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Case Zhou Bicycle Company

Case Zhou Bicycle Company.

Hi, HelperI need you to understand how to write an Email Case, there will be a Case you need to read and analyze, and then watch the youtube video link, which also includes in the Case 4 document . Finally , based on reading and video analysis, there have three questions you need solved and answer in the case. Around 300 words is enough. If you have any question, please let me know.Email Case questions1. Highlight an operational challenge (or opportunity) at the company2. Recommend a strategic “next step” based on your assessment3. Suggest a line of questioning / topic area to explore with the consultant team during their presentationBy the way, Could u can help me do the second question of document, A Basic Inventory Management Model (In Excel). I don’t how to do EOQ,ROP,SS
Case Zhou Bicycle Company

Shakespeare’s tragic heroes are often represented as noble characters who suffer disaster and who are not to blame because of their naivety. At the same time, the brilliance of the tragedy is confined to the flaws of the characters which prevents them from making the right decision. Othello is also in front of the choice whether to trust his wife or listen to his ill-famed tempter. Othello, therefore, is a tragic hero who confronts the strong force of his jealousy and excess trustfulness. The rapid development of the actions in Shakespeare’s play reveals Othello’s gradual fall from grace as a result of his growing jealousy. At the end of the play, Othello’s realizes that his naivety and lack of confidences in his wife’ innocence and fidelity. The hero attempts to receive one more change to redeem and suffers because of the inevitability of the outcomes of his personal weaknesses. Othello is a tragic hero whose nobleness and naivety prevents him from making the right decisions. The protagonist, therefore, is a soldierly character who belongs to a primitive race and is guided by emotions rather than by his mind. Although his has a jealous and passionate nature, Othello rejects his impulsivity: “… Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will rust them. – Good signior, you shall more command with years than with your weapons” (Shakespeare 20). By pronouncing these phrases, one can call Othello as a wise personality whose nobleness and grace makes him reasonable and impassionate. At a glance, Othello meet al the requirements of a noble figure. He takes the noble position of the General of the Republic of Venice and he is always aware of the responsibilities he takes. Despite these words, the hero is soon eager to take revenge on his wife for reasons that would have never been counted as a proof by a reasonable and sensible mind. Placing faith in Iago, whom he considers to be committed to the highest moral values, Othello makes an error brining him to fall. The wrong decisions made of Othello are due to the flaws in his character. The hero suffers tremendously because of his ill-famed nature and impossibility to resist his primitive impulses. The downfall of Othello lies in his extreme disposition to jealousy and excess confidence in Iago’s honesty. He overtly accepts Iago’s false statements as the truth leading to disaster of the self. Being extremely disposed to deception, he is furious about the facts he learn from Iago and acts immediately, with no delay and little reflection. Othelo’s simple way of thinking, as well as his extreme hatred to wife differs completely from the noble and wise statements at the end of the play: “She’s gone; I am abus’d, and my relief must be to loathe her. O curse of marriage, that we can call these delicate creatures ours and not their appetites.” (Shakespeare 112). Being under the influence of the Ancient, the protagonist fails to believe in his wife’s words and, because of the wrong choice, he commits the inevitable. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More Regarding Othello’s actions described in the play, the hero’s mind, as represented by the poet, is very primitive and simple. He rarely delves into deep reflections concerning his deeds and actions. Therefore, when emotions ignite his imagination, it confuses his intellect. Despite his dignity and faith in honesty and honor, he has absolute trust where there is no place for hesitation. Similarly, other feelings he experiences are also absolute. If he loves, it should be all absorbing, just like other emotions, such as jealousy, passion, and respect. Because of his primitive and one-side nature, the hero is absolutely sure that he has the right to take the position of a judge and punish his wife for betrayal. This major fault, therefore, lies in misplacing confidence in his companion Iago who is extremely villainous. Because of the simple nature, Othello is incapable of conceiving the intrigue around him. As a result, the hero is overwhelmed with emotion s and hatred and neglects the values and honors in which he previously believed. In this respect, the play provides an picture of Othello’s suffering and the shifts occurred to the perception of the surrounding world: “…let her rot, and perish, and be damned to-night; for she shall not live: no, my heart is turned to stone; I strike it, and it hurts my hand” (Shakespeare 157). Any signs of reason and wisdom disappear as soon as Othello is obsessed with taking revenge on Desdemona’s betrayal. Accepting the seen for the truth, Othello puts all doubts aside and suffocates his wife. Being completely fired with the jealousy and passion, Othello later realizes that the murder he committed is not justified. At the end of the play, he realizes that his strong dependence on Iago’s false honesty and authority prevented him from making personal judgment and decisions. Realizing that all moral values her believes in were lost and, therefore, Othello is sure that death is the punishment he deserves for his villainous actions: “…you must speak of one that loved not wisely, but too well, of one not easily jealous, but being wrought….one whose hand…threw a pearl away rich than all his tribe…” (Shakespeare 234). Learning the truth, Othello once again reveals his primitive and noble character. His sincerity and naivety ruins him and distracts him from the noble path, which is the main tragedy of the play. On the one hand, Othello’s absolute trust in fidelity, honesty, and love makes him a gracious character. However, failure to listen to his own mind prevents him from doing the right decisions in his life. On the other hand, Iago is a strong villainous force that takes advantage of the hero’s naïve and primitive nature to generate chaos and dishonesty. We will write a custom Essay on Othello’s Fall from Grace and Redemption at the End of the Play specifically for you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More In conclusion, it should be stressed that Othello is a classical tragic hero who fails to resist his primitive and jealous nature. He fails to trust to the self and is trapped within the Iago’s intrigues. Being disposed to the Ancient’s influence, the hero fails to discover the truth and relieve his mind from hatred and fury. As a result, his falls from grace and his utmost feeling of honesty. With no reflection and judgment, Othello commits murder because he believes that his acts are those of a noble man. Desdemona, therefore, must die in not to betray other man. At the end of the novel Othello realizes that his hasty actions are not justified. Guided by a splash of emotions, the hero neglects other opinions and puts his fate in the hands of his ill-famed companion. Overall, Shakespeare’s play provides an insight in the tragic events leading to redemption and reconciliation. At the same time, the story is a bright example of events that teach people be more reliant on personal opinion. Works Cited Shakespeare, William. Othello. US: Plain Label Books, 1968. Print.

ENGL 1050 Purdue University Lori Laughlin College Admissions Scandal Essay

ENGL 1050 Purdue University Lori Laughlin College Admissions Scandal Essay.

I’m working on a writing project and need guidance to help me study.

This project asks you to trace a specific event that contains a real-world equity-based problem and to use writing in a way that allows you to grapple with the complexity of this problem.First, identify a real-world event in which equity is a concernSecond, you will sift through information, research and explore how this equity event was covered in social media and on the news, that is, what was written about this event.You will consider the accessibility, credibility, and stability of the messages, information, and knowledge that spiral out from an event in the hours, days, weeks, months, years, and perhaps decades following that event.Third, you will compose an exploratory essay to trace this event and the information that cycles in, around, and through it. You will use your writing to attempt to arrive at knowledge about the equity-based concern and the event that encapsulates it.You will try to capture the movement of the event and the information about the event in your essay. You will also try to craft your writing so that your essay follows the timing of the event and the equity-based concern it involves. You will NOT be taking a position on this event. In this exploratory essay, you should simply explore the equity event. You should be concerned with the who, what, where, when, why and how of the event you picked.you’ll be working on this project in a process over 3 steps. In the first step of the project cycle, you’ll pick an equity event in our discussion, and you’ll think about your own definition of equity. Next, you’ll work on researching your selected equity event.The second step of the project cycle, you’ll compose a short rough draft. Then you’ll do peer review on that short rough draft and then you’ll work on revising and expanding that short rough draft into a longer rough draft for the Eli Review cycle in the third week of the project cycle.Structuring Your EssayA possible essay structure you could use would be:-introduce the equity event (tell readers when and where it occurred)- explore how the events unfolded-go through a list of the facts of what happened-discuss who was involved in the event-explore several (3-4) pieces of researched writing on this event (social media posts, news coverage, etc.-examine how the event ended, if it’s still being covered/talked about today in the news or on social mediaFormatting RequirementsYour exploratory essay should be a minimum of 4 full pages (double spaced) and should be in APA format (title page, in-text citations, references page): https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/general_format.htmlSources on the references page should be cited according to APA standards: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/reference_list_basic_rules.htmlThe final essay should be set in 12-point Times New Roman font on 1-inch margins. Please use Word or if you use Google Docs, download and save as a Word file.This project will be graded on how well the:Essay explores a range of found messages (social media or news coverage)—each with its own unique degree of accessibility, credibility, and stability—focused on a single equity event Essay employs an organizational pattern that effectively captures movementEssay evaluates found messages (social media or news coverage) to discover knowledgeWriting stylistically establishes the writer’s metaphorical voiceIntroduction balances competing purposes of opening paragraphsSentences match topical subjects and grammatical subjectsSentences use verb tense to follow time consistently (Chapter 11)RubricAPA format used properly: title page, in-text citations, references pageUse of a variety of researched sources: social media posts, news coverage, journal articles, newspaper articles, etc.Specificity of Essay Topic: writes on a specific equity eventContent: explores equity event without giving an opinion or arguing a position Writing: Writing is clear and fluidMechanics: Spelling and grammar used properlyLength: paper meets requirement of 4 double-spaced pagesAudienceThe audience for this piece of writing is your classmates, many of whom have not had the opportunity to explore the equity-based issue upon which you have focused.Project Note:In thinking about a topic for this Equity Event Essay, it is important that you first read the textbook chapter that goes along with this assignment. Then you want to think about themes that help you reflect on possible real-world equity-based problems. You must pick a specific event to trace for project 3, the Equity Event Exploratory Essay.Below is a list of some general equity themes and some possible specific equity events you could use for your topic for project 3.Whatever theme you pick, you’d need to find a very specific real life example event to use and trace for this assignment.So, for example, if you wanted to look at equity in higher education, you would need to search for an article on a real-life event that involved a person who didn’t get fair access to higher education. Equity in access to higher education (low income, lack of education, cost, etc.)Equity in genders (men making more money than women)Equity in GLBTQ rights (lack of access to health care, job discrimination, etc.)Equity in adoption cases/surrogacy cases (rights of mothers)Equity in police brutality (Trayvon Martin, George Floyd)Equity in standardized testing (students who are smart but don’t test well)Equity in access with online learning (low income families, access to internet and computers)Equity in children vs. adults (human trafficking, child pornography)Equity in voting (mail in voting, discrimination in voting, access to voting)Equity in grandparent rights (ability to see children without parent approval)Equity of school dress codes (should students have dress codes or uniforms)Some specific events (topics you could use for project 3):Flint water crisisRosa Parks (bus incident)Larry Nassar Gymnastics caseTitle IX law of 1972Women’s suffrage movement 1920George FloydBreonna TaylorLori Laughlin college admissions scandal
ENGL 1050 Purdue University Lori Laughlin College Admissions Scandal Essay

William Blakes Collections Of Poetry English Literature Essay

custom writing service “Infant Joy” and “Infant Sorrow” are parts William Blake’s collections of poetry, the former in “Songs of Innocence” while the latter in “Songs of Experience”. As Blake often did with his poems, the images he created for these poem help the reader better understand the meaning of these poems and better convey any emotion the reader could feel from reading them. One of the most noticeable things about the titles of the poems and the collections in which they are contained is that they prepare the reader for the tone of the poems. “Infant Joy” and “Infant Sorrow” have been constructed by Blake to show two points of view for a single event. The first describes the innocence and joy of childbirth. The latter a more realistic view from the parents. “Infant Joy” and “Infant Sorrow” both use two stanzas. “Infant Joy” uses the rhyme scheme ABCDAC for the first stanza, and ABCDDC for the second. “Infant Sorrow” uses AABB as the rhyme scheme for both stanzas. These poems can clearly be seen as Romantic due to the subject of childbirth being one of the most important parts of Nature. It was a subject that crossed all social lines and at many times was the initial cause of rifts in partnerships, such as arranged marriages meant to solidify an agreement between two families which may have had high social standing. The infant mortality rate was so high that many people did not bother to name their children until it was apparent that the child would live into adolescence. It can also be said that these poems deal with the Individual as well, being that childbirth is indeed a very personal experience. The two poems also share the baby as the focal point, and it seems that the baby is the narrator in “Infant Sorrow”, although it could be thought that the narrator is actually the grown up version of the baby recollecting the event of birth. “Infant Joy” has a theme of unrealized potential and gives the reader a look into the happiness that comes over the parents during this occasion. “Infant Sorrow”, on the other hand, holds a darker connotation, in which the parents know that any hopes they have for a happy life for their child is wishful thinking at best. The theme of unrealized potential in “Infant Joy” is first presented by the dialogue in the poem, in which the child is simply called Joy. The significance of this is that parents can be thought to be basking in their newfound happiness and joy and for a brief moment they think of the possibilities that face their child. It should be noted that the parents are not actually mentioned in the poem, but it could be suggested that the mother is talking to her newborn child. As Robert Essick points out, Joy is emphasized with the description of the child’s smiling face (110-111). In “Infant Joy” the mother seems to sing to the child, a song of innocence, in “Infant Sorrow” the mother and the father express anguish and sadness, a song of experience. Some might argue that groaning and weeping are not songs, but John Grant argues that it could equally be argued that these are songs of realism, songs of pain, songs of experience (54). There is a very evident sense of hope in “Infant Joy”, with many simple adjectives which describe the scene. In contrast, “Infant Sorrow” generates a sense of quiet despair with the way it uses emotion. The illustrations Blake created for each of the poems reflect these thoughts. The illustration for “Infant Joy” has been painted in bright, vibrant colors with the simple flowing shapes of flowers as a background. The flower represents the mother’s womb, protecting the child. The presence of the angel is an allusion to the biblical Annunciation. Stuart Peterfreund has interpreted this religious overtone, in conjunction with the repeated use of “I am” in the poem, as an allusion to Exodus 3:14 where God says “I am that I am” (109). Blake could be implying that the infant is divine and therefore divinity is “joy”. In “Infant Sorrow”, the parents can be thought to have come back to reality and now understand that despite their best wishes, their child has a very bleak future and any hopes or dreams they have for their child are meaningless. The child is described as being “helpless”, signifying the feelings that have now replaced the happiness they felt earlier. They have no illusions of greatness for their child, and could possibly even feel pity for the child since it has no idea what awaits it. The accompanying image for “Infant Sorrow” depicts the mother tending to her child, but her face does not convey a sense of happiness. The poem focuses on the horror of the world, and the physical act of the infant’s birth. Unlike “Infant Joy”, “Infant Sorrow” does mention the child’s father, albeit in a minor role, “My mother groan’d! my father wept/Struggling in my father’s hands” (1,5). The language used in “Infant Sorrow” stands in stark contrast with that found in “Infant Joy”. The frequent repetition and monosyllabic words create a very childlike and innocent atmosphere: Pretty joy! Sweet joy, but two days old. Sweet Joy I call thee: (7-9) The use of assonance gives the poem a song-like quality. The rhyming couplet with “smile” towards the end of the poem also aids this presentation, and reinforces the pleasant atmosphere with simple joy and happiness. In “Infant Sorrow”, however, Blake makes more use of rhyming couplets but in this case, they create a more sinister tone in the poem. Another contrast between “infant Joy” and “Infant Sorrow” is the image which accompanies “Infant Sorrow”. John Bender and Anne Mellor describe how the image bears almost no resemblance to “Infant Joy”, save the hair color of the character’s hair. The smiling face of the mother is replaced with that of a mother who realizes the hardship that awaits her child. Blake has removed the safe womb-like structure of the flower and replaces it with an ordinary room with no overlooking angel (297-319). One of the things that make Blake’s poems so effective was that he often created his poems in pairs, with both poems coming from different points of view. There is no doubt that many may have seen his poems as subversive, as is evident with his poems which focus on God and the Creation, but Blake always did his best to make the reader view a single subject from an aspect which the reader might have never considered otherwise. Blake uses this device extremely well with “Infant Joy” and “Infant Sorrow”. It almost seems like Blake sets up the reader for disappointment with the initial happiness of “Infant Joy”, creating an emotional wave that mirrors the transition that takes place between the two poems. Using this writing style, Blake certainly created some of the most thought provoking writings during his period. Bender, John, and Anne Mellor. Liberating the Sister Arts: The Revolution of Blake’s “Infant Sorrow”. Baltimore: John Hopkins U, 1983. 297-319. Print. Essick, Robert. William Blake in a Newtonian World: Essays on Literature as Art and Science. Oxford: Oxford U, 1989. Print. Grant, John. Blake’s Poetry and Designs. London: W.W.Norton, 1979. Print. Peterfreund, Stuart. William Blake in a Newtonian World: Essays on Literature as Art and Science. Norman: U of O P, 1998. Print.

Five Questions, political science homework help

Five Questions, political science homework help.

I have provided the chapters. The are five questions all answers must come from the text and use in-text citation please put page number all in APA style. Check grammar. You must use the text. Please have access to the chapters I have provided. Each question should be three to four sentences long with in-text citation and page number. Please place the answers under the questions. How does federalism affect policy development? How then does policy development affect the rights of the individual? What is the overall effect? Why should we be concerned? Provide at least two examples to support your argument. Discuss the impact of political processes on policy content in context of the preceding statements.Reference Dye, T.R. (2010). Understanding public policy (13th ed.). Longman: Pearson Prentice Hall. ISBN: 9780205757428. Custom ISBN: 9781256054160https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781256053354/id/ch03https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781256053354/id/ch04https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781256053354/id/ch05
Five Questions, political science homework help

History History History History History History History History History

History History History History History History History History History. I don’t understand this History question and need help to study.

History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History History
History History History History History History History History History