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Binary Logistic Regression in SPSS

Binary Logistic Regression in SPSS. I’m working on a Psychology question and need guidance to help me study.

PART 1
Binary Logistic Regression in SPSS
This week you will build on the simple logistic regression analysis did last week. You will use the same two variables (one independent variable and one dependent variable) you used in your SPSS analysis last week and add a second independent variable to the analysis. How has your statistical significance and odds ratio changed by the introduction of the second independent variable?
To prepare

Use the one independent variable and one dependent variable you used to conduct your simple logistic regression analysis in Week 4.
Add a second independent variable to your analysis (multiple logistic regression).
Remember that your dependent variable must be dichotomous/binary.
Think about how you might use the odds ratio in your analysis to simplify the interpretation of your results.
How has your statistical significance and odds ratio changed by the introduction of the second independent variable?

The Assignment
Use SPSS to answer the research question you constructed. Then, compose a 1- to 2-paragraph analysis in APA format including discussion of if the predictive relationship is statistically significant and the odds ratio and what it means.
Be sure to include your data output with your analysis. See page 1032 in your Warner textbook for an excellent APA-compliant write-up of a binary logistic regression analysis.
PART 2
Article Critique
The Assignment
Write a 2- to 3-page critique of the research you found in the Walden Library that includes responses to the following prompts:

Why did the authors select binary logistic regression in the research?
Do you think this test was the most appropriate choice? Why or why not?
Did the authors display the results in a figure or table?
Does the results table stand alone? In other words, are you able to interpret the study from it? Why or why not?

Binary Logistic Regression in SPSS

Research report on zoonotic diseases in South East Asia • Known zoonoses and associated health risks in humans o SARS/MERS o TB o Hepatitis E • Why are zoonoses a public health issue o How can they affect us and our lives • Are outbreaks of zoonotic diseases increasing? o If so why? • Potential for the emergence of novel zoonoses-what are the risk factors • Known reservoir species that zoonoses can spread from • Ways to avoid contracting zoonoses from wildlife I have a draft that I would like you to expand upon and add too it needs alot of work.

Write an essay that answers the question of whether or not minimum ages for activities such as drinking (21), marriage (18), and military service (18) should be lowered

Write an essay that answers the question of whether or not minimum ages for activities such as drinking (21), marriage (18), and military service (18) should be lowered.

This is an argumentative essay question.Romeo and Juliet is the story of two young lovers who would have to wait until they are 18 to get married if they live in California. However, in some states and countries, people can get married at 16.Write an essay that answers the question of whether or not minimum ages for activities such as drinking (21), marriage (18), and military service (18) should be lowered. You may discuss one or more than one of these in your essay.At least 1 paragraph in the essay should discuss the viewpoint that is opposite yours. If you choose only one activity (such as drinking), this means that your essay must be a minimum of 6 paragraphs rather than 5.
Write an essay that answers the question of whether or not minimum ages for activities such as drinking (21), marriage (18), and military service (18) should be lowered

Harmonisation of International Accounting Standards | Essay

programming assignment help Harmonisation of International Accounting Standards | Essay. In an increasingly global business environment, issues such as how companies account for their relevant financial positions in different jurisdictions gain greater importance. Many companies are international in their scope with several different subsidiaries in multiple jurisdictions making the interpretation of accounts particularly difficult. Accounting standards in every country are developed with the background of that country’s individual social and economic circumstances, which results in a range of differing standards being developed across the globe[1]. As a result, it is very difficult for accounts to be read accurately and to make suitable financial decisions on investment by entities from other jurisdictions. Comparing performances and consolidating accounts without at least a degree of international harmonisation would prove very difficult, if not impossible. The Importance of Harmonisation As a result of the problems mentioned above, a uniform set of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) have been developed with the view to mitigating or, in some cases, eliminating divergences in the way that accounts are reported in different jurisdictions. It is recognised that a blanket standardisation is simply impossible; countries need the flexibility and freedom to allow influences from their own social and economic backgrounds to come into play. For this reason, a process of harmonisation has been established. By having a guideline for the ways in which companies from different countries must deal with certain corporate issues, it makes the position of managers and investors much easier. Having a foundation of standards allows allocation choices in terms of resources and time to be made across jurisdictions. In order to do this, a like for like comparison must be possible and this can only be achieved with a degree of harmonisation. In particular, the area of taxation has gained a great deal of attention from international accounting standard setters. For example, Financial Reporting Standard 19 states how a company should deal with deferred taxation situations, i.e. where the point of realising the asset and the corresponding liability are different and how this can be accounted for in the company accounts. By ensuring companies across the globe are broadly following the same principles, it is much easier to ascertain the true financial position of the company in question. The International Accounting Standards Board The International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) is a wide group of people who are independent and are involved in the development and management of the International Financial Reporting Standards. The work of the IASB is supervised by the International Accounting Standards Committee and has additional support from external advisory committees. In total, there are fourteen board members, representing nine different countries, thus ensuring geographical diversity and representation during the standard setting process. The main work of the IASB is to work with the various different national accounting standard setters in a bid to ensure that there is a worldwide convergence of accounting standards being put in place. As mentioned previously, the aim is not to force nations into following one set of distinct rules, but rather to encourage a union of standards. The work of the IASB has been widely recognised, with more than 100 countries across the world either requiring or at least allowing the use of international accounting standards. This substantially increases the freedom of trade and investment on an international scale. International companies are able to ensure that consolidated accounts are prepared to produce useful and accurate accounts of the way in which the company is performing. This ability to draw accurate comparison is vital for the truly international scope of modern business[2]. Structure and Processes of the IASB Gaining harmonisation and convergence of accounting standards is clearly an important and useful element of international business. Achieving this is, however, a particularly difficult task. No international financial reporting standard can be passed and agreed on without the due process being followed. International agreement is vital, if such convergence is going to be efficiently attained across the globe. The process is carried out in six stages, each of which is open to debate and is overseen by the executive committees. Firstly, the agenda is set. During this process, the IASB will look at the issue being raised, the current approaches being taken by the various different countries and the realistic possibility of achieving greater harmonisation. On the assumption that further harmonisation is thought possible, the IASB will then consider and set out the scope of the international standard that is envisaged. Secondly, the project of establishing the accounting standard is planned fully to ensure the maximum possible buy-in from the various countries. Crucially, at this point, the IASB will decide if it is going to act alone in establishing the standard or whether it requires the assistance of other standard setting bodies[3]. Thirdly, once the project is fully understood, a discussion paper is published. This will state the issues as the IASB sees it and the possible solutions that exist for the problem. This is absolutely crucial. The work of the IASB relies almost entirely upon the agreement of the participating countries and, therefore, opening the discussion up to these countries is vital. Fourthly, once the discussion stage has been duly undertaken, an exposure draft is issued with details of the proposed solution. This is essential as it will be at this point that many countries will raise objections or make further suggestions. Fifthly, all of these processes are put together and the standard itself is drafted and published. It takes into account all comments and issues raised during the discussion paper and exposure draft. Finally, after the standard has been issued, the IASB will review the uptake and the way it has been applied by the various countries. It may be that further amendments or new standards are needed and the process will then restart. The entire process is based on discussion and co-operation, which is vital if any form of harmonisation can be truly efficient[4]. Challenges to Harmonisation Harmonisation is clearly beneficial for international trade and businesses. However, such large scale convergence is going to be difficult to manage and achieve; firstly, as the standards have to be incorporated into the national standards set by every individual country. This requires the relevant countries to be on board and prepared to support the various international standards being developed. Naturally, the support that is being shown for this is different between the various countries, with the more affluent countries being able to comply more readily because of their advanced accounting structure[5]. Secondly, the changing of the way in which accounts are presented is not always a quick or cheap process, which can cause difficulties for some smaller companies. In some cases, the adoption of certain international standards will result in the reported profits of the company falsely appearing substantially lower than the previous year. For this reason, some companies will naturally be slower or more hesitant to adopt the new standards. Where there is resistance, the IASB does not have the power or teeth to enforce the standards. This lack of ability to enforce can ultimately make the process of ensuring total international harmonisation extremely difficult and potentially impossible. Conclusions The IASB plays an absolutely vital role in the move towards gaining an internationally harmonised set of accounting standards. All of the work undertaken by the IASB is mindful of the need to achieve co-operation between all countries and, as such, has been structured in the way that it establishes standards through the process of discussion and explanatory documents, encouraging the accession of all relevant parties, at every step of the way. In doing so, the chances of international harmonisation are much greater and this will bring with it all of the benefits of internationally usable accounts. Bibliography Bazaz, Mohammed S., International Accounting: A Global Perspective, Issues in Accounting Education, Vol. 20, 2005 Collins, Katherine, International Accounting Rate Reform: The Role of International Organizations and Implications for Developing Countries, Law and Policy in International Business, Vol. 31, 2000 Fleming, Peter D., The Growing Importance of International Accounting Standards; Arthur R. Wyatt, Chairman of the International Accounting Standards Committee, Heralds International Harmonization, Journal of Accountancy, Vol. 172, 1991 Gornik-Tomaszewski, Sylwia, Mccarthy, Irene N., Cooperation between FASB and IASB to Achieve Convergence of Accounting Standards, Review of Business, Vol. 24, 2003 Heely, James A., Nersesian, Roy L. Global Management Accounting: A Guide for Executives of International Corporations, Quorum Books, 1993 Holmes, Geoffrey Andrew, Sugden, Alan, Holmes, Geoffrey, Gee, Paul, Interpreting Company Reports and Accounts, Pearson Education, 2004 Larson, Robert K., An Empirical Investigation of the Relationships between International Accounting Standards, Equity Markets and Economic Growth in Developing Countries, Journal of International Business Studies, Vol. 25, 1994 Nobes, Christopher, Parker, Robert, Comparative International Accounting, Pearson Education, 2006 Rider, Barry, in Villiers, Charlotte (ed.), Corporate Reporting and Company Law, Cambridge University Press, 2006 Rodgers, Paul, International Accounting Standards: From UK Standards to IAS, an Accelerated Route to Understanding the Key Principles of International Accounting Rules, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2007 Sale, J. Timothy, Salter, Stephen B, Sharp, David J., Advances in International Accounting, Elsevier, 2004 Schipper, Katherine, Principles-Based Accounting Standards, Accounting Horizons, Vol. 17, 2003 Schwartz, Donald, The Future of Financial Accounting: Universal Standards, Journal of Accountancy, Vol. 181, 1996 van Greuning, Hennie, Koen, Marius, International Accounting Standards: A Practical Guide, World Bank Publications, 2001 Footnotes [1] Holmes, Geoffrey Andrew, Sugden, Alan, Holmes, Geoffrey, Gee, Paul, Interpreting Company Reports and Accounts, Pearson Education, 2004 [2] van Greuning, Hennie, Koen, Marius, International Accounting Standards: A Practical Guide, World Bank Publications, 2001 [3] Collins, Katherine, International Accounting Rate Reform: The Role of International Organizations and Implications for Developing Countries, Law and Policy in International Business, Vol. 31, 2000 [4] Rider, Barry in, Villiers, Charlotte (ed.), Corporate Reporting and Company Law, Cambridge University Press, 2006 [5] Rodgers, Paul, International Accounting Standards: From UK Standards to IAS, an Accelerated Route to Understanding the Key Principles of International Accounting Rules, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2007 Harmonisation of International Accounting Standards | Essay

The Parable Of Cloth Definition Essay

The Parable Of Cloth Definition Essay. The parable of cloth originated from a certain Buddhist monk called bikkhus, who narrates his encounter with the Blessed One. It states that the Blessed One gave bikkhus the parable saying that if unclean garment is absorbed in any dye regardless of its color, the cloth will still contain initial dirt and stains. The Blessed One was communicating that a bad life in the future must be expected when the mind is not pure. He also puts in that if a cloth is perfectly clean, it would look as beautiful as the colors, an indication of cleanliness. This parable contains deeper meaning that was a caution to the Buddhists. This parable clearly shows that being dirty or of bad morals will always reflect even on the outside. The parable continues to bring an understanding that bad morals may corrupt the good ones. The beautiful colors of pink, blue and, red represents some good and beautiful characters. However, when the dirty and soiled cloth is immersed in the dye, the beauty of the colors is not represented well because of the uncleanness. This parable evidently refers to people whose character is spoilt, as they tend to influence the good people with their temperament. This well suits an English saying, ‘bad company corrupts good morals.’ The parable also clearly states all the bad things that the dirty cloth represents, calling it the impurity of the mind. The parable is significant to the beliefs of the Buddhists because they believe that any change in people’s heart or mind always lead to change in external situations, and they affect the people who are around. They believe that enlightenment summons the people’s image practicing severity in the pursuit for extraordinary powers, which are beyond the reach by ordinary beings. Nichiren said that enlightenment could be referred to as the fusion of wisdom that was subjected to people with objective reality, a complete knowledge of the truths of this world. In addition, any individual cannot reach enlightenment because it is not in a fixed point. It would also mean daily challenge, constant as well as the people’s determination of being renewed to impose positive impact other people’s lives. The parable of cloth is one that the Buddhist would passionately embrace because they believe in change and impacting others with the changes or enlightenment. A bikkhus can share the choicest rice with all manner of sauces and curry without causing any harm to his spiritual life, when he shuns all the bad and impurity things and embracing what is considered as the source of truth. A bikkhus is capable of attaining this state of virtue in wisdom and mental discipline. As the parable explains, when the dirty and soiled cloth is dipped into the clear water, it becomes pure. Moreover, just as the way gold is refined through the furnace becomes clean and pure, the bikkhus with this state of virtue cannot be harmed. The desire for such things however, would be a hindrance to enlightenment because the repetition of the same would bring impurities, which will drag the positive influence of the people around. Conclusively, the parable of cloth originated from a certain Buddhist monk known as bikkhus, who narrates his encounter with the Blessed One. The parable brings an understanding that bad morals may corrupt the good ones. The Buddhist believe that enlightenment summons the people’s image practicing severity in the pursuit for extraordinary powers, which are beyond the reach by ordinary beings. The secret of being enlightened is shunning all impurities and embracing good virtues. The Parable Of Cloth Definition Essay

MATH 3A University of California Absolute Maximum and Minimum Value Problems

MATH 3A University of California Absolute Maximum and Minimum Value Problems.

I’m working on a mathematics test / quiz prep and need guidance to help me understand better.

I’m working on a mathematics question and need guidance to help me study.how all work neatly for credit. No work=no credit. Circle/Box your answers. Do not approximateunless asked to do so.Nographing calculatoror cellphone allowed on all tests.how all work neatly for credit. No work=no credit. Circle/Box your answers. Do not approximateunless asked to do so.Nographing calculatoror cellphone allowed on all tests.
MATH 3A University of California Absolute Maximum and Minimum Value Problems