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create a write up that analyzes the major organizational

create a write up that analyzes the major organizational.

Instructions:Review the provided cases (RWC7-1, RWC7-2, and RWC8-2) and the “The Rewards and Risks of Packaged Enterprise Systems” sidebar in your textbook. Using what you’ve learned and any related outside research, create a write up that analyzes the major organizational (managerial, end user, and technological) issues involved in the deployment of enterprise system. What we’re looking for is a general understanding of the issues involved when implementing enterprise systems.As a minimum (80%), your posting should include:Link each of these cases to the Value Chain functions and value chain stakeholder (supplier, customer, partner, employees) they support. (Each case may address different value chain elements)Identify and explain the major managerial, end-user, and technical issues that impacted enterprise system implementation in these cases. (Not all cases have the same issues)Citations for resources used in developing your answer (Citations should be in APA format)After submitting, create a substantive comment on at least two other student’s posting. (I agree is not a substantive comment)Additional points will be assigned for inclusion of additional materials and/or analysis (i.e., cross industry comparison, inclusion of additional industry cases supporting (in a positive or negative way) your assessment, etc.)
create a write up that analyzes the major organizational

ACC 561 Strayer University Accounting of Cook Farm Supply Company Worksheet.

Cook Farm Supply Company manufactures and sells a pesticide called Snare. The following data are available for preparing budgets for Snare for the first 2 quarters of 2020.
1.Sales: quarter 1, 28,600 bags; quarter 2, 42,600 bags. Selling price is $62 per bag.2.Direct materials: each bag of Snare requires 4 pounds of Gumm at a cost of $3.80 per pound and 6 pounds of Tarr at $1.50 per pound.3.Desired inventory levels:
Type of InventoryJanuary 1April 1July 1Snare (bags)8,10012,40018,500Gumm (pounds)9,10010,30013,200Tarr (pounds)14,30020,30025,500
4.Direct labor: direct labor time is 15 minutes per bag at an hourly rate of $16 per hour.5.Selling and administrative expenses are expected to be 15% of sales plus $177,000 per quarter.6.Interest expense is $100,000.7.Income taxes are expected to be 30% of income before income taxes.Your assistant has prepared two budgets: (1) the manufacturing overhead budget shows expected costs to be 125% of direct labor cost, and (2) the direct materials budget for Tarr shows the cost of Tarr purchases to be $299,000 in quarter 1 and $425,500 in quarter 2.(Note: Do not prepare the manufacturing overhead budget or the direct materials budget for Tarr.)Prepare the sales budget.COOK FARM SUPPLY COMPANYSales Budgetchoose the accounting period For the Quarter Ending June 30, 2020For the Six Months Ending June 30, 2020June 30, 2020QuarterSixMonths12Expected unit salesenter a number of unitsenter a number of unitsenter a number of unitsUnit selling price$enter a dollar amount $enter a dollar amount $enter a dollar amount Total sales$enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount Prepare the production budget.
COOK FARM SUPPLY COMPANYProduction Budgetchoose the accounting period For the Quarter Ending June 30, 2020June 30, 2020For the Six Months Ending June 30, 2020QuarterSixMonths12select an opening production budget item Expected Unit SalesBeginning Direct MaterialsTotal Direct Labor CostRequired Production UnitsTotal Required UnitsDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Required Direct Labor HoursDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Materials RequiredDirect Materials PurchasesCost per PoundDirect Materials per UnitTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionDesired Ending Direct MaterialsBeginning Finished Goods UnitsDirect Labor Time per UnitTotal Cost of Direct Materials Purchasesenter a number of unitsenter a number of unitsselect between addition and deduction AddLess: select a production budget item Desired Ending Direct MaterialsBeginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Materials RequiredCost per PoundBeginning Direct MaterialsTotal Direct Labor CostRequired Production UnitsDirect Materials per UnitDirect Labor Cost per HourDirect Labor Time per UnitTotal Required Direct Labor HoursDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Required UnitsTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDirect Materials PurchasesExpected Unit Salesenter a number of unitsenter a number of unitsselect a summarizing line for the first part Total Materials RequiredExpected Unit SalesTotal Direct Labor CostBeginning Finished Goods UnitsDirect Materials PurchasesDirect Materials per UnitCost per PoundTotal Required Direct Labor HoursDesired Ending Direct MaterialsBeginning Direct MaterialsTotal Required UnitsDirect Labor Cost per HourDirect Labor Time per UnitTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionRequired Production UnitsDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Cost of Direct Materials Purchasesenter a total number of units for the first partenter a total number of units for the first partselect between addition and deduction AddLess: select a production budget item Direct Materials PurchasesDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesBeginning Direct MaterialsDesired Ending Direct MaterialsTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionCost per PoundDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Materials RequiredExpected Unit SalesBeginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Required UnitsDirect Labor Time per UnitRequired Production UnitsDirect Materials per UnitTotal Direct Labor Costenter a number of unitsenter a number of unitsselect a closing production budget item Cost per PoundTotal Direct Labor CostRequired Production UnitsDirect Materials PurchasesDirect Labor Time per UnitBeginning Finished Goods UnitsDirect Materials per UnitBeginning Direct MaterialsTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsDesired Ending Direct MaterialsTotal Materials RequiredExpected Unit SalesTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Required Unitsenter a total number of unitsenter a total number of unitsenter a total number of unitseTextbook and MediaPrepare the direct materials budget. (Round Cost per pound answers to 2 decimal places, e.g. 52.70.)COOK FARM SUPPLY COMPANYDirect Materials Budget—Gummchoose the accounting period For the Six Months Ending June 30, 2020For the Quarter Ending June 30, 2020June 30, 2020QuarterSixMonths12select an opening direct materials budget item Total Materials RequiredTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Direct Labor CostBeginning Finished Goods UnitsDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Required UnitsTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesUnits to be ProducedDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Materials PurchasesExpected Unit SalesCost per PoundBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Total Pounds Needed for ProductionDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsDirect Materials per Unitenter a number of unitsenter a number of unitsselect an item Total Direct Labor CostUnits to be ProducedTotal Required Direct Labor HoursBeginning Finished Goods UnitsDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitTotal Required UnitsDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Expected Unit SalesTotal Materials RequiredDirect Materials PurchasesBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Labor Cost per HourCost per PoundDirect Materials per UnitTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Finished Goods Unitsenter the amount of poundsenter the amount of poundsselect a summarizing line for the first part Beginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDirect Labor Cost per HourUnits to be ProducedDirect Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Total Required Direct Labor HoursDirect Materials per UnitCost per PoundTotal Direct Labor CostTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionTotal Required UnitsExpected Unit SalesTotal Materials RequiredBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Desired Ending Finished Goods Unitsenter a total amount of pounds for the first partenter a total amount of pounds for the first partselect between addition and deduction AddLess: select an item Total Pounds Needed for ProductionTotal Required UnitsTotal Required Direct Labor HoursDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Materials RequiredUnits to be ProducedCost per PoundDirect Materials per UnitTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Beginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Labor Cost per HourTotal Direct Labor CostExpected Unit SalesDirect Materials PurchasesBeginning Finished Goods Unitsenter the amount of poundsenter the amount of poundsselect a summarizing line for the second part Desired Ending Finished Goods UnitsDirect Materials PurchasesTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesBeginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionDirect Materials per UnitTotal Required Direct Labor HoursExpected Unit SalesTotal Materials RequiredUnits to be ProducedBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Desired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Total Required UnitsCost per PoundDirect Labor Cost per HourDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitTotal Direct Labor Costenter a total amount of pounds for the second partenter a total amount of pounds for the second partselect between addition and deduction AddLess: select an item Cost per PoundDirect Materials PurchasesDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Total Pounds Needed for ProductionTotal Required UnitsDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Units to be ProducedBeginning Finished Goods UnitsExpected Unit SalesTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Direct Labor CostDirect Materials per UnitTotal Materials Requiredenter the amount of poundsenter the amount of poundsselect a summarizing line for the third part Total Required UnitsDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Materials PurchasesCost per PoundUnits to be ProducedDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Direct Labor CostDirect Materials per UnitTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Expected Unit SalesDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsBeginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesTotal Materials Requiredenter a total amount of pounds for the third partenter a total amount of pounds for the third partselect an item Total Materials RequiredDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesCost per PoundUnits to be ProducedTotal Required Direct Labor HoursDirect Materials per UnitTotal Required UnitsBeginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDirect Materials PurchasesTotal Direct Labor CostDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Expected Unit Sales$enter a dollar amount $enter a dollar amount select a closing direct materials budget item Direct Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDirect Labor Cost per HourExpected Unit SalesDirect Materials PurchasesUnits to be ProducedTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Direct Labor CostTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionTotal Required UnitsBeginning Finished Goods UnitsDirect Materials per UnitCost per PoundBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Total Materials RequiredDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)$enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount Prepare the direct labor budget. (Enter Direct labor time per unit in proportion to hours, e.g. for 45 minutes the proportion will be 0.75.)
COOK FARM SUPPLY COMPANYDirect Labor Budgetchoose the accounting period For the Six Months Ending June 30, 2020For the Quarter Ending June 30, 2020June 30, 2020QuarterSixMonths12select an opening labor budget item Direct Labor Time (Hours) per UnitUnits to be ProducedTotal Direct Labor CostTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDirect Materials per UnitDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Beginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Materials RequiredCost per PoundDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Required UnitsBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Materials PurchasesExpected Unit SalesDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Pounds Needed for Productionenter a number of unitsenter a number of unitsselect a labor budget item Beginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDirect Materials per UnitTotal Direct Labor CostUnits to be ProducedExpected Unit SalesTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesTotal Required UnitsBeginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Materials RequiredCost per PoundTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionDirect Labor Cost per HourTotal Required Direct Labor Hoursenter a number of hoursenter a number of hoursselect a summarizing line for the first part Desired Ending Finished Goods UnitsTotal Materials RequiredTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesTotal Required UnitsCost per PoundExpected Unit SalesDirect Materials PurchasesTotal Direct Labor CostUnits to be ProducedTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Materials per UnitDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Direct Labor Cost per HourBeginning Finished Goods Unitsenter a total number of hours for the first partenter a total number of hours for the first partselect a labor budget item Cost per PoundDirect Labor Cost per HourDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesTotal Required UnitsDirect Materials per UnitUnits to be ProducedBeginning Direct Materials (Pounds)Total Direct Labor CostBeginning Finished Goods UnitsTotal Pounds Needed for ProductionDirect Materials PurchasesTotal Materials RequiredDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Expected Unit SalesTotal Required Direct Labor Hours$enter a dollar amount $enter a dollar amount select a closing labor budget item Total Pounds Needed for ProductionTotal Required UnitsTotal Materials RequiredDirect Materials per UnitCost per PoundExpected Unit SalesBeginning Finished Goods UnitsUnits to be ProducedTotal Required Direct Labor HoursTotal Direct Labor CostTotal Cost of Direct Materials PurchasesDirect Labor Time (Hours) per UnitDirect Materials PurchasesDesired Ending Finished Goods UnitsDirect Labor Cost per HourDesired Ending Direct Materials (Pounds)Beginning Direct Materials (Pounds)$enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount Prepare the selling and administrative expense budget.
COOK FARM SUPPLY COMPANYSelling and Administrative Expense Budgetchoose the accounting period June 30, 2020For the Six Months Ending June 30, 2020For the Quarter Ending June 30, 2020QuarterSixMonths12select an item Variable CostTotalFixed CostBudgeted sales in unitsenter a total number of unitsenter a total number of unitsenter a total number of units select an item Fixed CostTotalVariable CostBudgeted sales in units$enter a dollar amount $enter a dollar amount $enter a dollar amount select an item Fixed CostBudgeted sales in unitsTotalVariable Costenter a dollar amountenter a dollar amountenter a dollar amountselect a closing budget item Fixed CostBudgeted sales in unitsTotalVariable Cost$enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount $enter a total dollar amount eTextbook and MediaPrepare the budgeted multiple-step income statement for the first 6 months. (Round intermediate calculations to 2 decimal places and final answer to 0 decimal places, e.g. 1,255.)COOK FARM SUPPLY COMPANYBudgeted Income Statementchoose the accounting period For the Six Months Ending June 30, 2020June 30, 2020For the Quarter Ending June 30, 2020select an income statement item Selling and Administrative ExpensesOperating ExpensesIncome from OperationsGross ProfitNet Income / (Loss)PurchasesEnding InventoryInterest ExpenseBeginning InventoryIncome Tax ExpenseTotal Operating ExpensesSalesIncome Before Income TaxCost of Goods Sold$enter a dollar amount select an income statement item Ending InventoryOperating ExpensesSelling and Administrative ExpensesBeginning InventoryTotal Operating ExpensesIncome from OperationsPurchasesCost of Goods SoldGross ProfitNet Income / (Loss)Interest ExpenseIncome Before Income TaxIncome Tax ExpenseSalesenter a dollar amountselect a summarizing line for the first part Cost of Goods SoldNet Income / (Loss)Income Tax ExpenseSalesIncome from OperationsSelling and Administrative ExpensesInterest ExpensePurchasesBeginning InventoryTotal Operating ExpensesIncome Before Income TaxOperating ExpensesEnding InventoryGross Profitenter a total amount for the first partselect an income statement item Income Before Income TaxSalesBeginning InventoryInterest ExpensePurchasesNet Income / (Loss)Ending InventoryGross ProfitCost of Goods SoldOperating ExpensesSelling and Administrative ExpensesIncome from OperationsIncome Tax ExpenseTotal Operating Expensesenter a dollar amountselect a summarizing line for the second part Total Operating ExpensesNet Income / (Loss)Gross ProfitCost of Goods SoldSelling and Administrative ExpensesSalesIncome Before Income TaxEnding InventoryIncome from OperationsInterest ExpenseIncome Tax ExpenseBeginning InventoryOperating ExpensesPurchasesenter a total amount for the second partselect an income statement item Net Income / (Loss)Interest ExpenseIncome Tax ExpenseSelling and Administrative ExpensesPurchasesOperating ExpensesIncome from OperationsBeginning InventoryCost of Goods SoldSalesEnding InventoryIncome Before Income TaxTotal Operating ExpensesGross Profitenter a dollar amountselect a summarizing line for the third part Ending InventoryPurchasesIncome Tax ExpenseOperating ExpensesCost of Goods SoldNet Income / (Loss)Income from OperationsSelling and Administrative ExpensesSalesBeginning InventoryInterest ExpenseIncome Before Income TaxGross ProfitTotal Operating Expensesenter a total amount for the third partselect an income statement item Net Income / (Loss)Gross ProfitInterest ExpenseOperating ExpensesEnding InventoryBeginning InventorySalesIncome Before Income TaxIncome from OperationsSelling and Administrative ExpensesCost of Goods SoldIncome Tax ExpensePurchasesTotal Operating Expensesenter a dollar amountselect a closing name for the budgeted income statement PurchasesSalesIncome from OperationsCost of Goods SoldNet Income / (Loss)Ending InventoryTotal Operating ExpensesOperating ExpensesSelling and Administrative ExpensesIncome Before Income TaxIncome Tax ExpenseInterest ExpenseBeginning InventoryGross Profit$enter a total net income or loss amount eTextbook and MediaSave for Later
ACC 561 Strayer University Accounting of Cook Farm Supply Company Worksheet

Our assignment for the week is a minimum 450-word initial discussion board post and a minimum of 2 100-word minimum responses. This week navigate to the Visualizing Data ( https://www.visualisingdata.com/ ) website and click on resources and then click on the colour tab.  This site is managed by the author of the textbook.  Pick one option and note it by the name in the website.  For example “ HTML Color Picker”.  Then note what it is, when you would use it.  Next, find a website that uses the method or should use the method.  Explain why. In response to peers, continue the conversation by agreeing or disagreeing with the color method selected. Explain your thoughts. Your work must be entirely original, checked with Grammarly, and make use of proper grammatical conventions.

amiga, psychology assignment help

amiga, psychology assignment help.

Please respond in 5 sentences or more.Hello,My name is Huiwen Mattingley. I was born in Shanghai, China. I live in Japan with my husband and two beautiful girls. We enjoy the food- Sushi and weather here. I work for the Child Development Center on Naval Base. In the past 10 years, I have worked with different age groups. I feel I can learn so many things from children. I think this is the most rewarding job. Currently, I am taking college classes for my BA in Early Childhood Education Administration. I hope one day that I will become a center Director and share my knowledge with others.I think the statement of “If you plan to teach, you are almost guaranteed to have students with disabilities in your classroom, regardless of your teaching assignment” is true. All children are different. They all have their like and dislike. When children is not interested in one subject, they will simply refuse to receive information during the learning process. In long term, this can cause their certain skills developmentally delay. With this in mind, I would like to learn how to identify those children with disabilities that is not visible to others and how to assist them to develop age appropriately.Usually when working with children with disabilities, people always over protect them. Staff won’t treat them equal as the regular children just because they have disabilities. Here are some concerns I have. I have seen staff mark those children in front of others. They will tell other children that they cannot play with the child with disability because the child can move freely like the others. This is not help although the staff just doesn’t want the child with disability to get hurt. But the action discouraged the child to develop social/emotional skills. I have seen group children laugh at the child wearing glasses. The action doesn’t help the children with disabilities to recognize what they are and be proud of themselves.When we working with students with disabilities, it brings more challenges because we won’t just educate one child but the whole class on the interaction with someone with disabilities. I have see many staff striving to provide better care for those children. As long as we put our efforts in, the outcome will be rewarding.
amiga, psychology assignment help

The development paradigm and gift-giving Research Paper

help writing The development paradigm and gift-giving Research Paper. Even though that there is much of a moralistically sounding vagueness to the description of what the partners for Global Community Kelowna do, it is still possible to identify the actual scope of these organizations’ activities: Dare to Be This organization consists of ‘soccer moms’, who due to being particularly ‘bright’, do believe that it is indeed possible to provide the community with ‘fair-trade products at a fair price’. Despite the fact that the GCK’s web site does not mention the definition of what the notion of a ‘fair-trade product’ stands for, we can well assume that this notion has to do with the concerned women’s naïve belief that, for as long a particular product features a ‘sweatshop free’ logo, this is indeed being the case. Fullstop This particular organization is ‘dedicated to stopping injustice against women’ through education. In other words, its activities are concerned with raising money, in order to promote the self-evident idea that mistreating women is wrong. The description of what this organization does, tactfully avoids mentioning whether the Lombrosian types of men, predetermined to abuse women on a genetic level, can be ‘educated’ to act otherwise. Gifts to Grandmothers The members of this organization, who are being obviously just as ‘bright’, as the members of Dare to Be, sew and sell handbags, in time free from bellyful idling. The obtained money they transfer to the elderly women in Nigeria and Ethiopia, while expecting that this will indeed help the latter to raise the swarms of their orphaned (due to the ongoing civil war ) grandchildren, and to consequently send them to the Harvard university. Global Citizens for Change This organization sends volunteers to the Third world countries, so that they can enlighten the impoverished locals on the benefits of ‘democracy’, take photographs of themselves in front of the slums (the so-called ‘extreme tourism’), come back to Canada and take pride in having made the world a ‘better place’. Hope for the Nations This organization is dedicated to ensuring the ‘reduction of poverty’ and promoting ‘gender equity’, across the world. As the GCK’s description implies, this is being achieved by the mean of the organization’s members holding conferences, during the course of which they congratulate themselves on having made a ‘difference’, while taking advantage of the conveniently situated smorgasbords with food – the most important element of this type of conferences. Despite the fact that the activities of earlier mentioned organizations imply the concerned individuals’ ‘selfishness’, this is far from being the actual case – at least in the psychological sense of this word. By affiliating themselves with the agenda of making the world a ‘better place’, the members of these organizations strive to attain the sensation of an emotional comfort with what they are, as their foremost priority – pure and simple. There are a number of discursive parallels can be drawn between these people, on the one hand, and the self-righteous bible thumpers, on the other (Anniah 63). After all, it is specifically their subliminal realization of their personal guilt for the fact that there is much of an injustice in the world, which causes both: ‘development activists’ and bible thumpers to indulge in charitable activities, in the first place. By doing it, they are able to reestablish themselves as thoroughly ‘moral’ individuals in their own eyes. What it means is that the activities of ‘gift giving’, on the part of the earlier mentioned organizations, are not being de facto concerned with helping people in the Third world. Rather, these activities are concerned with helping ‘gift givers’ to suppress their deep-seated realization that the reason why they are able to lead a bellyful existence in Canada (the US), is that the Third world continues to suffer from poverty. This is exactly why, as time goes on, impoverished people in ‘developing’ countries grow increasingly angry about the sheer hypocrisy of their presumed ‘beneficiaries’. As the Nigerian car washer David Kabala pointed out: “They (Western ‘development activists’) see us as puppets; they want to come and take pictures, have a little walk, tell their friends they’ve been to the worst slum in Africa. But nothing changes for us” (Warah 6). This simply could not be otherwise – despite all of the well-meaning rhetoric, on the part of the UN bureaucrats, which continue to promote the idea that providing the Third world countries with ‘aid’ is the way to put them on the path of progress, people are becoming increasingly aware of this idea’s counterproductive essence. The reason for this is quite apparent – this ‘aid’ reflects the Western countries’ intention to keep concealed the fact that, contrary to what it is being commonly assumed, their richness is nothing but the by-product of Westerners’ continual endowment with the colonial mentality. After all, it does not represent any secret that, ever since 1971, the US currency had ceased to represent any objective value, whatsoever, while being turned into essentially the tons of a valueless green paper (nowadays, it is rather the bunch of digital zeroes in the FRS’s main computer). Yet, it is specifically this currency (the US dollar), with which the Western world pays ‘developing’ countries, in exchange for their natural and human resources. In the similar manner, Spanish and later British colonists used to buy land from the American Natives, in exchange for glass-beads. Therefore, the Western practice of providing the Third world countries with ‘aid’/’gifts’, while these countries are being robbed clean by the Western transnational corporations, is a hypocrisy of the worst kind. Being strongly hypocritical, this practice cannot possibly result in the improvement of living standards among the world’s most impoverished people. Quite on the contrary – it results in the ‘aid’ recipients adopting the mentality of beggars, which are doomed to rely on others, while trying to meet the ends. In its turn, this causes the ‘poor and needy’ to become ever more resentful of their moralistically minded ‘beneficiaries’. In this respect, it would prove quite impossible to disagree with Bindra, who suggested that: “Far from being productive or necessary, the donor-dependant relationship most often ends in mutual hatred. And amid the final acrimony, one crucial fact is forgotten: the longer the relationship has carried on, the less capable the dependant is of reducing his dependence” (149). This explains the phenomenon of legal and illegal immigrants from the Third world continuing to arrive to the Westen shores in big numbers, despite remaining deeply resentful of the so-called ‘Western values’. These people are perfectly aware that in their own countries, they do not have even a slight chance of a social advancement, by definition, which in turn is the direct consequence of the West’s ‘well-meaning’ geopolitical arrogance. This, of course, once again exposes the sheer fallaciousness of the assumption that by throwing ‘crumbs’ to people that have to struggle with hunger on a daily basis from their richly served ‘smorgasbords’ (in the allegorical sense of this word), philanthropically-minded Canadians (Westerners) would be able to make a difference. Instead of crying crocodile tears about the ‘poor and needy’ in Africa, they should spend more time ‘making a difference’ in their own countries. As Anniah pointed out in his another article: “Forget the starving children of Africa and Asia, if you can. Wherever you live in the West, there are children’s lives to be saved in your own country” (159). Yet, this is highly unlikely to happen, because, as it was implied earlier, the officially proclaimed agenda of trying to ‘help the world’, on the part of the Canadian ‘ gift-givers’ from GCK, is nothing but the extrapolation of their subliminal desire to feel better about themselves – nothing else. In light of what has been said earlier, the suggestion that the GCK’s agenda is being concerned with ‘reinforcing the development paradigm’ does not make any sense, whatsoever. After all, as we have already pointed out, the organization’s activities are essentially charitable. Yet, the belief that charity is the key to development/prosperity can be defined as utterly arrogant, at best: “The entire aid industry is based on a demonstrable fallacy: that aid can stimulate economic growth. No country on earth has ever been developed solely by aid” (Mwangi 155). What GCK actually does, is taking advantage of citizens’ gullibility, by making them to donate to a number of different ‘charitable causes’, such as the cause of ‘combating hunger in Africa’, for example. In this respect, GCK is being no different from the rest of the charity-scams, which allow pretentiously moralistic con artists, in charge of running them, to make good money. The very fact that in Canada, the financial transactions concerned with charitable activities are deemed tax-deductible, creates objective preconditions for this to be the case. It is understood, of course, that the GCK’s functioning is not entirely pointless, as it does provide the affiliated individuals with the illusion that their involvement with the organization benefits the humanity, but this is about it. What this organization’s active participants do not seem to understand is that, if any, it is namely the Canadian society, where the proportion of marijuana-smoking degenerates increases exponentially to the flow of time, which is being much more legitimate subject of a ‘humanitarian intervention’, as compared to the impoverished societies of the Third world. After all, within the matter of the last twenty years, the population of Ethiopia has tripled – despite the fact that, throughout this time, Ethiopians continued to suffer from the never-ending civil war and famine. Perceptually ‘feminized’ Canadians, on the other hand, grow ever more incapable of addressing even the most basic life-challenges – despite the fact that their country features the world’s highest standards of living. This is because, as compared to the Canadian society of self-indulgent whiners, which ceased evolving, the Ethiopian society is blessed with the Darwinian vitality, which in turn allows its members to successfully deal even with the most unimaginable hardships – without needing to be ‘helped’ by those who indirectly contribute to these hardships. Thus, it will only be logical to conclude this paper by suggesting that the very existence of GCK proves the validity of an old saying that the road to hell is made out of good intentions. Works Cited Anniah, Kwame. “Moral Disagreement” Anniah, Kwame. “Kindness to Strangers” Bindra, Sunny. “Men Behaving Badly.” Missionaries, Mercenaries and Misfits: An Anthology. Ed. Rasna Warah. London: AuthorHouse, 2008. 147-155. Print. Mwangi, Maina. “Why Aid has Failed Africa so Spectacularly.” Missionaries, Mercenaries and Misfits: An Anthology. Ed. Rasna Warah. London: AuthorHouse, 2008. 155-163. Print. Warah, Rasna. “The Development Myth.” Missionaries, Mercenaries and Misfits: An Anthology. Ed. Rasna Warah. London: AuthorHouse, 2008. 3-23. Print. The development paradigm and gift-giving Research Paper

Saint Leo University Diversity and Growth

Saint Leo University Diversity and Growth.

Look at the PowerPoint and add detailed notes to my slides that have my name “RENEE” on them ONLY. DO NOT ADD NOTES TO SLIDES WITH OTHER NAMES, those are my group members slides and their responsibility. You will need to refer to our final paper in order to write notes on my slides, BUT DO NOT JUST COPY AND PASTE FROM THE PAPER IN THE NOTES SECTION OF THE SLIDES!PLEASE ENSURE YOU RELATE TO THE PAPER FOR MY SLIDES!!! This is very important YOU WILL ALS FORMULATE A CONCLUSION FOR THE ENTIRE POWERPOIINT PRESENTATION CONCLUDING ALL MAIN POINTS
Saint Leo University Diversity and Growth

HIST 108 Grossmont CCCD Colonialism in the United States of America Discussion

HIST 108 Grossmont CCCD Colonialism in the United States of America Discussion.

DO NOT COPY FROM GOOGLE AND NO REFRENCE. USE YOUR OWN WORD 100%.Write a summary of two of the three videos and in the summary(depending on the videos you choose describe the important of Benjamin Franklin in colonial history- show what life was life in colonial America and Virginia- show the important of P.T. Barnum in our national culture. You need to write at least two fairly long paragraphs per summary using the material from the videos in your summary assignment.
HIST 108 Grossmont CCCD Colonialism in the United States of America Discussion