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E-mail Presentation

E-mail Presentation.

Suppose there has been an incident at your organization that will require a forensic investigation of company computers and email. You have been asked by the head of your organization to prepare a presentation for the non-technical staff that explains how email works and the types of information that forensic email investigations attempt to uncover.Consider the following when creating the presentation:What is the appropriate level of detail for non-technical employees regarding the process of e-mail and forensic investigations?What are qualities of an informational and appealing PowerPoint presentation?Deliverable:For this assignment, you are to:Create a presentation that includes a graphic depiction of how e-mail works and discusses the types of information forensic e-mail investigations attempt to uncover.Your presentation should be at least 6-8 slides in length, not including title and reference slides. Be sure your presentation adheres to the University academic writing standards and APA style guidelines, citing references as appropriate.
E-mail Presentation

Experiments were undertaken to obtain the bulk density, particle density, and soil porosity of four soil samples. Bulk density, particle density, and soil porosity are all interrelated terms. Density is the relationship between the mass (m) and volume (V) of a substance. . Based on this relationship, an object or substance that has high mass in relation to its size (or volume) also has a high density (D). Soil bulk density (Db) is a measure of the mass of soil per unit volume (solids pore space) and is usually reported on an oven-dry basis. The particles that make up a soil have a specific particle density (Dp), which is defined as the mass of solid particles in a unit volume. This can be expressed as, . The particle density of a soil is not affected by particle size or arrangement; rather it depends on the type of solid particles present in the soils. Unlike the measurement of particle density, the bulk density measurement accounts for the spaces between the soil particles (pore space) as well as the soil solids. Soils with a high proportion of pore space have lower mass per unit volume, and therefore have low bulk density. A bulk density greater than 1.6 g cm-3 may indicate soil compaction, which means these soils have a low proportion of pore space and, therefore, low porosity. The bulk density indirectly provides a measure of the soil porosity which is the ratio of the volume of soil pores to the total soil volume. Clayey soils generally have an abundance of very small pores that give them a higher total porosity compared to sands, which are dominated by larger, but fewer pores. MATERIALS: 1. Core soil samples 2. Balance (0.1 g precision) 3. Flat-bladed knife 4. Veneer calliper 5. Disturbed soil samples 6. 100 ml measuring cylinder 7. De-aired water METHOD: The bulk density of the soil was calculated after following a series of steps. Firstly, excess soil from each of the disturbed soil sample was removed using a flat-bladed knife, ensuring that the bottom of the sample was flat and even with the edges of the ring. Excess material or roots penetrating from the sample was cut using a scissors. The dimensions of the core were then measured using a veneer calliper and the dimensions obtained were plugged into the formula Volume= Ï€ * radius 2* height to calculate the volume of the core. This value was then used to obtain the bulk density of the soil (Db = ). Afterwards, approximately 50g of soil was weighed out in a weigh dish for each soil sample and the soil weight was recorded to the nearest 0.1 g. e 50 cm of water was then poured into a 100 ml graduated cylinder and the previously weighed soil was added into the water in small increments. Air bubbles were eliminated by stirring with a rod and the final volume of the soil water suspension was read and the value was recorded. This value was then used to calculate the particle density of each soil sample (Dp = ). Using the measured densities the percentage soil porosity was calculated via the formula, 100-( Db / Dp * 100). Data was recorded and presented in a tabular format. RESULTS: SOIL SAMPLE HEIGHT OF CORE (cm) DIAMETER OF CORE (cm) VOLUME OF CORE SAMPLER (cm3) 1 5.548 5.36 125.2 2 3.862 5.58 94.5 3 4.889 5.858 131.8 4 4.798 5.384 109.2 FIGURE 1: TABLE SHOWING THE HEIGHT, DIAMETER AND VOLUME OF THE CORE SAMPLER FOR EACH SOIL SAMPLE. SOIL SAMPLE WEIGHT VOLUME (cm3) 1 319.6g 69 2 276.6g 69 3 273.2g 71 4 343.6g 70 TABLE SHOWING THE WEIGHT AND VOLUME OF THE FOUR SOIL SAMPLES. SOIL SAMPLE WEIGHT OF FIELD MOIST SOIL SAMPLE (g) WITH CORE WEIGHT OF DRY SOIL SAMPLE (g) WITH CORE WEIGHT OF CORE (g) WEIGHT OF DRY SOIL SAMPLE (g) (WEIGHT OF DRY SOIL WITHOUT CORE WEIGHT) 1 356.7 319.5 188.5 131 2 277.4 276.6 105.1 171.5 3 390.1 273.2 145.8 127.4 4 245.6 343.6 104.5 239.1 FIGURE 1: TABLE SHOWING WEIGHT OF FIELD MOIST SOIL SAMPLE AND OVEN DRY SOIL SAMPLE. SOIL SAMPLE WEIGHT OF SOIL SAMPLE (g) INITIAL VOLUME OF WATER (cm3) FINAL VOLUME OF WATER (cm3) VOLUME OF THE SOIL PARTCLES (cm3) 1 50.00 50 69 19 2 50.00 50 69 19 3 50.00 50 71 21 4 50.00 50 70 20 FIGURE 4: TABLE SHOWING WEIGHT OF SOIL SAMPLE, INITIAL VOLUME OF WATER, FINAL VOLUME OF WATER AND VOLUME OF SOIL PARTICLES. SOIL SAMPLE BULK DENSITY (g/cm-3) PARTICLE DENSITY (g/cm-3) SOIL POROSITY (%) 1 1.9 6.9 72.5 2 2.49 9.03 72.4 3 1.8 6.1 70.5 4 3.42 12 71.5 FIGURE 2: TABLE SHOWING THE BULK DENSITY, PARTICLE DENSITY AND SOIL POROSITY OF EACH SOIL SAMPLE. To calculate how many grams of soil are in a hectare plow layer: Depth = 15cm =0.15m Hectare = 10,000m2 Volume of HPL = Area of Hectare * Depth of plow = 10,000 * 0.15 = 1500m3 Db = 1.4g/cm3 = 1kg = 1000g ∴1400kg=1400 Ã-1,000 = 1,400,000g Therefore, there are 1,400,000g of soil in a hectare plow layer. DISCUSSION: Soil porosity and bulk density are interrelated terms. Soil bulk density (Db) is a measure of the mass of soil per unit volume while soil porosity is the ratio of the volume of soil pores to the total soil volume. Bulk density (Db) is closely related to the soil porosity through the following relationship:. The bulk density indirectly provides a measure of the soil porosity (amount of pore space). The value obtained from the measurement of soil bulk density can be used to calculate pore space. For soils with the same particle density, the lower the bulk density, the higher the percent pore space or total porosity. Soil porosity values range from 0 to 1. Soils with a high bulk density have low total porosity because empty pores do not have any mass. When the bulk density is zero, porosity equals 1, meaning there are no particles. If the bulk density is equal to the particle density, then there are no pores and porosity is zero. Soil porosity can be affected by changes occurring in the soil. The porosity of the soil decreases in compacted subsoils and increases in well- aggregated, high organic matter surface soils. The values range from as low as 25% to more than 60% respectively. Soil management can also alter soil porosity values such that, cultivated soils tend to have a lower total pore space as a result of a decrease in organic matter content and a consequent lowering of granulation, in comparison to uncultivated soils. Bulk density and porosity are also affected by changes in soil texture. Fine-textured soils including clay, clay loam and silt loams typically have lower bulk densities as compared to sandy soils, due to the presence of pores between and within the granules. As a result, these fine-textured soils containing a high proportion of pore spaces to solids tend to have low bulk densities. Sandy soils, on the other hand, though larger in particle size have larger yet fewer pore spaces, resulting in a higher bulk density. In terms of porosity, fine-textured soils are very porous. This is because of the large amount of micropores in fine-textures soils which allow water to be held. These micropores prevent the water from being drained away and therefore, result in high total porosity. In contrast, sandy soils have less total porosity due to the relative absence or lack of fine, within-ped pores. This allows water to be drained away easily through the macropores present in sandy soils. Additionally, bulk density and porosity are affected by changes in the size class of the soil particles. Bulk density is lower in sandy soils or well-sorted sand where the particles are generally of one size class whereas a mixture of different size particles (well-graded sand) will cause a high bulk density. In well-graded sand the smaller particles partially fill in the spaces between the larger particles causing a reduction in the pore spaces and a resultant increase in bulk density. Soil porosity, on the other hand, is decreased in well-graded sand as compared to well-sorted sand. Another factor impacting bulk density and porosity is compaction. Soil compaction refers to the disruption and reduction of the large pores within the soil. It can be caused in a variety of ways such as, the practice of poor agricultural practices, use of machinery on soil, etc. Compaction increases the mass in a given volume, which increases the measured bulk density. Bulk density increases because both the micropores and macropores in a soil are significantly reduced after compaction has taken place. Therefore, with the removal of these empty pores, the mass of soil increases in a given volume. With regards to porosity, compaction reduces the total pore spaces and hence, the total porosity. In conclusion, bulk density and porosity are two interrelated soil properties which are altered by various factors including soil texture, compaction and soil structure. Calculations into the bulk density and porosity were carried out. Some limitations presented were the fact that bulk density and porosity values would differ from place to place due to certain factors, for example, the level of compaction in an area. However, these figures can be useful in determining the crop yield of a soil.
Gender Studies homework help. Assignment: Case Study – The Slippery SlopeCASE STUDYRead the following case study, about the Slippery Slope of Litigating Geologic Hazards at California’s Portuguese Bend. The case study is broken into three parts. After each part, you will answer a few questions related to the reading. Submit a MS Word document or *.pdf file with your responses for each question to the assignment dropbox. All answers should be in your own words (do not copy and paste definitions). Answer each question in at least three complete sentences (upwards of 36-42 words per answer); some answers may require more explanation than others. There ten (10) questions, each question is worth 4 points. You will be deducted points for short and incomplete answers.PART I. NEWS ARTICLEHomeowners Allege Negligence (AP)ÿHomeowners in the exclusive Portuguese Bend neighborhood near Long Beach, CA have filed a class action suit in state court against the County of Los Angeles. This suit seeks compensation for damages to 160 homes affected by a landslide encompassing an area of roughly 270 acres. The homeowners allege that this landslide was caused by road construction along Crenshaw Boulevard, a county highway that traverses the northern portion of the slide area. The lawsuit also alleges fraud and negligence on the part of the developers for participating with the county in road construction in a geologically unstable area.Portuguese Point, most recent times; during sunset. Lizzie McVeigh, (2007), photograph,ÿSource.QuestionsWhat is the essence of this article?What is the scientific basis for the homeowners’ suit?What information is required to evaluate the scientific basis of this lawsuit?PART II. LANDSLIDELand UseLand use on the Palos Verdes Peninsula (Figure 1) consists mostly of single-family homes built on large lots, many of which have panoramic ocean views. The affluent residents of this area value a rural lifestyle, and the peninsula is zoned to permit horses, stables, and riding trails. Figure 2 is a topographic map showing the Portuguese Bend area.ÿBy the time of the 1956 Portuguese Bend landslide, more than 100 homes had been built within the slide area, most of them south of Palos Verdes Drive. All of these houses were constructed with individual septic systems, generally consisting of septic tanks and seepage pits.ÿGeologic SettingÿThe topography of the peninsula is generally hilly, ranging from gently rolling to steep. A bluff exists along the coastline, varying between 30 and 60 meters (100 and 200 feet) in height above sea level, and elevations rise to over 460 meters (1500 feet) within 4.5 km (3 miles) of the coast. The preslide topography was characterized by a series of terraces that rose from the sea like giant steps. However, within landslide areas, terraces have been disrupted and the terrain now appears hummocky and irregular. Large arcuate scarps occur near the head of slide masses.ÿWithin 1.5 km (one mile) of the coastline, the subsurface consists of volcanic and sedimentary rocks that dip toward the sea at about the same angle as the average slope of the land surface (Figure 3). Landslide slip surfaces occur near the base of a volcanic rock unit known as the Portuguese Tuff. This rock unit includes a layer of bentonite, a clay mineral that forms from the weathering of volcanic ash and is capable of absorbing large amounts of water.ÿLandslide MovementÿLandslides have been active here for thousands of years, but recent landslide activity has been attributed in part to human actions. The Portuguese Bend landslide began its modern movement in August 1956, when displacement was noticed at its northeast margin. Movement gradually extended downslope such that the entire eastern edge of the slide mass was moving within six weeks. By the summer of 1957, the entire slide mass was sliding towards the sea.ÿThe rates of slippage have varied through time, initially moving between 2 and 12 cm/day (1 and 5 inches/day) for the first two years, and then diminishing to less than 1 cm/day (0.4 in/day) over the next four years. The slide mass continued to move for almost 40 years, and the cumulative displacement exceeds 30 m (100 feet) in some areas.Figure 1. Palos Verdes Peninsula, CA, 2016,ÿGoogle Maps, DigitalGlobe.Figure 2. Portuguese Bend, Topographic MapÿUSGS Topographic Mapsÿ(zip file).Figure 3. Landslide Cross Section. (Ozsvath)QuestionsWhat natural conditions in this area are conducive to landslides?What specific type of mass movement is likely to occur in this geologic setting?Is it possible that the 1956 Portuguese Bend Landslide was triggered entirely by natural causes?PART IIISlide Effects On StructuresThe effects of the landslide have been progressive, first causing damage and then destruction of homes and other structures. Many roads in the area are buckled and broken, requiring repeated repairs. By 1961, more than 150 homes had been destroyed or seriously damaged by the slide. Since then, many additional homes have been affected to some degree, and Palos Verdes Drive has been in constant need of repair. All underground utilities have been placed in above-ground steel pipes with flexible couplings.ÿAlbers V. County Of Los AngelesÿAffected homeowners filed suit in 1961 against the County of Los Angeles in a successful effort to obtain compensation for their losses, which amounted to nearly $10 million in 1960 dollars. The suit charged the county with liability based on negligence for the construction of Crenshaw Boulevard, which added weight to the upper slopes of the slide mass in the form of artificial fill. Although negligence could not be established, the county was found liable by the presiding judge using inverse condemnation.ÿArguments by experts for the county brought several facts to light that were ultimately ignored in the judgment. These included: (1) the amount of artificial fill used in constructing Crenshaw Boulevard equaled only 0.5 percent of the total landslide mass in terms of weight, (2) the water added through septic system discharge and lawn irrigation probably caused groundwater levels in the slide mass to rise, and (3) detergents in the septic system effluent would be expected to have a negative effect on the strength of saturated bentonite clays.ÿCorrective ActionsÿAn early attempt to prevent further slope movement was made by installing precast concrete pins through the slide mass in 1957. These pins, measuring 1.2 m (4 ft) in diameter and 6 m (20 ft) in length, extended 3 m (10 ft) into the underlying bedrock. Initially they slowed the rate of slope movement by 50 percent; however, after five months, the pins failed and movement accelerated.ÿThe first of a three-phase stabilization project involved the installation of eight dewatering wells in the slide mass during the mid-1980s. Phase 2, completed during the late 1980s, included road relocations, surface drainage improvements, regrading the seaward side of the slide mass, and the addition of five more wells. In the early 1990s, revetments were placed at the base of the bluffs to protect them from wave erosion. Following the completion of this third phase, parts of the landslide were largely stabilized.QuestionsIf you were the judge, who do you think is responsible:ÿA.ÿthe County for its negligence,ÿB.ÿthe homeowners who chose to build their houses on the edge of a bluff, orÿC.ÿboth parties share equal responsibility?ÿExplain your reasoning to the rest of the court.How would the construction of Crenshaw Boulevard differ from the earlier construction of houses in terms of its ability to trigger a landslide?What do the successes of various corrective actions taken here suggest was/ were the cause(s) of the landslide?REFLECTIONQuestionIn Florida, king tides, storm surges, and heavy rains can cause some streets in Miami Beach to flood. It can shut down many businesses and deter tourism. How could the Portuguese Bend case study relate to the coastal flooding in Florida?Note:ÿDid you remember to answer all 10 questions with at least three complete sentences (36-42 words per answer)?Gender Studies homework help

Miami Dade College ISBAR Scenario Discussion Post

Miami Dade College ISBAR Scenario Discussion Post.

I want you to use either iSBAR or EPIC.iSBAR or EPIC iSBARidentify Situation BackgroundAssessment Recommendation EPICEngage Propose Inform Call to Action Create a scenario. This can be from social work, healthcare, or something general. You can practice asking your little brother to clean the room, or to facilitate communication from a case manager to a nurse to facilitate care, treatment, or services. Or, you can practice policy practice. Use either iSBAR or EPIC, and then comment on at least two of your colleagues’ work. Did they use the acronym correctly? Any suggestions? Help? Guidance? Don’t shoot for perfection – but an enhanced understanding of the importance of communication and teamwork.
Miami Dade College ISBAR Scenario Discussion Post

SWOSU Wk 2 Bible Creation Story Discussion

professional essay writers SWOSU Wk 2 Bible Creation Story Discussion.

Listen to the audio lecture below while viewing the PowerPoint presentation.PPT Introduction to Pentateuch and TorahPlay media comment.Audio (16:01 min) [Transcript]PPT Genesis Chapters 1-11 (Parts 1-4)Part 1Play media comment.Audio (15:17 min) [Transcript]Part 2Play media comment.Audio (19:58 min) [Transcript]Part 3Play media comment.Audio (20:52 min) [Transcript] Part 4Play media comment.Audio (20:58 min) [Transcript]1/ “Briefly” list one new concept, idea, or fact learned from the audio lecture and/or PowerPoint presentation. These journal entries may be very brief – Four to Five sentences are sufficient.2/ (2.5) Audio Lectures Forum 44 unread replies.44 replies.Audio Lecture forums follow the same convention every week, though the content of the reading changes with new chapters.Each week you will engage several audio lectures, many of which are tied to specific powerpoint presentations, though some are more akin to a presented with the expectation that learners take notes on the lecture in a traditional note-taking process.Numerous themes will be covered within the scope of each week’s Audio Lectures. In this forum you will add a new discussion topic to begin your reflection.From the content of the Lectures, each student will chose two specific themes, names, dates, ideas, or issues learned from the lecture for creating a post in the Audio Lecture Forum. You will be writing your initial response AND responding to classmates’ posts.From the Two Specific themes/issues the learner has discerned, the learner will conduct simple research on the internet or in the library about the content discerned. Research may use Wikipedia as a source, though since Wikipedia is a basis search landing page, it will not be counted for credit. Sources should include data from “.edu” pages and from the work of sources that are collaborative and not from simple “blogs.” [As an example, Judaism.com is a collaborative site, where jew.blogger.com is a jew.blogspot.com is a lone individual who can not be traced.]In the intial forum post to the Audio Lecture, learners will affirm: “I have listend to X% the audio lectures for this week” (where X is the percetn the student actually engaged.)Then learners will highlight two themes discerned from the lecture, along with additional notes about extra material they discovered about each issue from their research. Each post about each issue should be a minimum of 150 words, including citation references listed. In this way, intial posts should be a minimum of 300 words. Your initial post should be completed by Thursday midnight of each week (CST)
SWOSU Wk 2 Bible Creation Story Discussion

Columbia Southern Interactions Between Populations of Organisms Exam Practice

Columbia Southern Interactions Between Populations of Organisms Exam Practice.

Unit III Homework Due: Tuesday, 07/21/2020 11:59 PM (CST) Instructions For this assignment, you will need a computer with Internet access. Part I Click the following link: http://www.seafoodwatch.org Under “Ocean Issues,” click “Wild Seafood.” Read each tab (i.e., Wild Seafood Home, Overfishing, Illegal Fishing, Bycatch, Habitat Damage, and Management). Part II Click the following link: http://www.seafoodwatch.org/ocean-issues/aquacultu… Read each tab under Aquaculture (i.e., Aquaculture Home, Wild Fish, Pollution & Disease, Escapes, Habitat Damage, and Management). Part III Click the following link: http://www.seafoodwatch.org/ocean-issues/fishing-a… Watch the videos and/or read the captions to learn about the different ways in which seafood is harvested. For some methods, there will be a video; for others, there will just be an image and a caption.
Columbia Southern Interactions Between Populations of Organisms Exam Practice

UMUC What Does Strategic HR Mean & Thoughts About Functions in Today World Questions

UMUC What Does Strategic HR Mean & Thoughts About Functions in Today World Questions.

QUESTION 1: What does Strategic HR mean?In Chapter 1, we talk about the role HR plays within today’s organizations. It’s logical is it not? Today, the most valuable asset a company can have is its employees! Years ago while pursuing our MBAs, we took courses in Inventory Management, Production, and Plant Operations. But then twenty years ago our economy was based upon manufacturing and a company’s production capacity and inventory were of prime importance. Today, we’re in the information age and employees, especially creative employees with innovative ideas and technological skills, are paramount.Twenty years ago, an HRM was little more than an administrator, someone to process the application form and ensure the new employee’s beneficiary form was completed correctly. Today, HRM’s are strategic partners in every thriving business enterprise developing policies and programs to support the mission of the business enterprise. Be sure to read and understand the information presented in Table 2.1 on pages 3 and 4 of your text.In your own words, discuss what it means to be a strategic business partner. Why is it important for the HR strategy to be aligned with the business strategy? What skills are important for HR managers to have to be able to effectively add strategic value to the organization?Don’t forget to read over and then respond to a colleague’s ideas.Be sure to include citations from at least two sources you used to develop your responses!QUESTION 2: Thoughts about HR Functions in today’s world The field of human resource management has changed significantly over the past several decades. Make note of the HR functions identified in the readings and reflect carefully on the responsibilities of today’s HRMs. From your reading, as well as your own observations and/or experience (if applicable), please describe how the human resource function has changed over the last decade or so. Do you anticipate any further changes to the human resource management role in the near or distant future? If so, please explain your rationale.Once you’ve posted your thoughts, take the time to respond to a colleague’s ideas.
UMUC What Does Strategic HR Mean & Thoughts About Functions in Today World Questions