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Complete Business Law Assignment NO PLAGIARISM

Complete Business Law Assignment NO PLAGIARISM.

DuressJohnny, the CEO of Plastic Spoon Inc., is in a bit of a bind. His daughter was kidnapped. The kidnappers are demanding a hefty ransom. Unfortunately for Johnny, he cannot afford the ransom. So, Johnny withdraws the ransom money from Plastic Spoon’s account, and he pays the kidnappers. After returning with his daughter, the directors of the corporation notice the missing funds. The directors report the loss to the police. The directors suspect that Johnny misappropriated the funds, and they tell the police about their suspicions. The police search Johnny’s home without a warrant. They find a letter Johnny was writing that confirms that Johnny took the money for the corporation to pay the kidnappers. The police arrest Johnny, and he is charged with theft. Johnny is charged with embezzlement.The elements of embezzlement in this state are: The intentional taking of money or property by a CEO or other top official in a corporation without consent.Are the elements of embezzlement present in this fact pattern? What affirmative defenses can Johnny raise? Can Johnny get the letter seized by the police suppressed? Why? The requirements below must be met for your paper to be accepted and graded: Write between 500 – 750 words (approximately 2 – 3 pages) using Microsoft Word.Attempt APA style, see example below.Use font size 12 and 1” margins.Include cover page and reference page.At least 60% of your paper must be original content/writing.No more than 40% of your content/information may come from references.Use at least two references from outside the course material, preferably from EBSCOhost. Text book, lectures, and other materials in the course may be used, but are not counted toward the two reference requirement.Reference material (data, dates, graphs, quotes, paraphrased words, values, etc.) must be identified in the paper and listed on a reference page.Reference material (data, dates, graphs, quotes, paraphrased words, values, etc.) must come from sources such as, scholarly journals found in EBSCOhost, online newspapers such as The Wall Street Journal, government websites, etc. Sources such as Wikis, Yahoo Answers, eHow, etc. are not acceptable.
Complete Business Law Assignment NO PLAGIARISM

ENGH 302 University of Virginia Data Security Newspaper Article.

OVERVIEW The goal of this assignment is to translate a scholarly article written for your field of study for a public audience. There are three parts to this assignment: locate, read, and analyze a recently published (within the last 12-24 months) scholarly article in your academic discipline that addresses a topic of interest to you and the general public”translate” (rewrite) the article in a new genre appropriate to a public audiencewrite a reflective analysis about the choices you made as you wrote your translation LEARNING OBJECTIVES After completing this assignment, you should be able to analyze the rhetorical features of scholarly writing in your discipline and public writingIdentify the conventions of various genres of scholarly, professional, and public writingTo write with an awareness of how the rhetorical situation and rhetorical context influence the structure, language, and reference conventions (SLRs) writers use to achieve their purpose in writing to specific audiences. ASSIGNMENT STEP ONE: IDENTIFY YOUR NEW AUDIENCE AND GENRE After you choose your article, read it carefully so that you understand what it conveys. Next, identify a new audience and genre for your translation of the article. The objective is to shift the audience from an academic one to a public one. You may choose to write a magazine article to a general audience of people interested in your field, a newspaper article that reports research findings, or a press release like the student sample included in this lesson. Notice that once you change audiences, then the form in which you report will need to shift as well. The genre you produce will be contingent on the audience you’re targeting and the rhetorical context (magazine article, newspaper article, press release, etc.). STEP TWO: ANALYZING YOUR TARGET AUDIENCE AND GENRE EXPECTATIONS Closely analyze an example or two of the kind of genre you’re attempting to create and consider how those genre examples fulfill the expectations of the target audience. Your project will be assessed according to its ability to reproduce those genre expectations, so you will need to explain, in detail, the rhetorical changes and other choices you had to make in the construction of your piece. Be sure that you’re able to explain the rhetorical choices you make in writing your translation. Consider all four elements of the rhetorical context: author, audience, topic, purpose. STEP THREE: CONSTRUCTING THE GENRE At this point, you’re ready to begin constructing or translating the article into the new genre. The genre you’re producing could take any number of forms. As such, the form structure, and development of your ideas are contingent on the genre of public reporting you’re attempting to construct. If you’re constructing a magazine article, for example, then the article you produce should really look like one that would appear in a magazine. Try to mirror how the genre would appear in a real situation. STEP FOUR: WRITING THE REFLECTIVE ANALYSIS Once your translation is complete, compose a reflective analysis. As part of your analysis, consider the rhetorical choices you made as you constructed your translation. Offer a rational for each of your decisions that connects the features of your transition to your larger rhetorical context. For example, if you had to translate the title of the scholarly article for a public audience, explain why your new title is the most appropriate on for your public audience. Failure to include a good faith response in the reflective analysis results in an automatic 10-point deduction (or one letter grade) in grade. EVIDENCE The Discipline Project does not require you to incorporate secondary sources, but if you feel it is appropriate to your reader and the genre you chose, then do so. Just make sure to include a references page at the end of the essay. It is more important to think about how you will incorporate evidence from the scholarly article you are translating. Public audiences appreciate a quotation or two, but you will find that you need to rely more heavily on summary and paraphrase in translating the article for a general reader. Summary and paraphrase sometimes require citations depending on the chosen genre. FORMAT AND DOCUMENTATION CITE all information that does not originate with you. Use the format/design for the genre you chose that is appropriate for your public audienceUse the documentation style and manuscript format for your chosen public genre. If not otherwise included, a link to the scholarly article being translated should be included at the end of the project.I have attached my rubric file below
ENGH 302 University of Virginia Data Security Newspaper Article

Name:KW Date:02/27/2020 Time: Age:50 y/o Sex:Female SUBJECTIVE CC: “Complaints of tiredness and body aches; the roof of the mouth hurts since Saturday and gets worse when eating; headaches; a dry cough, sneezing, and fever are present” HPI: The patient complains of tiredness, body aches, pain in the roof of the mouth observed since Saturday, and getting worse when eating, headaches, a dry cough, sneezing, and fever. The patient is negative for anxiety, arthritis, asthma, DPH, problems with the back, breast cancer, COPD, CAD, CHF, high cholesterol levels, cancer, dementia, depression, dermatitis, diabetes, epilepsy, GERD, glaucoma, gout, HIV, hepatitis, pneumonia, renal stone, stroke, TB, thyroid problems, and an ulcer (GI). The patient is positive for migraine, headache, hypertension, and anemia. Medications: Norvasc (hypertension, 10 mg/day) PMH: The patient is negative for diabetes, peptic ulcer disease, lung disease, asthma, TB, cancer, kidney disease, thyroid problems, and psychiatric diagnosis. The patient is positive for HTN. Allergies: No allergies Medication Intolerances: No medication intolerances Chronic Illnesses/Major Traumas: HTN Hospitalizations/Surgeries: No hospitalizations/surgeries Family History – Social History – ROS General Reports fever, tiredness, headache. Denies chills, weight change, fatigue, declines in an energy level, sweats. Cardiovascular Reports HTN. Denies chest pain, palpitations, PND, orthopnea, edema, varicose veins, heart attacks, rheumatic symptoms. Skin Denies rashes, bruising, dryness, bleeding or skin discolorations, changes in lesions or moles, nails. Respiratory Reports a dry cough and sneezing. Denies asthma, wheezing, bronchitis, TB, hemoptysis, dyspnea, pneumonia. Eyes Denies blurring, visual changes of any kind, excessive tearing, eyeglasses use, pain, cataracts, glaucoma. Gastrointestinal Denies abdominal pain, constipation, N/V/D, jaundice, hepatitis, changes in stools, hemorrhoids, eating disorders, ulcers, liver disease. Ears Denies discharge, ear pain, hearing impairment and loss, infections, ringing in ears. Genitourinary/Gynecological Denies urgency, changes in the color of urine and frequency, vaginal discharge, pregnancy. Nose/Mouth/Throat Reports soreness of the mouth and throat. Denies nose bleeds and discharge, frequent colds, nasal obstruction, dysphagia, dental disease, and bleeding gums, hoarseness. Musculoskeletal Denies arthritis, back pain, joint swelling, stiffness or pain, fracture, osteoporosis, muscle stiffness. Breast Denies SBE problems, lumps, bumps, any changes, discharge. Neurological Denies syncope, seizures, transient paralysis, dizziness, head injuries, weakness. Heme/Lymph/Endo Reports anemia. Denies HIV status, bruising, blood transfusion, night sweats, swollen glands, increased thirst and hunger, cold/heat intolerance. Psychiatric Denies anxiety, depression, insomnia, suicidal ideations, mood, and behavioral changes. OBJECTIVE Weight BMI Temp 98.1 BP 140/80 Height Pulse 75 Resp O2sat 96% room air General Appearance The patient is alert, awake, well-developed, well-nourished, and well-groomed, with no acute distress. Skin Skin is brown, warm, dry, clean, intact; no rashes, lesions. HEENT Head: normocephalic, atraumatic, without lesions; facial contours are normal. Eyes: no lesions, scleral injection, PERRLA. Ears: no lesions or masses. Nose: nasal mucosa congested. Neck: supple, full ROM, no occipital nodes. The teeth are in good repair. Cardiovascular S1, S2 with regular rate/rhythm. No extra sounds. No edema. Respiratory Asymmetric chest wall, regular respirations, lungs are clear. The patient does not use the accessory muscles of respiration. Gastrointestinal The abdomen is normal, soft, non-tender, no masses. Breast No masses, tenderness, discharge, or dimpling. Genitourinary No tenderness, lesions, masses. Musculoskeletal Full ROM, no pain in joints. Neurological Gait is normal, speech is clear, posture is erect. Psychiatric The patient is alert and well-oriented, maintains eye contact. The mood is neutral. Lab Tests– Special Tests Influenza Assay with Optic (influenza A, B negative) Diagnosis Differential Diagnoses 1- Pain in the throat (R07.0) 2- Acute nasopharyngitis (J00) 3- Acute pharyngitis, unspecified (J02.9) Diagnosis Acute maxillary sinusitis, unspecified (J01.00) Acute upper respiratory infection, unspecified (J06.9) Plan/Therapeutics Plan: Further testing: Tests for determining bacterial sensitivity and radiography are possible if there are no positive effects of the prescribed treatment. Thus, “radiological tests, such as plain X-ray and computed tomography, may aid the diagnosis” (Baker
EDU 7130 Ashford University Psychology Educational Organization Discussion.

Prior to completing this discussion read Chapter 5 in Bush (2011) and Chapter 1 in Pennington (2009).Initial Post: Create an initial response that addresses the following:Identify an educational organization with whom you are associated or look for an educational organization to be studied using the ProQuest Newsstand. This organization will be the educational environment you’ll use for your final paper.Please share generic information about the setting including:Grade levels (early childhood, elementary, middle grades, secondary, post-secondary, graduate, etc.),Who works there (faculty, administration, staff),Faculty and staff demographics,Student demographics,Socio-economic status,Extra-curricular activities,Any other relevant details you feel are needed to help fully describe the environment.Once you have defined your environment, describe three theories that will help you to better address problems that you have experienced or have addressed within the environment. Use the Makolandra et al (2009) article and Bess, J.L., & Dee, J.R. (2012) book for examples of how theories have been used in practice.Your initial post should be at least 350 words.Guided Response: Post responses to at least two classmates. In your response, reflect on your classmate’s responses. Questions you might consider in your response include:Have your classmates created a clear and detailed picture of their selected educational organization?How well do the selected theories address the problems within the environment?For deeper engagement and learning, you are encouraged to provide responses to any comments or questions to you to further the conversation while giving you opportunities to develop a sense of community with class peers and the instructor.
EDU 7130 Ashford University Psychology Educational Organization Discussion

Recruitment and Selection Methods in Tesco

Introduction: Recruitment and Selection Process is one of the basic HR Processes. Recruitment and Selection is very sensitive as many managers have a need to hire a new employee and this process is always under a strict monitoring from their side. Recruitment and selection are two most important functions of personnel management. Recruitment process can be done in many ways like internal or external, and it involves with many steps of recruitment policies like job advert, job application process, Evaluations, job description and, legislations and training. The primary purpose of recruitment and selection is to achieve one’s desire end, appointing the right person to the right job. Recruitment refers to the process of attracting, screening, and selecting qualified people for a job at an organization or firm. Selection refers to Selection is the process of choosing the most suitable candidates from those who apply for the job. It is a process of offering jobs to desired candidates. This report focuses on recruitment and selection of TESCO plc. The main objective of this report is to critically analyse the recruitment and selection method applied in relation to market environment 1.2 Tesco’s background: Business of the company Tesco sells daily necessary things like food and also non food items. It carries more than 23,000 items ranging from cloths, stationary, groceries, wine, entertainment

research question/sub-questions, rationale, definitions and hypothesis

best assignment help research question/sub-questions, rationale, definitions and hypothesis.

Please see attached Example.doc for guidelines. The research questions, (minimum 4) if answered through conducting your research, would solve your problem. It must be clearly related to the problem statement and structured such that it clearly summarizes the purpose and focus of your proposed research effort. The research question should be clear, concise, definitive, unambiguous and easily understood by anyone who reads it.The rationale, is a brief summary of the need for the research study. Why is this topic being examined?Definitions are a list of the terms you believe need to be defined for this research proposal for clarity or are not commonly known terms.The hypothesis is a brief statement of what you believe is the solutions to your stated problem and/or the answer(s) to your stated research question(s) that you will be able to prove through your proposed research. The hypothesis, rationale and definitions will also comply with the following general formatting requirements:Maximum of two (2) pages in lengthTyped using a 12-point Times New Roman fontDouble-spaced throughout entire paperUse a 1 inch marginPage header will include your title and page numbersCover/Title page will include your name and the date of submission
research question/sub-questions, rationale, definitions and hypothesis

BSDR1103 Tourism Consulting Company Case Study Developmental Plan

BSDR1103 Tourism Consulting Company Case Study Developmental Plan.

ASSIGNMENT TASKS: You are working in a tourism consulting company in the Sultanate of Oman. The Ministry of Tourism asked you to help them in formulating a proposal for developing tourism in one tourism attraction that will help to attract both overseas as well as local tourists who will ultimately help to boost up the economy. Your task with your team includes the following: Constitute teamwork with 3-4 students.Select a host destination in Oman (it is preferred to select geographic area within the governorate in where your college is located).Your assignment report may include the following: Part I: Describe the current situation of the chosen place considering: Introduction: you have to introduce your chosen place considering the geographic location, population, space, economic activities and so on.The tourism product: you have to describe the components of tourism product available at the selected place in the light of 3A’s (Attractions and Activities – Amenities – Accessibility).The tourism Demand: you have to describe the tourism demand at the chosen place considering the no. of visitors, visitors’ profile (Age, Group or individual, nationality, gender…etc.) Development problems: you should collect primary data about the problem from which your chosen place is suffering from. Your method of data collection may include questionnaire, interview, and/or observation methods. The targeted population for questionnaire and interview may include international and national visitors and experts. Observation method requires a real visitation to the chosen place and taking photos as evidence. Filled questionnaire should be attached with assignment report in case of using questionnaire. Students are free to select any of the mentioned method for data collection or a mix of these methods. Development suggestions: based on the primary data collected and on your experience, you should suggest how to develop the chosen place to attract both overseas as well as local tourists who will ultimately help to boost up the economy. Your suggestions may include how to develop the supply side and how to solve problems that are related to visitors and local people at the chosen place. Marketing suggestions: based on the primary data collected and on your experience, you should suggest how to promote the chosen place to attract both overseas as well as local tourists who will ultimately help to boost up the economy. Your suggestions may include what are the promotional tools (advertising, public relation, sales promotion, personal selling) that may be used for promoting the available and suggested tourism products of the chosen place. References: All outside material used must be fully referenced at the end of your report.Referencing begins with the author, year of publication, title, publisher, and finally the page numbers. If correct referencing is not given, it will be considered an act of plagiarism and an act of cheating.Appendices: All valid questionnaires, photos and any evidence for the collection of primary data should be attached with the assignment report. Part II: Development PlanDevelopment problems: you should collect primary data about the problem from which your chosen place is suffering from. Your method of data collection may include questionnaire, interview, and/or observation methods. The targeted population for questionnaire and interview may include international and national visitors and experts. Observation method requires a real visitation to the chosen place and taking photos as evidence. Filled questionnaire should be attached with assignment report in case of using questionnaire. Students are free to select any of the mentioned method for data collection or a mix of these methods. Development suggestions: based on the primary data collected and on your experience, you should suggest how to develop the chosen place to attract both overseas as well as local tourists who will ultimately help to boost up the economy. Your suggestions may include how to develop the supply side and how to solve problems that are related to visitors and local people at the chosen place. Marketing suggestions: based on the primary data collected and on your experience, you should suggest how to promote the chosen place to attract both overseas as well as local tourists who will ultimately help to boost up the economy. Your suggestions may include what are the promotional tools (advertising, public relation, sales promotion, personal selling) that may be used for promoting the available and suggested tourism products of the chosen place. Part III: References and Appendices:References: All outside material used must be fully referenced at the end of your report. Referencing begins with the author, year of publication, title, publisher, and finally the page numbers. If correct referencing is not given, it will be considered an act of plagiarism and an act of cheating. Appendices: All valid questionnaires, photos and any evidence for the collection of primary data should be attached with the assignment report.GUIDANCE ON ASSIGNMENT WRITING is attached in the attached files.
BSDR1103 Tourism Consulting Company Case Study Developmental Plan

Role of Ministers in the UK Political System

Role of Ministers in the UK Political System. Case Study Report – UK Government Ministers This case study report will be looking at the role UK ministers play within in the UK political system, background of the role of government ministers, and the problem of ministerial overload associated with government ministers, while also discussing potential solutions Government ministers within the UK political system can be split into two categories, cabinet ministers and other ministers. Currently in 2017 there are 118 ministers, which is broken down into 1 Prime minister, 22 cabinet ministers and 95 other ministers (ministers.gov.uk). Cabinet ministers are members of parliament appointed by the prime minister (Currently Theresa May after the 2017 general election) to head up specific government departments. E.g. Michael Gove is the current cabinet minister for the department of environment, food and rural affairs. The cabinet ministers are responsible for the development of policies within their department, with help from ministers of state, parliamentary and under secretaries of state and the civil service, departments can form a policy based on external pressures such as the media and the wider electorate. A recent example is a media campaign against microbeads damaging the environment and presenting risks to human health, which lead to proposed legislation banning the sale and manufacture of microbeads in the UK (Knapton, 2017) Various factors are taken into account when the Prime minister appoints Ministers, factors include party seniority and past ministerial roles (e.g. Michael Fallon), and party loyalty or someone considered a threat to the Prime Minister. E.g. rumours of a leadership challenge against Theresa May by Boris Johnson led to his appointment as foreign secretary after she won the 2016 leadership challenge. Personal skills are also taken into account such as communication, media savviness and critical thinking. However the Prime Minister may also appoint ministers based on regional differentials and representation (e.g. Brown’s cabinet ministers consisted of 5 females, David Cameron’s cabinet after the 2015 general election had 7 females). The next part of my report I’ll be focussing on the issue of ministerial overload and the causes of ministerial. I will not only look at this problem presented to government ministers within in the UK, but also look at other countries ministers who may have experienced similar problems, while also discussing potential solutions to the problem. Ministerial overload is when a minister’s life is increasingly consumed towards their departmental work,(as stated by Laughrin’s law that states “Ministerial diaries abhor vacuum. Ministerial business automatically expands to full every minute of a minister’s day unless it is countered by a reverse irresistible force”(Foster 1999, 198)),often resulting in the deterioration of their physical and mental well being which affects both minister’s and their departments resulting in a decrease in effectiveness and efficiency within their department and other departments. Over the decades there’s been a significant increase in ministerial overload presenting a problem that not only affects government ministers in the UK but also in other countries. Scholars have identified six key pressures that affects ministers physical and mental states within their department that contributes to the problem of ministerial overload, these being instability and mobilisation, novelty, unsociability, unpredictability and accountability. ( Laughrin, 2009). I will primarily discuss the pressures of unpredictability and accountability and their contribution to ministerial overload. Unpredictability, is when some events can escalate and develop overnight with consequences that the government minister may not be aware of or hasn’t prepared a contingency plan before the event happens. Brexit is an example of an unpredictable event which has led ministerial overload. No one in the UK expected the leave side to win the referendum in June 2016, it was taken for granted that the Remain part would win that the government didn’t create a new department or have any contingency plans prepared in case leave won. After the leave party won, a completely new department was created to deal with Brexit, this contributes to ministerial overload in many ways. First is that new department was created, that means ministers and civil servants appointed to this department has zero/little experience in how to handle the department’s business. Second is that being a new department it’s more likely to be underfunded than other departments, ministers and staff will likely be underpaid which could result in a reduced efficiency within the department and potentially civil servants and staff could leave the department. To ensure the necessary funding the department needs money could be cut from other departments, this would affect the efficiency of the department or departments affected. Exiting the EU department recently has been criticised for the slow progress made in negotiations with the EU, the Daily mail has reported that the government is hiring 8,000 more civil servants and an extra £662 million pounds (Scunthorpe, 2017) in the event of a no deal Brexit. This suggests that the slow progress in negotiations is due at least in part to underfunding of the department. The third problem is co-operation between departments and the domino effect, in order of Brexit to be successful. Exiting the EU department has to work with other departments, (e.g. development strategies and international trade department). This contributes to ministerial overload because not only does the development strategies and international trade department have tons of international paper work to prioritise, read and make decisions, now they’re expected to take on extra work, working longer hours often will only a minor pay rise. This over time results in deterioration of their mental and physical wellbeing which will ultimately affect their work resulting in an increase of error/ mistakes which leads to a domino effect on other departments who are reliant on inter departmental co-operation. We can compare the above problems associated with ministerial overload to the EU countries and their handling of Brexit negotiations. The EU commission set up a department task force on article 50 negotiations with the United Kingdom, which comprises of the chief negotiator (Michael Barnier) and the deputy (Sabine Weyand) who works with other departments such as the international agreements and customs. These departments not only have to carry on with previous work prior Brexit, but also new post Brexit work, putting strains on the department’s staff and resources. Another problem is that most of the negotiations are carried out through this task force, the individual EU countries don’t have individual government departments to handle Brexit like the UK, but often the work is shared between departments such as treasuries and foreign departments which add more work ( domestic and international) onto their already time consuming work in underfunded departments. More pressure is applied to the task force because they may have to read and compromise on both individuals countries demands, but also the EU’s collective demands in the negotiations. Accountability, the second issue ministers face that contributes towards ministerial overload. Cabinet ministers are appointed by the PM to head up a department and are usually chosen based on background (such as representation of females) or based on other factors such as personal skills, e.g. media savviness. There are 2 main accountability mechanisms that affect the effectiveness of ministers, these are the ministerial code and the media. The ministerial code is a code of conduct and guidance on procedures that all ministers must uphold, which includes 7 principles of public life (selflessness, integrity, openness, leadership, objectivity and honesty), while also being accurate in their dealings with parliament disclosing any personal, financial and constituency conflicts of interest. Ministers also face individual responsibility, i.e. cabinet minister’s bear the ultimate responsibility for the actions of their ministry or department. It’s very rare nowadays for ministers in this event to resign from their post, a rare example of this would be Shahid Malik stepping down as Justice Minister in the revelations of the MP expenses scandal. They’re also subject to collective responsibility, the duty of ministers to publicly agree with government policies, ministers that cannot conform to this are expected to resign. It also refers to the responsibility of the government as a whole to be accountable for its actions, the government must be willing to resign and have a general election if defeated in a vote of no confidence.(ministerial code, gov.uk) This limits the effectiveness of ministers in their roles within departments, because if a mistake, error occurs within the department civil servants, the cabinet minister is expected to take responsibility and resign even though it may not be their direct fault, ministers therefore have to spend more time in their department to ensure these errors are not made especially in regards to department policies specifically flagship or policies with high importance or intense media scrutiny. Most democratic countries have their own forms of ministerial codes of conducts that bear some similarities with the UK. However Germany for example extends their code of conduct to all members of the Bundestag rather than just their ministers and this includes similarities to the UK, such reporting any possible conflicts of interest before taking their membership. The media is a huge mechanism that contributes towards ministerial overload. There has been an increase in scrutiny of ministers and their departments, scrutiny consisting of both the department’s policies and the individual ministers within their department. The scrutiny of department’s policies can add unwanted pressures onto departments especially in regards to current policies. If a department is part way into making a policy and the media leaks the policy and is found among the electorate to be unpopular this creates add worktime for the department to either amend the policy or completely scrap the policy which may have taken months to create. E.g. media scrutiny in the UK would be the campaign to ban micro beads in products. Another example is Australia’s tough immigration policies especially the story about pictures of refugees throwing children over boats into the water. While the media found this not true many ministerial staff then attempted to defend the immigration department’s policies by trying to discredit the media’s claims (Tieran, 2006). Another issue is the rise of personalisation politics and the scrutiny of minister’s personal lives. This adds pressure because instead of the minister being able to go home or take part in a hobby, they are constantly being investigated and scrutinised by the media for even the slightest wrongdoing, that may result in them being forced to resign or face being sacked. Ministers are being pressured into maintaining a respectable image and staffs within their department are increasingly focussing on handling the media rather than departmental work. Pressures of ministerial overload have become an increasing problem not only affecting the efficiency of ministers, departments and whole governments both in the UK and other countries. Uncertainty pressure is hard to offer a solution to because some events are out of minister’s control. However in cases such as Brexit before the referendum the current government could have created contingency plans, by creating a department, hiring extra staff, appointing extra ministers and setting aside money in preparation of the referendum result. The government can’t get rid of the ministerial code and it’s restraints on ministers, this would be highly controversial and subject to intense scrutiny as ministerial power grabbing. In terms of the media the government could pass tighter laws against the media to ensure departmental work isn’t leaked before policies are ready and pass laws restricting the media’s ability to scrutinise individual Ministers personal lives. However this would face intense scrutiny from the media with arguments ranging from freedom of information to accusations of ministers attempting to grab power while silencing critics. Ministerial overload continues to be a problem, however it’s a problem with currently very limited solutions, especially with the current fragile government only holding a slim majority, solutions need to be found and quickly to ensure future governments can work effectively and efficiently References Knapton.S,(2017) ‘Microbeads will be banned this year, Michael Gove announces in first speech as Environment Secretary’, The Telegraph, Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/07/21/microbeads-will-banned-year-michael-gove-announces-first-speech/, ( Accessed 2 November 2017) Laughrin, D, (2009) ‘Swimming for Their lives- Waving or Drowning? A review of ministerial overload and of potential remedies for it’, The Political Query, vol. 80, No. 3, Pg. 341, Available at Leeds trinity university library https://lib.leedstrinity.ac.uk, (Accessed 2 November 2017) Scunthorpe, T (2017), ‘Government will hire an extra 8,000 staff and spend £662 million preparing for a no deal Brexit, David Davis reveals after briefing the Cabinet’ Daily Mail, Available at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5033799/David-Davis-reveal-No-Deal-Brexit-work.html, (accessed 2 November 2017) Cabinet office, (2016)’Ministerial Code’, gov.uk, Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ministerial-code (accessed 2 November 2017) Tieran, A, (2006) ‘OVERBLOWN OR OVERLOAD? MINISTERIAL STAFF AND DILEMMAS OF EXECUTIVE ADVICE’, social alternatives, vol. 25, No. 3, Third quarter Pg. 7, Available at Leeds trinity university library https://lib.leedstrinity.ac.uk (accessed 2 November 2017 Role of Ministers in the UK Political System

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