this fact from a Netflix show, this has forced me to reconsider whether the single story of Africa is true, which is Africa is not a developed continent and there is continuous wars, and democracy is very fragile.
There is a single story of colonization and development. For example, after World War II ended, Japan became a prosperous country with a booming economy with the help of the US. However, many people do not know that Japanese economy did not start booming after the Korean War started1. The Aljazeerja video attempts to challenge a single story by gathering a group of excerpts from various backgrounds by giving their viewpoints on various topics such as national identity and long term effects of colonialism in a specific country, which cannot be learned from a history textbook.
Knowing a single story about colonization and development does not necessarily give a holistic view point and accurate context about a country. In order to avoid getting into the trap of a single story, it is important to learn history from multiple points of view in a foreign country in order to avoid falling into the trap of a single story and orientalism.  For example, if I want to know what the US did to help reconstruct Japan after WWII, it is important to learn about post-war construction efforts in Japan, US, and another country. In addition, it is important to promote cross-cultural exchange especially among the young people, so that they can learn and experience a different country that does not necessarily match a single story”
#2 to respond to: 
”  I’ve watched Adichie’s ted talk a countless amount of times and my ever changing view on the single story changes every time I listen to it. She mentions how she grew up as a creative individual writing stories and having each character in her story be what her imagination wanted it to be. Her idea of a single story is of a single story of catastrophically. She mentions her single stories of writing of American children’s books, her roommates response, and her from being from Africa. Single stories are formations of stories that only have one view or side to a total concept. She takes the time to show the importance of knowing both sides of a story and to be educated on others before assumptions are made. This will yield a better response and understanding of others in the way we are able to perceive a single story. 
    A time I took advantage of a single story was of my roommate freshmen year. He would sit around all day, wouldn’t go to class, sleep in, as well as never take out the trash. I saw him as a lazy person who had no drive motivation or saw anything for himself. One day after seeing things so pied up I just sat down and had a conversation with him. I found he was lost, he didn’t know what he wanted to do with his life, and wanted to take new classes that made him excited in things he wanted to study. My assumptions I made of him were wrong. He wasn’t lazy, rude, and gross, but yet these were in effect of him not doing things he wanted to do. These were his way of expressing himself as he didn’t want to do what he wanted. It was exciting to talk to him to see what he was doing and how I could see him grow over the rest of freshmen year. 
    I believe there is a single story of colonialism and development as they are each difficult in the way we choose to describe them. Deepening on your culture, where your from in the world, and how you are raised, this will change the way these are defined. This is why it is so difficult to describe these concepts as we look at each one and see it a different way. 
    Al Jazeera’s video Challenges the single story in a way that exploitation has changed colonialism. We are all now becoming more involved in learning and traveling to new parts of the world to really understand how and why countries are ran as they are, as well as how they came to be. One of the major contributors to this is the individuals who lived in that country. One of the guys in the video describes how he only knew this one side to his county as that is all he was told through his political and well up being. 
    The danger of single stories ranges from our upbringing to what we know about others. It is critical to take the time to to venture out, learn, and become educated on all aspects of the concept to then make an assumption about it. In being close minded and not learning about the full issue will raise problems as raised by Adichie. ”
University of Colorado at Boulder The Single Story by Chimamanda Discussion

COMM 120 GC Human Beings Social Creatures & Good Communication Skills Essay

essay writing help COMM 120 GC Human Beings Social Creatures & Good Communication Skills Essay.

I’m working on a communications multi-part question and need support to help me study.

COMM 120 Analysis PaperAssignment DescriptionUnderstanding how to identify and respond to the communicative patterns of others is necessary when one seeks to improve their interpersonal relationships. However, it is just as important to develop the ability to understand and adjust your own patterns of communication if you desire to become a better communicator. Therefore, in this assignment you will be required to write a 3 to 5 page paper analyzing your own patterns of interpersonal communication. You will identify and apply specific course concepts and/or theories from the textbook to conduct your analysis while providing your own personal insights on how you can use this knowledge to improve your communication skills.This assignment is designed to get you to reflect on what you have learned about interpersonal communication throughout the semester and to come up with a plan for how you can improve your interactions with others. Thus, there should be two distinct parts to your paper: 1.) Your reflective analysis and 2.) Your plan for improvement. The first section, the reflective analysis, will make up the bulk of your paper. In this section, make sure to explain what aspects of your own interpersonal communication style you are analyzing by providing relevant examples. In the second section, your plan for improvement, you should provide a minimum of three specific ways you plan to improve your communication with others by using what you have learned throughout the semester.When completing this assignment, you will choose a minimum of three concepts from the textbook and utilize them in your self-analysis. You may decide to analyze one specific experience, or a small set of related experiences, thus you should home in on course concepts/material that help articulate how you intend to improve your communication based on these textbook concepts.You may choose to write about topics such as: a set of work-related experiences you have had in the past in which you did not communicate as effectively as you would have liked to (i.e. getting into arguments, unclear communication with co-workers that resulted in mistakes being made, being misperceived by a supervisor because of something you said or how you communicated, etc.); your tendency to be a poor listener and how it has had a negative impact on your relationships; a time when you failed to articulate yourself well enough and wanted to improve the clarity of your communication with others; etc.Since you will be choosing textbook concepts for this assignment, you will need to provide a reference page including in-text citations in APA style. Your paper will be judged according to the following criteria:1. Your ability to support your analysis through the use of relevant examples2. Your ability to connect classroom learning to your own patterns of communication3. The application of appropriate communication concepts and/or terminology from lecture or the textbook4. The demonstrated ability to think critically about your communicative style and to create a specific plan for improvement (quality of your writing/insights)5. Proper grammar, spelling, and overall formatLearning ObjectivesThis assignment is designed to help you:1. Apply interpersonal communication concepts in order to improve your interactions with others2. Organize information and facts into a cohesive, coherent essay3. Improve your critical thinking and writing skillsAssignment RequirementsPage limit: 3-5 pages, double-spaced, typed, 12-point font, with APA-style references sample Running head: INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION1Interpersonal Communication Student NameCuyamaca CollegeINTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION2Interpersonal CommunicationOur world today is full of diversity and inclusion from different cultures. Understanding interpersonal communication will enhance and strengthen our communication with people. Interpersonal communication is a significant factor in creating relationships, especially in the workplace. There are many different cultures in the world, and there are many various forms of communication as well. It is necessary to understand the importance of interpersonal communication to avoid offending the message of others. The purpose of this paper is to analyze interpersonal communication in two parts: the first part reflects on eye contact, listening skills, and emotional intelligence, and the second part is how to improve these forms of communication to communicate effectively and successfully with others.Part 1: Reflective AnalysisEye contact is significant to communicate with others, and it is a part of body language. When we pay attention to the person who is speaking, this means that we focused and interacting with his speech. In Chapter 6: Nonverbal Communication, the author (Adler, 2011) explains how eye contact refers to trust, attention, credibility, and signals attraction. For example, I remember when I applied for a job; I did not use my eye contact when I did the interview. During the interview, I looked at the papers in my hand when the manager spoke with me. After that, I received an email from the manager and refusing me from the job. I was sad, but I knew it is my mistake. I did the wrong thing when I did not use my body language to speak with the manager. Eye contact is one of the main factors used to communicate with others effectively.On the other hand, another factor of interpersonal communication is listening skills. Listening skills are essential between two people or teams because listening quietly to the other person leads to strengthening the relationship with him or her. Listening is defined as the active INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION2Interpersonal CommunicationOur world today is full of diversity and inclusion from different cultures. Understanding interpersonal communication will enhance and strengthen our communication with people. Interpersonal communication is a significant factor in creating relationships, especially in the workplace. There are many different cultures in the world, and there are many various forms of communication as well. It is necessary to understand the importance of interpersonal communication to avoid offending the message of others. The purpose of this paper is to analyze interpersonal communication in two parts: the first part reflects on eye contact, listening skills, and emotional intelligence, and the second part is how to improve these forms of communication to communicate effectively and successfully with others.Part 1: Reflective AnalysisEye contact is significant to communicate with others, and it is a part of body language. When we pay attention to the person who is speaking, this means that we focused and interacting with his speech. In Chapter 6: Nonverbal Communication, the author (Adler, 2011) explains how eye contact refers to trust, attention, credibility, and signals attraction. For example, I remember when I applied for a job; I did not use my eye contact when I did the interview. During the interview, I looked at the papers in my hand when the manager spoke with me. After that, I received an email from the manager and refusing me from the job. I was sad, but I knew it is my mistake. I did the wrong thing when I did not use my body language to speak with the manager. Eye contact is one of the main factors used to communicate with others effectively.On the other hand, another factor of interpersonal communication is listening skills. Listening skills are essential between two people or teams because listening quietly to the other person leads to strengthening the relationship with him or her. Listening is defined as the active INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION3process of understanding the other person’s message (Adler, R. B., & Proctor II, 2011). If we do not focus on people who speak, we will misunderstand them. For instance, I remember when my friend came to talk with me about some problems she was having with her husband. When she was talking with me, I would interrupt her, and I spoke more than she did. She felt sad because I did not listen well to her when she tried to tell me about her husband. I felt frustrated because I was not a good listener, so this is one of my weaknesses. Listening skills are considered highly significant when speaking to other people and I desire to improve mine so I can avoid hurting the people I care about in the future. In addition to listening skills, there is another part of interpersonal communication that is equally important, which is emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence is the main factor in communicating better with people in order to establish good relationships with them. When we use emotional intelligence, we can positively understand the feelings of others to reduce conflict and overcome the challenges and problems that occur. Emotional intelligence is defined as the ability to understand and respond the emotions of others, while at the same time understanding and managing our own emotions (Adler, R. B., & Proctor II, 2011). Thus, it helps us understand our feelings and the feelings of others and to work toward achieving a common goal. For example, I hurt my sister’s feelings when she asked me if I could help her with her Math assignments and I brushed her off and disregarded her request. I was so sad because I did not respect her. I was inconsiderate and selfish in my response and I should have used my emotional intelligence before acting negatively with her. Therefore, another goal of mine is to have better emotional intelligence when I communicate with other people to demonstrate that I respect them. The three stages of interpersonal communication: eye contact, listening skills, emotional intelligence will make me feel better and enhance my relationships with others. If I follow and INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION4implement each aspect of interpersonal communication, I will have a better understanding of how to deal with people from a different culture. Dealing with people from different cultures will help me to discover what happens around the world. I consider these three aspects very important when I communicate with others. So, learning how I can improve these aspects of interpersonal communication will support me inside and outside the workplace.Part 2: Plan for ImprovementThroughout this course, I learned a lot about interpersonal communication, and the three aspects of interpersonal communication that I want to improve are eye contact, listening, and emotional intelligence. I plan to improve my eye contact by paying attention to other people when they speak. I will use my eye contact before I start talking to someone else. Before I start communicating with others, I won’t let anything in my hand attract me to look. That means putting my phone down and avoiding my tablet during conversation. By avoiding looking at meaningless things, I will be able to make eye contact more effectively with the person speaking. According to Schulz (2012), “Looking down can give the appearance that you lack confidence” (par. 6). So, looking down is likely what made me lose the job that I applied to because of my lack of eye contact with the manager. The manager may of thought that I could not do work effectively due to a lack of confidence. Therefore, when I establish eye contact with the speaker, it will make me feel and appear more confident. Second, I plan to be a better listener by paying more attention, focusing on the speaker, not interrupting the speaker, setting aside distractions, and giving the speaker a chance to speak and wait until they finish speaking. By avoiding the things that keep me busy and not listening to the speaker while making the speaker feel sad since they are not being heard, I will be able to INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION5improve my listening skills. I have learned that poor listening will lead to misunderstanding while active listening will lead to better outcomes. Lastly, I plan to improve my emotional intelligence to avoid hurting people’s feelings and to learn how to communicate with others effectively. By providing love, encouragement, and support, I will be able to communicate and show my emotional intelligence. I have learned that connecting with emotional intelligence is very important to prevent hurting other people’s feelings and understand what they need. Overall, understanding these aspects of interpersonal communication, such as eye contact, listening skills, and emotional intelligence will help me to improve my communication and effectively mix with society. These three aspects of interpersonal communication helped me to understand how to improve using my interactions with others and reach more satisfying results in the process. After I master these three aspects, I will undoubtedly improve my communication. This class helped and supported me to reshape the way I communicate with people and improve my interpersonal communication inside and outside of the workplace. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION6ReferencesAdler, R. B., & Proctor II, R. F. (2011). Looking Out, Looking In (13th ed.). Boston, MA: Wadsworth Publishing. ISBN: 9780495796213Schulz, J. (2012, December 31). Eye contact: Don’t make these mistakes. Michigan State University. https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/eye_contact_dont_mak…
COMM 120 GC Human Beings Social Creatures & Good Communication Skills Essay

Could Socialism ever Work? Essay

Table of Contents Introduction Socialism: A Definition Why Socialism can Work A Case against Socialism Discussion Conclusion References Introduction There are a number of significant economic ideologies currently practiced by governments all over the world. Obviously, the most popular ideology is capitalism, which is characterized by private ownership of property and the means of production and each individual is responsible for their own lives. Socialism is another significant ideology that promises to transform government systems and create a world where fairness and prosperity for all is guaranteed. In spite of its inspiring promises, socialism continues to be viewed with suspicion by many governments and citizens who express doubts about its ability to work. This paper will argue that socialism could work with significant benefits for the entire society. Socialism: A Definition Ludwig (2009) defines Socialism as “a policy which aims at constructing a society in which the means of production are socialized” (p.20). Socialism advocates for the abolition of the private-enterprise economy favoured by capitalism and the establishment of a system where public ownership maintains a dominant position in the economy. Why Socialism can Work Socialism will lead to a more sustainable community characterized by low poverty rates. High government involvement and a huge welfare system will lead to greater distribution of wealth among the citizenry. Citizens of many developed nations are beginning to acknowledge that the capitalistic system is unsustainable. Problems such as starvation and homelessness are being experienced by the richest countries in the world due to a lack of emphasis on social services. Socialism is characterized by an emphasis on provision of social services by the government. Galbraith and Ludmila (2004) document that this crucial services decrease the mortality rate and increase the standards of living for the citizens. In a socialistic society, the government in exchange for high taxation guarantees pension, housing, and healthcare. Norway, a country that leans to socialism, enjoys very low poverty rates and unemployment rates compared to countries that are primarily capitalistic such as the US. Socialism can work in the current environment where poverty levels are rising and unemployment rates are increasing in most countries. Socialism can work since it provides a feasible way to deal with the gross inequalities that the world currently faces due to capitalism. Citizens in both developing and developed nations all over the world are experiencing growing income disparities that are increasing the divide between the rich and the poor. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More These social injustices can be blamed on an exploitative capitalistic system that rewards the capital owners at the expense of the labour providers (Schwartz

Central Michigan University Written Communication Paper

Central Michigan University Written Communication Paper.

. it must be 4 pages and not less. 1100words.You must use APA, format, and at least one source. format and I‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‍‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌nstructions Compose a written communication about “THE FUTURE STATE OF THE PROFESSIONAL WORK CENTER AND NEW SPACE DESIGN STANDARDS” based on your Strategic Communications Plan. Part 1 1. Develop your written communication. a. State your key message clearly. i. Do not “bury the headline”—the main point should be presented directly. ii. Your key message must be clear and concise. b. Provide the necessary information and build credibility. i. Provide an appropriate amount of background information for the audience, given the type of communication. ii. Get to the point without unnecessary verbiage. iii. Build your position as an expert or trusted colleague. c. Support your key message with three or four supporting points or reasons. i. Supporting points should be appropriate for the context and needs of the audience. ii. Reasons should be compelling and re‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‍‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌levant. d. Employ either the tell/sell or consult/join techniques. e. Clearly relay to the audience an actionable request. 2. Write professionally. a. Communication should be clear and concise. b. Communication should build logically. c. Sentences should ?ow smoothly, using appropriate transitions and varying sentence structure. d. Employ appropriate formatting for ease of reading and clarity of message (headers, bullet points, etc.). 3. Demonstrate professional presence. a. Be authentic and genuine in your communication. b. Use the appropriate tone and vocabulary for your audience. c. Establish rapport to connect with your audience and grow the relationship. Part 2 4. Channel and style. a. Explain why you chose the speci?c channel you used for the written communication. b. Explain what style you employed in your written communication (tell/sell, consult/join) a‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‍‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌nd why.
Central Michigan University Written Communication Paper

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