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complete the 14 case studies see directions below in full detail and attached clusters to use

Using the Cluster slides attached complete the 14 case studies “Symptoms” and “Possible Diagnosis” making sure spelling and grammar are correct.. Answer 1-14 cases. Chapter 13 Psychology in Everyday Life 4th edition (see attached if needed).

Please type in your answers for each “Symptoms” and “Possible Diagnosis” and make sure spelling and grammar are correct.

Case Study: Cinderella

Cinderella is living happily with her mother and father until her mother dies. Cinderella’s father remarries a cold, cruel woman who has two daughters, Drizella and Anastasia. When the father dies, Cinderella’s wicked stepmother turns her into a virtual servant in her own house. When Cinderella’s dad died she was left a fear of being abandoned again and a cruel stepmother and stepsisters. However bad her evil stepmother was, Cinderella didn’t leave. She spent all day cleaning, sewing, and cooking and lost faith in herself. She was dependent and submissive until she’s given help by her Fairy Godmother (another caregiver), until she’s finally passed on to the prince so he can take care of her. Cinderella even gets a bunch of mice to dictate her decisions for her.

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Case Study: Ariel

Ariel’s the outcast as far as her sisters are concerned, and her dad acknowledges that she’s always getting into trouble. Ariel was always searching for human treasures (i.e. thingamabobs) and had a stash deep beneath the sea. Ariel experienced distress at the thought of getting rid of her treasures, regardless of their actual value, and when her dad wrecks her stash of items, she totally loses it. She even neglects her responsibilities to her family to collect more items for her obsession. Ariel also expresses severe discontent for her mermaid tail. Ariel spends a vast amount of time desiring legs instead of a tail as she observes humans above the surface. She goes to extreme measures for the removal of her tail by visiting Ursula and surrendering her voice in exchange for three days with legs.

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Case Study: Rapunzel

Rapunzel is kidnapped as a baby by Gothel and raised as her own daughter in an isolated tower. While unknowingly being held hostage she starts to feel emotionally bonded to her captor. Mother Gothel is exceptionally passive aggressive and emotionally abusive toward her adopted daughter (making it quite clear that she only values her for her magical hair). Even after finding out about all of her lies and deceit, however, Rapunzel still feels feelings of guilt and love surrounding Mother Gothel, and it’s written all over her face during the scene where Mother Gothel falls out of the tower and to her death.

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Case Study: Pocahontas

Pocahontas incited wars, caused love triangles, convinced her dad (and her whole tribe for that matter) to do things her way, and dramatically threw herself on top of John Smith every chance she gets, even right on a cliff before Smith’s execution. She needed others to witness her emotional displays in order to get attention. Her best friend was also a spiritual talking magical tree (very theatrical). Are her dramatic heroic acts, really more of a manipulative ploy to get the attention that she craves.

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Case Study: Beauty

Beautiful and intelligent Belle was forced to stay in an abandoned castle with her kidnapper until she fell in love with him, and fell in love with him she did. The Beast’s bad temper, abusive demeanor, insistence on pretty much keeping slaves, and lack of social etiquette vastly outweighed his relatively few “sweet moments,” which have led tons to believe that Belle formed this bond with her captor in order to cope with the fact that she was taken from her home and forbidden to return. And even after earning her freedom she still returns to protect her abusive capture.

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Case Study: Elsa

Elsa attempts to “conceal” – both her emotions and herself. After her parents’ death, she hides away in her room of the castle. She locks the doors, refuses to let anyone in, and even distances herself from her sister, Anna. She then moves to an even more remote home – an ice castle on the side of some godforsaken mountain. Elsa almost kills Anna while they’re playing as children, as well as her parents’ response to the incident. Her isolation and separation from the world seem to be related to the traumatic events of her upbringing and fear of hurting those she loves.

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Case Study: Mulan

Mulan doesn’t fit in at home, where she’s expected to be a submissive wife, so she decides she’s going to “win back her family’s honor” by joining the army and conquering the Huns. Only issue is, she doesn’t fit in there, either, because she is a female. In just about every scene, Mulan is bumbling around, trying desperately hard to say and do the right thing, but to no avail. At least she seems to have a shred of confidence by the end, after the Emperor of China pats her on the back.

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Case Study: Anna

Anna is jumping on couches, stuffing chocolate in her face, tripping over everything, getting excited over things like windows and salad plates, talking way too quickly, and accepting a proposal from a dude she met roughly three hours prior. She is always interrupting normal conversations, even songs. She interrupts to mention sandwiches in one of them.It seems that she is very hyperactive and impulsive.

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Case Study: Jasmine

Jasmine engages in risk behavior, this includes things like hopping on a flying carpet with a stranger, running away from home, and stealing an apple like it’s no big deal. She has a unusual mood shift and is also spending ample time verbally harassing potential husbands until they leave (annoyed easily), talking to her best and only friend (a tiger), and crying on and into various different objects while feeling hopeless. She feels that she would rather die than go on without any hope of escape. Her hopeless feelings lead her to make quick and dangerous choices when she has more energy again.

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Case Study: Alice

Alice hangs out with floating cats and has full-blown conversations with caterpillars, she’s freaking out about the Queen of Hearts cutting off her head all the time, her whole body seemingly grows and shrinks to different sizes, and she’s pretty convinced that this world is real, despite all the illogical stuff happening around her. This might be the result of a pattern of experimenting with mushrooms and other unknown controlled substances.

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Case Study: Snow White

Snow White is the “fairest of them all,” and she acts like she knows it. She crashes in a house with seven dudes, seemingly loves the fact that they’re all infatuated with her, flirts with everyone like nobody’s business, and overreacts to everything. As a child her parents would either pamper her all the time or criticize her way too much. Between her royal birth parents and her evil stepmother who dressed her in rags and made her clean everything within a hundred foot radius, I’d say she had both. However, she has a hard time seeing other people’s point of view and views others as simply there to meet her needs.

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Case Study: Meg

Meg is terrified of Hercules breaking her heart, she’s got serious abandonment issues, she constantly participates in dangerous stuff like instigating monsters and trading her freedom for things, and she’s got a fair bit of an attitude on her. On top of all that, she’s really easily agitated by the people around her (like Herc, Pegasus, Phil, Hades – yeah, pretty much everyone). She tries to control others and will often create conflict and fights with even the people she cares about the most.

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Case Study: Aurora

Aurora goes for a walk in the woods, where she gets to see Prince Philip who she instantly falls in love with and wants to marry. Shortly after their encounter, she learns that she must marry someone else who she has never even met, which essentially breaks her heart. She doesn’t want to see, hear or speak to anyone anymore. She loses all of her energy and does not want to do any activities anymore that she once enjoyed. She has diminished motivation and a lack of initiative. After an incident she stays in bed all day and misses out on the lives of all of her friends and loved ones.

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Case Study: Merida

Merida’s avoidance of males had less to do with her feminine strength and more to do with her disorder. She has a failure to conform to social norms, disregard for other people’s rights, a tendency to bend all the rules, and a tendency to lie. Merida’s distances herself from her parents and culture as she gets older. She even tries to poison her mother and brothers in an attempt to free herself from her cultural expectations. She goes around destroying family valuables and tries to hurt animals. She is unsafe to be around even though she is a good leader and can be very charismatic

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