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Capella University Transaction Processing Model Database IP2 Essay

Capella University Transaction Processing Model Database IP2 Essay.

Write 1000 words.Please first study the relevant content in the course materials, and investigate the library and Internet for the definitions of ACID properties, the CAP Theorem, and mobile database, as well as the problems of a mobile database. Then based on the results of your research, present a high level design of a transaction processing model for the mobile database by applying the CAP Theorem. You can make any specific assumption on the characteristics of the application that the mobile database needs to support to narrow the scope of the design. You need to include the following in the design:Use 1 example to describe at least 1 problem with any one of the ACID properties that cannot be ensured for your transactionUse 1 example to describe the specific trade-off among CAP properties in your proposed transaction processing modelDescribe the rationale behind the trade-off and the pros and cons of your proposed transaction processing modelPlease list at least 5 references (textbooks can be used as references too).
Capella University Transaction Processing Model Database IP2 Essay

Computer Science homework help. “Gift of the Magi” Choose the best multiple-choice answers for the following questions about the short story “Gift of the Magi.”7. What is ironic about “The Gift of the Magi”?Della thinks she looks like a Coney Island chorus girl with her short hair.Della and Jim sacrifice greatly in order to buy gifts that can’t be used.Della goes to get her hair cut and receives as much as Jim earns in a week.Jim’s paycheck has been reduced to twenty dollars a week, rather than thirty dollars a week.8. Which of the following pieces of advice would be a good theme statement for “The Gift of the Magi”?Treasure the love you receive above all. It will survive long after your gold and good health have vanished. ? Og MandinoDon’t be afraid to take big steps. You can’t cross a chasm in two small jumps. ? David Lloyd GeorgeDon’t carry a grudge. While you’re carrying the grudge the other’s guy’s out dancing. ? Buddy HackettAlways be a little kinder than necessary. ? James M. Barrie9. According to O. Henry, who are the wisest gift givers?Those who are willing to sacrifice for a loved one.Those who find out what a loved one wants before shopping.Those who secretly give gifts to the ones they love.Those who budget and spend their money cautiously.10. Which of the following would O. Henry say is the most valuable possession?learninglovebeautywealth11. What does O. Henry mean when he says that people like Jim and Della “are the magi”?They dress up like the magi in Christmas pageants.They find joy in traveling ? searching for their dreams.They are wise because their lives are guided by love.They have read a lot about the magi and the East. “Through the Tunnel” Choose the best multiple-choice answers for the following questions about the short story “Through the Tunnel.”12. In “Through the Tunnel,” how does Jerry change throughout the course of the story?He is full of self-doubt until he teaches himself to swim and gains confidence in his abilities.He matures from a frustrated little boy to a confident young man.He begins his vacation believing in himself and leaves frustrated because of his weaknesses.He is shy when he first meets the older boys; later, he is bold when he encounters them again.13. What is a valid theme statement for “Through the Tunnel”?There comes a time in a young person’s life when he/she wishes to enter the adult world.It’s important for young people to take time to get away from their busy routines and just relax.Everyone should take time to study and enjoy the beauties of nature.Without parental supervision, a young person can get into a lot of trouble.14. Which point of view is used in “Through the Tunnel”?first personthird person objectivethird person limitedthird person omniscient15. Which of the following is not a conflict Jerry faces in “Through the Tunnel”?The internal conflict of wanting to assert independence.The internal conflict of overcoming fear of the unknown.The external conflict of underwater dangers.The external conflict of extreme peer pressure. “Raymond’s Run” Choose the best multiple-choice answers for the following questions about the short story “Raymond’s Run.”16. Why does Toni Cade Bambara call her story “Raymond’s Run”?The story centers around how people in Hazel’s town try to run Raymond’s life.In the story, Raymond is able to enter the twenty-yard dash in the May Day races and almost wins.Hazel’s sudden insight that Raymond is a good runner is a highlight of the story.The title is symbolic because Raymond runs his sister’s life by taking up all her free time.17. In which of the following situations would Hazel feel most comfortable?entering her smile in a photo contestdancing around a May pole in a white dresshugging her brother Raymond in publicplaying the part of a wolf in a school18. Which of the following statements is the best theme of the story?Exercise your imagination frequently.Avoid conflict with others at all costs.Don’t be overly confident in yourself.Be honest and worthy of respect.19. Which of the following is something that bothers Hazel?showing offfakenessbraggingfist fights20. From what we can gather, how does Raymond feel about his sister?He is frustrated by her constant attentiveness.He admires her and wants to be like her.He feels that she neglects and avoids him.He is indifferent towards her.21. How does Hazel show her love for her brother Raymond in the story?constantly watching out for his well-beingtelling him “I love you” every daycoaching him every day in his runningentering him in the May Day races22. Which two words best describe Hazel Parker (Squeaky)?neglectful and idletimid and patientnonjudgemental and shygenuine and confident23. Why is Hazel jumping up and down after the race?She can’t wait to get another ribbon to add to her collection.She is extremely excited that she beat Gretchen P. Lewis.She realizes that with practice she could enter the Olympics.She is excited to see Raymond and can’t wait to coach him. “Magic and the Night River” Choose the best multiple-choice answers for the following questions about the short story “Magic and the Night River.”24. What is the significance of the title “Magic and the Night River”?Yoshi and his grandfather entertain tourists with magic tricks.Kano’s cormorants magically come back to him after being let free.The fishermen are able to light lamps on the water as if by magic.Yoshi’s grandfather’s cormorants are “tied” to him as if by magic.25. What does Yoshi see as “another kind of magic” in the last paragraph?He grows stronger while his grandfather grows weaker.Kano is going to let them continue to rent the boat.His grandfather will be able to train eight new birds.His grandfather knows each bird by name.26. By the end of the story, how does Kano feel about Yoshi’s grandfather?He is disappointed that he didn’t catch more fish.He wants to take fishing lessons from him.He decides that he is too old to fish on his boat.He has gained respect for this gentle fisherman.27. What are Yoshi’s feelings about his grandfather?He thinks he is the greatest master fisherman.He wishes he would stand up to Kano.He is sad that they don’t communicate very well.He wishes he were younger and quicker.28. What does Yoshi think will happen in the future?He and his grandfather will set up a tourist attraction.He and his grandfather will continue fishing with many birds.He and his grandfather will buy all Kano’s boats.He and his grandfather will look for another boat to rent.29. What happens out on the water that amazes Yoshi and his grandfather the most?Kano lets his birds fly away.Yoshi is able to untangle the cords.They catch more fish than Kano.The freed birds come back to their boat.30. What unexpected conflict arises out on the water?Yoshi’s grandfather loses all his cormorants.Yoshi almost drowns after losing his balance and falling in the water.Yoshi’s and his grandfather’s cords get tangled with another boat’s.Kano begins yelling across the water at Yoshi’s grandfather.31. Matching. Match the following terms with their appropriate meanings. Look for familiar word parts to decode the meanings of each word.1.against name (or a word of opposite meaning)2.a false name3.the outer layer of skin4.of or relating to a father5.love or enthusiasm for something that is newa.neophiliab.paternalc.pseudonymd.epidermise.antonym Short Story Elements. Multiple choice. Choose the correct response in the following questions and statements about short story elements. 32. The process of bringing a character to life in a story is calledcharacter dialoguecharacter analysischaracterizationcharacter motive33. Which point of view is being used if the narrator (outside the story) relates the thoughts and feelings of only one character in a story?third person limitedthird person objectivefirst personthird person omniscient34. The setting in a story is the time and place of the story’s action.truefalse35. What are the two main types of conflict a main character might encounter in a story?rising and fallingexposition and resolutionnatural and unnaturalinternal and external36. Which of the following statements about theme is false?Theme is the basic message an author is trying to portray in a story.We usually have to infer the author’s central idea from the story.There can be more than one theme in a piece of literature.The author usually tells us the theme at the end of the story.Computer Science homework help

Romania Economic Analysis

Romania is a complex country with mainly influential geographic features. The country does use its own language, Romanian, but also often uses other tongues. Romania and its people are affected by the geographic features and also the political and economic choices and laws made by their type of government and population. Geographic: Romania is located in Europe. It is bordered by the following countries, Hungary, Serbia, Bulgaria, Moldova and Ukraine. Romania has many valuable resources that allow them to be a successful country. Resources that play a role in this include, coal, iron, copper, and clay. This provides valuable power sources, and trading opportunities. Romania uses hydropower, which is an effective, clean, renewable and sustainable energy source. They are able to use this form of energy due to their given geography. Hydropower requires 15 per/mile winds, and a large mountainous area. Romania has both of these; their main mountain range is the Transylvanian Alps and the Southern Carpathians. These mountain rages go directly through half of Romania. Romania is landlocked as well as Hungary, these countries are surrounded by the Carpathian, Alps, and Dinaric mountains. Romania also has arable land, that provides farming and green lands for grazing and other positive economic affects. The countries infrastructure is fairly expensive and Romania includes, 103,671 km of road for transport and other everyday uses, 11,385 km of railroads also for transport and other exports, as well as 3.84 million miles of telephone lines in order to satisfy the constant growing technology use of the country. Also going through the country is many rivers. A main river that also cuts through about half of the country is the Danube River which includes canals; which is valuable for transport across long stretches of land. This river opens up to the black sea, which results in Romania not being landlocked. The river connects with this body of water at the Mouth of the Danube, which is located at the south-east part of the country. Political: Romania has many different ethnicities. Their country is home to 6.1% Hungarian, 83.4% Romanian, 3.1% Roma, .2% German, .7% Other, and 6.19% Un-specified. This Jurassic difference in culture is most likely due to the mountain range that splits the country straight down the middle. This results in almost completely different cultures on either side of the mountain. There is a social change between the rich and the poor because the change has been slow and less-centrally controlled economic sporadic in nature. Romania is a parliamentary republic which means that the leader of the country’s the Prime Minister who is appointed by the president and is responsible to the parliament of Romania. The center of the parliament is in Victoria palace Bucharest. This form of government has its flaws on the country such as high levels of corruption, recently in Romania many protests are occurring due to the corruption; which is bribery to the government to get things done by businesses or more wealthy people. This causes the political systems to be weaker because of unfair laws and a bias government. As of the population of 18 million, 50% of women and over 25% of men are unable to read or write; they are illiterate. This makes the country less developed and unreadily for change to move forward in the economy and in the government. Economic: Romania has many rivers but they aren’t all necessarily navigable. The largest river and the most navigable is the Danube which is 1,777 miles. This river also cuts through half of the country much like the mountain range. This river is good for trading due to the fact that water is the cheapest and goes through most of the country. This is mainly the only navigable river that is efficient. Transportation is definitely a barrier for trade due to the fact that mountains and rivers block half of the country from the others, which also effects being able to go to access the bordering countries. Though the market for the goods is not the best there has been an increase in goods in recent years. The population as said before is about 75% illiterate this results in mass illiteracy and rural education of the population. Most of the population is living in a rural environment we feel that this is also due to the mass separation between the country. For those who are educated often revert to Islam; we feel this is due that they have more access to information and variety of religions. The average population is 19,925,329 million which has often had a decrease of -.25% over the years. Romania’s per capita income is $9491 as of 2013. This means that from all of the money the country makes divided by the population the average income per person is $9491. This income is distributed by individual tax income and is in large differences. This means that many people in the country are making and gaining different amounts. The income has fluctuated between $9949 in 2008 and $1101 in 1992. Other influences or facts about Romania: Romania is in the Mediterranean climate which means that they have mild rain falls all year, and a wetter and cooler climate during the winter seasons. Romania is also closer to the coast which affects its weather patterns. Though it does not directly connect with the ocean the changes the weather has on the ocean the same changes effect Romania. Romania and its features are very complex. Including the almost completely separate cultures due to its mountainous geography. The different languages and origins of the population affect how the government acts and what laws and income will be made by and for the people. Romania has many influences that affects the country in many ways.

Examining views on RyanAirs Strategy and Success

custom writing service Ryanair was founded in 1985 as a family business that originally provided full service conventional scheduled airline services between Ireland and the UK. The airline started to compete within the confines of the existing industry by trying to steal customers from their rivals, especially the state monopoly carrier Air Lingus, outlined by Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne (2004) as “Bloody or Red Ocean Strategy”. Ryanair seemed to follow a “me-too strategy”; according to Osborne, K. (2005), they “tried to be all things to all people”. Even they started restructuring; their strategy was not enough differentiated and their cost advantage was too low to be profitable. Ryanair then created a competitive advantage through the alignment of the three components of business systems; 1)Creating superior value for their customers (outside perspective) 2)Supplying their superior value-adding activities in an effective and efficient manner (which jointly form the “Value Chain”) 3)Possessing over the resource base required to perform the value-adding activities, (inside perspective) According to Porter (1987), “corporate strategy is what makes the corporate whole add up to more than the sum of its business unit parts.” It is seen to be concerned with the overall purpose and scope of the organisation and to meet the expectations of major stakeholders. All aspects of Ryanair’s value chain are important to the company and their shareholders as Ryanair’s decisions add value to both. The following report outlines the three perspectives of shaping Ryanair’s business system. The value creation dimension of Ryanair’s business model will be outlined, considering the theories of Porter and the more recent authors Kim and Mauborgne (2004). Further, the linkages in the airline’s value chain and their resource base will be analysed, considering Hamel and Prahalad’s (1990) core competency model (inside-out approach). In section 2, the future challenges of the airline are considered. Ryanair’s strengths and weaknesses will be analysed, internal value creating factors such as assets, skills or resources, to consider how the airline can create alignment to its opportunities and threats, external factors. An stronger “outside – in” approach for Ryanair’s future corporate strategy will be considered, applying Porter’s five forces model, placing the market, the competition, and the customer at the starting point of the strategy process. Excerpt (computer-generated) Page 2 Global Corporate Strategy A Case Study on Ryan Air 1 An Analysis of Ryanair’s Corporate Strategy Executive Summary Ryanair was founded in 1985 as a family business that originally provided full service conventional scheduled airline services between Ireland and the UK. The airline started to compete within the confines of the existing industry by trying to steal customers from their rivals, especially the state monopoly carrier Air Lingus, outlined by Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne (2004) as “Bloody or Red Ocean Strategy”. Ryanair seemed to follow a “me-too strategy”; according to Osborne, K. (2005), they “tried to be all things to all people”. Even they started restructuring; their strategy was not enough differentiated and their cost advantage was too low to be profitable. In 1986, they got “stuck in the middle”, outlined by Porter (1985) as they had a limited cost advantage and no service advantage. Ryanair then created a competitive advantage through the alignment of the three components of business systems; 1) Creating superior value for their customers (outside perspective) 2) Supplying their superior value-adding activities in an effective and efficient manner (which jointly form the “Value Chain”) 3) Possessing over the resource base required to perform the value-adding activities, (inside perspective) According to Porter (1987), “corporate strategy is what makes the corporate whole add up to more than the sum of its business unit parts.” It is seen to be concerned with the overall purpose and scope of the organisation and to meet the expectations of major stakeholders. All aspects of Ryanair’s value chain are important to the company and their shareholders as Ryanair’s decisions add value to both. The following report outlines the three perspectives of shaping Ryanair’s business system. The value creation dimension of Ryanair’s business model will be outlined, considering the theories of Porter and the more recent authors Kim and Mauborgne (2004). Further, the linkages in the airline’s value chain and their resource base will be analysed, considering Hamel and Prahalad’s (1990) core competency model (inside-out approach). Page 3 Global Corporate Strategy A Case Study on Ryan Air 2 In section 2, the future challenges of the airline are considered. Ryanair’s strengths and weaknesses will be analysed, internal value creating factors such as assets, skills or resources, to consider how the airline can create alignment to its opportunities and threats, external factors. An stronger “outside in” approach for Ryanair’s future corporate strategy will be considered, applying Porter’s five forces model, placing the market, the competition, and the customer at the starting point of the strategy process. I An evaluation of Ryanair’s key strategic perspectives 1) Creating superior value for their customers The low cost market segment Ryanair has found a source of leveraging a competitive advantage; the knowledge about the opportunities associated with implementing the low cost strategy, which was created by Southwest Airlines. The Texas airline found a unique approach to the market through re- conceptualisation of market segments. In 1990, Ryanair successfully applied their model in the European market, becoming a “no frills” airline, focussing on short haul destinations and keeping its planes in the air as frequently as possible in a 24 hour period. The new low price market segment, which did not exist before in Europe, could be described as the development of a `blue ocean’, uncontested market space through the expansion of boundaries of the existing industry, outlined by Kim and Mauborgne (2004). Ryanair’s low fares created demand, particularly from fare-conscious leisure and business travellers who might otherwise have used alternative forms of transportation or would not have travelled at all (Case Study, p. 3). The competition became less relevant and allowed Ryanair to develop and sustain high performance in an overcrowded industry. Up to now the airline benefits from the early profitable and rapid growth within the blue ocean and successfully executes the low cost business model, which became obvious when the airline announced that it has beaten its own downbeat forecasts to record a 29 % increase in pre-tax profits and 19 % passenger growth, having carried more than 27.6 million passengers in the past financial year (Jameson, A., 2005). Page 4 Global Corporate Strategy A Case Study on Ryan Air 3 Ryanair’s position within the industry However, `blue oceans’ are not easily protected and Ryanair has been facing competitors that try to copy their low cost approach. Further, Ryanair has always been competing within the `red ocean’, by targeting a broad range of customers, e.g. the business segment and “stealing customer from rivals”. This outlines that Kim and Mauborgne’s strategy approach cannot be seen as exclusive. Competing with new entrants of competitors (and differentiators), Ryanair was able to launch an “all out war”, lowering prices and remaining profitable whilst increasing the frequency of flights and establishing new routes (Case Study). According to Porter (1980, 1985), the relative competitive position within an industry lies at the core of success or failure of firms. He defined two basics types of competitive advantage; cost leadership and differentiation (and focus). Ryanair set out to be best in the budget market segment, becoming the lowest cost airline in its industry (cost focus), e.g. no paper tickets, no passenger meals, no pre-arranged seating, enabling to cope and remain profitable, even on low yields. The airline constantly strives to reduce or control four of the primary expenses involved in running a major scheduled airline; their aircraft equipment costs, personnel productivity, customer service costs, airport access and handling costs. The airline deals successfully with competitive forces and is Europe’s leader in low fares by generating a superior return on investment (Osborne, 2005). This supports Mintzberg’s argument of price leadership being more relevant to competitive advantage than cost leadership. Planning to turn into a “no-fares-airline” by offering flights for free (Case Study), Ryanair can be argued to follow price leadership as one of the six ways to differentiation outlined by Minzberg. According to Mr O’ Leary (2005), new planes will enable him to drive down average fares by 5% a year causing a “bloodbath”. We are going to show up in your market and trash your yields.” (“Ryanair rolls out plans for European domination”, 2005). Differentiation through price outlines the superseding of Porter’s generic strategies by the resource/competence-based strategy frameworks. In addition to low prices, Ryanair’s branding emphasises on punctuality and efficiency, which is mainly achieved through operating from secondary airports. According to Ryanair, their success is not just due to their low fares “but also a winning combination of our No.1 on-time record, our friendly and efficient people and our new Boeing 737-800 series aircraft” (Ryanair, 2005). It can therefore be argued that in a globalized competitive environment, even cost leaders need to differentiate Page 5 Global Corporate Strategy A Case Study on Ryan Air 4 their message (`hybrid strategy’), contradicting Porter’s original idea of fundamentally different routes to competitive advantage. International expansion Ryanair further constantly created value for customers by following generic growth and internationalisation strategies; they moved their operations into more and more countries, expanding the route system from its primarily Irish-UK emphasis to serve 86 destinations on 133 routes across 16 countries. According to Mr. O’ Leary (2005), they “will deliver 34m passengers from 12 European bases and have identified a further 48 potential bases.” The airline expanded recently by placing an order for 70 more Boeing 737-800 aircraft to keep growing at 20% a year (“Ryanair rolls out plans for European domination”, 2005). Ryanair can compete on price, as the airline has besides its low cost product offering an activity system and resource base that match the price positioning, opposite to traditional airlines that seem to get “stuck in the middle”, as outlined by Porter, when undergoing severe cost cutting which affects their areas of differentiation, e.g. Aer Lingus. 2) Supplying superior value-adding activities in an effective and efficient manner The “Value Chain” As Ryanair’s low cost/price approach leads to overlapping value chains, the company is a perfect example of linking its opportunities, as outlined by Campbell and Goold (1998, in Meyer and de Witt, 2004). From a Value Based Management point of view, Porter’s Value Chain framework can be seen as one of two dimensions in maximizing corporate value creation, outlining how well a company performs relatively towards its competitors (`Relative Competitive Position’). Even Ryanair subscribes to a similar basic model compared to e.g. Easyjet, the airline has an entirely different value chain. Ryanair’s low cost/price approach adds value to most of Ryanair’s processes, e.g. clear corporate identity and brand image in addition to limited organisational complexity, increasing the differentiation towards their competitors. Ryanair maintains their efficient, high quality and low cost services through operating from secondary airports and by exploiting the advantages of outsourcing, a strategic management model, transferring the business processes of services to outside firms, e.g. passenger and aircraft handling, ticketing. This allows the Ryanair boss aims to axe ‘unnecessary’ co-pilots Ryanair chief Michael O’Leary will seek permission from aviation authorities to have just one pilot on shorter flights Press association guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 8 September 2010 10.48 BST Article history ryanair boss Michael O’Leary wants to use just one pilot per flight as part of his ongoing drive to save costs at the budget airline. O’Leary said he intends to write to aviation authorities for permission to use only one pilot per flight because he believes co-pilots are unnecessary in modern jets, the Financial Times reported today. The airline boss, who has previously considered standing tickets on flights, as well as charging for the use of toilets, conceded that two pilots would be needed on long-haul flights, but said on shorter trips that flight attendants could do the job. In an interview he said the second pilot was only there to “make sure the first fella doesn’t fall asleep and knock over one of the computer controls”. He backed up his comments by adding that trains were allowed to have one driver even though this could conceivably cause a crash in the event of a heart attack. He said: “It could save the entire industry a fortune. In 25 years with over about 10 million flights we’ve had one pilot who suffered a heart attack in flight and he landed the plane.” But industry experts have labelled the proposal “unwise”. A spokesman for the British Airline Pilots Association said: “This is just a bid for publicity. His suggestion is unsafe and his passengers would be horrified.” O’Leary frequently courts controversy with his attempts to cut costs at Ryanair. This year he raised the baggage charge for the summer holiday season and, following the volcano ash cloud crisis, initially capped the level of compensation to passengers. He later bowed to EU pressure and agreed to pay out costs to customers affected by the eruption. (Source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2010/sep/08/ryanair-axe-unnecessary-co-pilots ) Broker snap: Ryanair maintains guidance Thu 30 September 2010 12:53 Email this to a friend | Text size: A A A Attention-seeking no-frills airline Ryanair held an investor day on Wednesday which mainly focused on the company’s business model and medium-term strategy, Commerzbank revealed. “Management reiterated its intention to slow down growth until 2013,” Commerzbank analyst Johannes Braun said. “Full-year guidance for 2010/11 is maintained. However, with current trading developing well, guidance risks are clearly skewed to the upside,” Braun suggested. That’s a view that is mirrored by Panmure Gordon. It thinks the company may have been playing its cards close to its chest by maintaining the full year profit guidance for the current year at EUR350 – 375m. “If it had chosen to change its guidance at this point in time, we believe the profit range would have moved up rather than down,” the broker speculated. Ryanair’s management said it would place another aircraft order if the price is right but if an acceptable price can not be found it is prepared to accept two to three years of zero growth from 2013, if necessary, Braun reported. As growth slows down, the company should be in a position to accumulate cash, but that will not lead to a regular dividend payment if the management’s current thinking is maintained; on the other hand, irregular payments like this year’s EUR500m distribution remain a possibility. The company intends to stick pretty much to its current low-cost business model, despite its intention to increase its presence at bigger airports and, in the words of Braun, “focus on its service proposition.” “While we believe slowing growth and the resulting yield optimisation as well as dividend payout potential are positive, it remains to be seen how unit costs performance will develop in a slower growth environment and the shift of focus to its service proposition will play out. While the share’s valuation is relatively demanding, due to ongoing positive traffic and profit momentum we stay with our Add rating,” the broker said. Panmure Gordon is more positive and is sticking with its “buy” recommendation and EUR5 target price. “Our stance remains positive as the outlook remains very attractive in terms of average fare increases, cost control and strong cash generation,” the broker said. Sources : http://www.h-l.co.uk/shares/share-tips-and-research/stockbroker-tips/archive/broker-snap-ryanair-maintains-guidance RYANAIR.COM THE LOW FARES AIRLINE THE COST CRAZY AIRLINE!: RYANAIR.COM THE LOW FARES AIRLINE THE COST CRAZY AIRLINE! PRESENTATION BY: Philip Avumegah Conall Deazley Paola Lanciani Rory McCaughan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY THE INDUSTRY THE MARKET THE STRATEGY THE SUCCESS STORY INDUSTRY TRENDS: INDUSTRY TRENDS Growth rates in excess of economic activity despite: 1. Market maturity 2. Congested Airports 3. Air traffic control systems Global economic expansion Disaggregation of international trade barriers INDUSTRY TRENDS: INDUSTRY TRENDS DEREGULATION – increasing liberalisation of the world airline industry – ‘open skies’ policy within EU since 1997 – competition rules curtailed state subsidies, forcing cost-cutting programmes – development of low-cost, no-frills air services INDUSTRY TRENDS: INDUSTRY TRENDS EUROPEAN MARKET most expansive market in the world during 1990s high levels of competition passenger transport remains main market INDUSTRY TRENDS: INDUSTRY TRENDS UK MARKET – Two main market sectors: 1. Scheduled 2. Non-scheduled – Scheduled passenger services; the most important sector accounting for over 70% of generated revenue – Scheduled airline demand a result of economic activity, consumer confidence and trends in expenditure INDUSTRY TRENDS : INDUSTRY TRENDS Despite high levels of competition, UK was main target of low-cost airlines Market share of the low-cost airlines RYANAIR – 1.1 EASYJET – 0.9 VIRGIN – 0.4 GO – 0.40 BUZZ – 0.1 INDUSTRY TRENDS: INDUSTRY TRENDS Leisure improved standards of living trend towards choice and variety in leisure short vacations – the fastest growing sector of outbound holiday market Business growth in international trade value for money now extends to business travellers too even in recession, demand for domestic and international travel grows DEFINING THE BUSINESS: DEFINING THE BUSINESS THE PRODUCT Point-to-point short haul commuter and leisure flying ‘Ryanair is the best imitation of Southwest Airlines that I have seen’ Herb Kelleher, Southwest founder. DEFINING THE BUSINESS: DEFINING THE BUSINESS CUSTOMERS Initially targeting those who would fly if the price was right Incresingly targeting the expanding business community DEFINING THE BUSINESS: DEFINING THE BUSINESS THE COMPANY An unconventional airline Distinctive personality Charismatic and energetic leadership incorporated throughout company structure Inclusion of employees in company vision through their ownership DEFINING THE BUSINESS: DEFINING THE BUSINESS THE MARKET Creating new markets and growing existing ones Very competitive domestic market Potential for mainland Europe DEFINING THE BUSINESS: DEFINING THE BUSINESS Well placed to take advantage of deregulation and liberalisation Prepared to take on majors head-to-head (Lufthansa in Germany) Aggressive response to market threats and opportunities (Sept 11th) Michael O’Leary ‘The Robin Hood of the skies’ DEFINING THE BUSINESS: DEFINING THE BUSINESS THE TECHNOLOGIES Incorporation of leading cost-reducing technological capabilities establishing the youngest fleet in Europe expansion of online booking new technologies to delight customers and enhance product STRATEGY: STRATEGY Ryanair’s operating costs vs. European airlines STRATEGY: STRATEGY An experience curve Entry deterring barrier to newcomers STRATEGY: STRATEGY ‘What’s your secret?’ – ‘It’s very simple. We’re like Wal-Mart in the US — we pile it high and sell it cheap.’ One simple formula: STRATEGY: STRATEGY Simplicity – the pervading philosophy of low-cost airlines Ryanair’s twin strategic approach: 1. Maintain industry leading low costs 2. Dramatic growth How are these objectives achieved so successfully? STRATEGY: STRATEGY 1. The low-cost position There exist a number of cost reducing policies all aimed at lowering total unit cost — 1. Ticket-less check-in 2. Single-class cabins – Removal of business class allowing for a higher capacity onboard STRATEGY: STRATEGY 3. Direct online bookings – eliminating travel agents commission 4. Fleet commonality – reducing training and maintenance costs 5. Contracting out of services, obtaining competitive fixed rate prices 6. Airport selection and route policy – less congested; quicker turnaround STRATEGY: STRATEGY 2. Dramatic Growth Continued success for low-cost airlines relies on continued cost advantages Growth = increased overheads: beware the dangers of over-expansion Annual cap on growth of 25% STRATEGY: STRATEGY Sustainable product-cost advantage: traditional airlines have established standards difficult to abandon Poor supplier power allowed highly competitive order of aircraft STRATEGY: STRATEGY Very little individual consumer buying power Threat of substitutes – unable to depress profits given Ryanair’s low-cost base Intense rivalry among key players Likely to increase as expansion into Europe continues (region-to-region competition rather than simply point-to-point) SUCCESS: SUCCESS 1990 – losses of £20 million 2001 – net profit of £65 million 11 consecutive years of remarkable growth Europe’s largest low-fares airline 63 Routes, 12 Countries Passenger numbers up 35%; Average fares down 3% SUCCESS: SUCCESS Continues to demonstrate that low costs are the key to success in the airline industry Not only the lowest cost , but the most profitable Greatest stock market value of any airline in Europe SUCCESS: SUCCESS Awards: Best managed airline (2001,2000,1999) Irish Company of the year (2000) Market Development Award (2000) Golden Spider Award (2000) Best Value for Money Airline (1999,1998,1997,1996,1995) … to name just a few SUCCESS: SUCCESS THE FUTURE: Over 10 million passengers carried last year with the aim of 40 million by 2010 New partnership with Boeing – will revolutionise short-haul air travel all over Europe, as in the US with Southwest A winning formula: Low costs, strong balance sheet, and disciplined management CONCLUSION: CONCLUSION THE COST CRAZY STRATEGY WORKS Authorstreams.com

Racial Slavery in America Term Paper

The study of the history of the development of America reveals the issue of race as being central in the economic, social and political development of the nation. The phenomenon of racial slavery in America emerged with the demands in the Southern states concerning the economic viability of controlled and bound labor. The existence of norms and values that restricted the free citizens from exploiting each other initiated the emergence of racial exploitation. The discovery of the New World by Christopher Columbus provided a new source of labor upon which America’s prosperity would thrive. An analysis of the social and economic structure of the colony of Virginia illustrates that the distortion of the indentured servant system in the colony made the concept of racial slavery considerably attractive. The separation of indenture servants and English landowners marked the onset of racial slavery with Massachusetts becoming the first colony to legalize slavery in 1641 (Dattel, 2009). In Virginia, laws on slavery stated that the child of a slave was automatically subject to enslavement, which made slavery a generational phenomenon. The story of the seizure of Anthony Johnson’s land following a declaration by a jury in Virginia that the government could reposes Johnsons’ land because he was a negro promoted the acceptance of racial exploitation directed towards Negros, mulattos and Indians. IN 1672, the king of England embarked on a venture to feed the increasing demand for slaves and charted the Royal African Company, which was at the center of British slave trade. The 1698 declaration by the England Parliament that any Briton was at liberty to trade in slaves marked the onset of a period of 50 years during which millions of Africans in slave ships reached the coasts of North and South America. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More As the European empire expanded, the colonization of America brought with it vast tracts of land that required intensive labor. The arrival of a Dutch ship loaded with slaves from Africa provided a solution to the problem of working on the harsh conditions that had proved unfavorable for the natives. The fluctuation of tobacco prices eased the demand for slaves, which later increased with the invention of the cotton gin and the replacement of tobacco with cotton as the main cash crop. The expansion of plantations in America in the 18th century demanded an increase in the supply of laborers causing a peak in the transatlantic slave trade. The demand for laborers in the South increased with the invention of the cotton gin, which increased the cultivation cotton on a large scale due to the enhanced processing capability. In this regard, the South became a major hub for the slave trade and cotton-growing regions experienced an explosion of the slave population. The impact of slavery is evident in the transformation and equalization of economies in both low country and upcountry because it had become easier to process both the long staple and short staple cotton grown in the two regions respectively. However, political inequality persisted as evident by the fact that the electoral value of the salves in the upcountry was only three-fifths of a vote. Slavery played a key role in the Westward expansion because the land seized from the Indians provided new settlements in which cultivation of tobacco and cotton blossomed. The territorial expansion of U.S involved the movement of American settlers with their slavers into news territories as evident by the case of Texas. The ban on slavery in Texas by the Mexican government, aimed at taming the influence of Americans, faced considerable opposition by slave owners who forced freed slaves into signing life indenture contracts. We will write a custom Term Paper on Racial Slavery in America specifically for you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Tension between the Mexican government and American settlers caused an outbreak of a rebellion, which eventually led to the annexation of Texas and the concession of New Mexico and California. The onset of the demise of slavery began with the establishment of an anti-slavery movement spearheaded by William Wilberforce and the Quakers. The growing unease regarding the slave trade even among key participants such as Europe saw Denmark take a leading step in abolishing slave trade in 1792 (Horton

CIVL 6618 UNH Atrazine Removal by Sono Electrochemical UV Techniques Discussion

CIVL 6618 UNH Atrazine Removal by Sono Electrochemical UV Techniques Discussion.

MODULE 6 Project Assignment: Evaluation of Treatment Technologies and Alternatives (individual
submission)
Depending on the type of contaminant (Atrazine) that you have chosen, and the potential contamination scenarios
associated with that compound, you may do one of the following for this task (please make sure to consult
with your team members regarding this decision):
1) Pick a contamination scenario (i.e. a contaminated matrix, such as e.g. soil or groundwater) and
describe potential treatment technologies or alternatives for this scenario,
OR
2) Describe applicable treatment technologies or alternatives for various contamination scenarios
for your chosen compound.
(Note: a treatment alternative may include a combination of treatment technologies.) You may want to choose the first approach if you have picked a contaminant that may be treated using a
wide variety of methods, for which there is a lot of available information, but you’d like to research only
a few of those technologies in more detail. The second approach is more applicable if your contaminant
is typically treated by only 1 or 2 different technologies for a given matrix and if the contaminant is also
present in various matrices. This second approach is also appropriate if you are interested in gaining a
“big picture” overview of available treatment technologies for a given compound. For either case, discuss at least 4-5 different technologies in detail. At the very least, make sure that you
include information on the following for each technology: (1) the history and frequency of current use of
the technology to treat your contaminant in a given matrix, (2) a basic description of the technology
including a summary of the processes involved in treatment, and (3) the advantages and limitations
associated with the technology. You may also discuss case studies where the technology was applied to
treat your chosen contaminant. You should conclude your work with a critical evaluation/comparison of
the various technologies in terms of expected treatment effectiveness as well as advantages and
disadvantages of one technology over the other.
CIVL 6618 UNH Atrazine Removal by Sono Electrochemical UV Techniques Discussion