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Ashford University Future Financial Situation and Daily Decisions Discussion

Ashford University Future Financial Situation and Daily Decisions Discussion.

Reflect: Think about your past, present, and future financial situation. Consider how each decision you make today will affect your financial future. These daily decisions can affect your finances and ultimate freedom to make decisions in the future positively or negatively, such as your ability to buy a home or to purchase a new vehicle. Over the past five weeks, you have learned the significance of using digital tools to support your needs and goals as a responsible digital citizen. Digital tools can also help you achieve and maintain financial freedom in your personal, academic, and professional life. Write: For this discussion, address ONE of the following prompts:Option 1:Visit one of the following web pages Calculators-Your Life, Your Money (Links to an external site.) or Financial Calculators (Links to an external site.). Select one financial calculator that interests you.Discuss one generalized financial goal for yourself and your family.Identify one financial calculator you could use to reach this goal.From Module 10.1 Strategies for Success: Tips for Saving from your course textbook, select one tip and explain how it will help you reach this financial goal.Option 2:Consider the following scenario:Your good friend Kyle would like to go back to school to complete a bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education so that he can fulfill his dreams of teaching 2nd grade. Years ago, he started college, but work and life responsibilities got in the way of him finishing. He knows that you recently enrolled at Ashford University and wants to ask your advice as he plans his next move. In order to help pay for his tuition, he plans to borrow student loans. Kyle tells you that he wants to borrow the maximum amount of available loan money to buy his kids new shoes and go on a vacation to Hawaii.Based on the scenario above, address each of the following:Identify at least two pieces of useful information about student loans that Kyle should know to ensure he borrows responsibly. Review the Student Aid (Links to an external site.) website for suggestions.Describe a potential repercussion of borrowing the maximum amount of available loan money.From Module 10.1 Strategies for Success: Tips for Saving of your course textbook, select one tip that you would suggest for Kyle to use to help him reach his financial goal of going on a vacation to Hawaii.Your post should be at least 250 words.
Ashford University Future Financial Situation and Daily Decisions Discussion

detecting fake news. I don’t understand this Nursing question and need help to study.

http://medicine.news/2017-05-23-142-million-dollar…

1) Describe how you felt when reading the articles and watching the videos.
2) What might be a negative impact that the presented information may have on your nursing practice?
3) What are some health care related consequences that may occur due to the information presented?

detecting fake news

Interest rates as defines by various scholars could be referred to as the price on borrowed capital. It could also be perceived as the return on financial assets or on investible funds. Further more, the rate of interest is a payment from borrowers to lenders which compensates the latter for parting with funds for a period of time and at some risk. Put into real terms, it is often said that lenders are being encouraged to forego consumption now in conditions of comparative uncertainty, in return for consumption later, in an uncertain future. In rewarding savers with parting with funds, a rate of interest is strictly speaking rewarding savers for giving up the ability to consume if they should change their mind about savings. After all, there is a perfectly rationale case to be made for people to save (forego actual consumption) at zero, or even negative, real interest rates since they will wish to provide for old age or other future periods of zero income. Types of Interest rates: There are basically two types of interest rates, namely; nominal interest rates and real interest rates. Nominal interest rate is the actual interest payment by the borrower of funds or on financial assets/instrument for the use of borrowed or loaned funds. It is the rate that is actually paid in money form. It is usually denoted as i in mathematical equation. Real interest rate on the other hand is the effective rate paid on borrowed or loaned funds over the tenure or maturity of the loan. It is the interest rate paid or received after taking account of inflation. Real interest rate is denoted as r and inflation rate written as Ï€. Thus i = r Ï€. Given the definition and explanation of interest rate as a measure of reward for savings, reward for investments and what consumers get for the consumption postponed. For instance, investment in money market securities like treasury bills, commercial paper/banker acceptances, bonds and bank deposits give investors returns expressed as yield, discounts, coupon and interest payments respectively on their investments. Capital market investments like shares, provide dividend in return to investors. All as a measure of interest rate on investment terms. Macro Economic Objectives; All over the world, every government and regulatory authorities pursue economic policy objectives as listed below of which interest rate is used as one of the tools to achieve any of the goals. These include: Economic growth without environmental degradation Full employment of resources Income distribution Balance of payment equilibrium Price stability Efficient allocation of resources… and for outside economy, Full freedom of cross-border capital movement A fixed exchange rate Economic theory of interest rates Howells and Bain 2005:183 posited that discussion on interest rates cannot be exhaustively illustrated without making reference to the relevant economic theories on same. The classical theory, Neo-Classical theory which propounded the Loanable fund Theory and as well as the Keynesian and Monetary positions on interest rates which stipulated Liquidity Preference theory on interest rate. Classical theory – principally propounded by Fisherian. He posited that interest rate is an equilibrating factor between the demand for and supply of money. Thus, interest rate is the price at which the two are equated. Classical concluded that interest rate is a long run phenomenon and at the long run, the rates which prevails is determined exclusively by real forces of investment and savings. In this instance, classical assume that savings is the only sources of investible funds and both savings and investments are interest eligible. In addition, savings means an increasing function of interest rate while investment is a decreasing function of interest rates. The theory based its conclusion on some underlying assumptions; like prices flexibility exists. The economy will always be at full employment. And interest rate has no relationship with monetary factors because money supply is exogenously determined. This it denoted as follows: S = S (r) I = I (r) Neo-Classical theory – Also referred to as Loanable fund Theory: This was developed by Knut Wicksell and further developed by Gurnar Myrdel, Eric Lindelle, Bent Hansen and Bert Hollids. They are all economist that belong to the Scottish school of economic thought. Neo-classical theory of interest rate is thus a refining and an attempt to modernise as well as remove the inherent shortcomings of the classical theory of interest rates. Knut Wicksell introduced credit money into the classical theory as well as hoarding i.e beside savings and investment, the loanable fund theory recognises the role of banks in credit creation as well as the role of the public in hoarding, which form part of money supply balancing. The inclusion of credit money into the equation results in increase in the amount of funds available in the banks. To attract investors, the interest rates must fall Wicksell contended that the credit money has no relationship with interest rates. He identified two types of interest rates, namely; The natural interest rates (r n) The market interest rates (r m) The market interest rates is below the natural interest rate. The Wicksellian theory was refined by his colleagues such as Gurner Myrdel, Eric Lindelle, Bent Hansen

Purdue University Civil Litigation Deposition Pre Trial Discovery Document Draft

Purdue University Civil Litigation Deposition Pre Trial Discovery Document Draft.

PA110-4: Draft a pre-trial discovery document in a civil lawsuit.Assignment: Draft deposition summariesInstructions:For this assignment, you will draft deposition summaries, also called deposition digests, in the Arkansas Bus Collision Case. Do not include the entire transcript of the deposition. Rather, prepare a summary or digest of the information provided by the experts during the depositions The purpose of the digest is to have a quick reference guide to the testimony for a motion for summary judgment and if the case goes to trial. If you want, you can use theDeposition Summary Template.The recorded depositions are available at the link below.https://media.pearsoncmg.com/ph/chet/careersresour…***Date: Today’s DateTo: ParalegalFrom: Roy SaundersRe: Deposition SummariesI need you to prepare deposition digests or summaries for two expert witnesses in the Arkansas Bus Collision Case. In order to prepare for trial, it is necessary to have a quick reference guide to the testimony. Prepare deposition summaries for both Dr. Lee, the treating physician, and Eric Mitford, an expert on brake failure. For sample deposition summaries, consider running an Internet search for “deposition summary example” or something similar. Do not include a word-for-word transcript but rather include a brief summary of the testimony that can be used as a quick reference guide.
Purdue University Civil Litigation Deposition Pre Trial Discovery Document Draft

The History of Cocktail Drinks

assignment writer The word “cocktail” may conjure up a picture of pleasant surroundings, subdued lighting, quiet background music, and behind the bar a friendly barman who takes his task of mixing your drink seriously. Or you may imagine yourself beside the pool on sunny tropical island, with a tall glass of exotic fruit juice, liqueur and crushed ice in your hand. Whatever fantasy comes to mind, “cocktail” is the coolest and fantasy drink around at the moment. How the cocktail got its name, and by whom it was first created, is a subject of considerable debate. One of theory is that an American barman had a large container in the shape of a cockerel into which he poured leftover drinks. Hard-up customers could buy this cheap mixture, and were served from a tap at the tail, hence a “cocktail”. A different story comes from the time of the American Revolution. A Frenchman, after seeing bottles decorated with cocks’ tails in Betsy’s Tavern near Yorktown, gave the toast “Vive le cocktail” Yet another definition of the word refers to the special way of cutting a horse’s tail – but the connection between a horse’s tail and drinking a rather delicate blend of spirit, liqueur and fruit juice is not clear (Whitaker,

What do I do now? Each week we read Kindred (Weeks 12-13) and Parable of the Sower (Weeks 14-15), you’ll be reading Butler’s text AND ancillary texts YOU select–see the calendar at the bottom of this page. You are expected to read both Butler and ancillary texts each week, in order to develop a deeper understanding of how they’re connected AND to practice rhetorical listening. You don’t need to read/watch them ALL at once (that, in my view, is too much). However, you should pick a few to read/watch each week, as part of the 5–8 hours you spend on reading Butler’s text and the ancillary texts below. Most likely, by Week 15, you’ll have read most of the texts. You are also welcome to REread/REwatch texts. I know I’ve watched several of the videos multiple times, as well as some of the texts, and I find that rereading helps me to deepen my understanding. The ultimate goal is the completion of a creative work inspired by one or both novels and the ancillary texts. This final creative work will be turned in Week 16. Ancillary Texts: Texts to Choose From Combahee River Collective Statement (Links to an external site.) Corrine Segal, “Decades Ago, Octavia Butler Saw a ‘Grim Future’ of Climate Denial and Income Inequality” (Links to an external site.)(interview and article) “Reading Women on Afrofuturism and Parable of the Sower” (Links to an external site.) (panel) Emily Temple, “How Octavia Butler’s Radical Vision of Femininity Inspired The OA” (Links to an external site.) (article) National Museum of African American History and Culture, The Revolutionary Practice of Black Feminisms (Links to an external site.) (website) Marian Jones, “What Are Identity Politics? A Vision of Solidarity Rooted in Black Feminism” (Links to an external site.) (op-ed) Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “We Should All Be Feminists” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Kimberlé Crenshaw, “The Urgency of Intersectionality” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Alice Walker, “Definition of Womanist” (Links to an external site.) (one-page excerpt) Patricia Hill Collins,”What’s In a Name? Womanism, Black Feminism, and Beyond” (Links to an external site.) (scholarly article) “Feminist Criticism (1960s–present),” (Links to an external site.) OWL at Purdue (webpage) Movies/TV: I’ve selected a few movies/shows below that have similar themes, dilemmas, and conflicts. As you watch, rhetorically listen for overlap, for similarities and differences, and more. Star Trek: Discovery (CBS) Handmaid’s Tale (Hulu) Beyonce, Lemonade Solange, A Seat at the Table Janelle Monaê, Dirty Computer (Links to an external site.) Key Questions You will likely come up with your own questions–in fact, you should–however, to get started, I’ve compiled a few questions below: What is Black feminism? Who are some of the thinkers within Black feminism? In the movies, TV, and/or music, what themes do you see that relate to what you’ve learned about Black feminism? What examples support your insights? How and why did Black feminism come to be? What were some of the initial themes and questions posed by Black feminists? Both Kindred and Parable center Black woman characters. What are some of the challenges they face? How do the lead characters in Kindred and Parable navigate the challenges they face? More to come! Quick note: Butler doesn’t consider Kindred a sci-fi novel. Quick Links Page: Week 12 Page: Continue working on WE5 and begin reading Kindred (Week 12) Module: Resources for Writing Experience 5 (Butler’s Kindred and Parable of the Sower) Reading Guide: Kindred Kindred, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Parable of the Sower, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Short video about accessing these ebooks Contact me Calendar Week 11: Introduction to Octavia Butler, Genre of Comics, and Rhetorical Listening Week 12: Kindred, “Introduction” to “The Fight” (pp. iv—167) and ancillary texts Week 13: Kindred, “The Storm” and “Epilogue” (pp. 168—237) and ancillary texts Week 14: Parable of the Sower, “Introduction” to “2026” (pp. iv—120) and ancillary texts Week 15: Parable of the Sower, “2027” (pp. 121—262) and ancillary texts Week 16: Finish and post WE5

What do I do now? Each week we read Kindred (Weeks 12-13) and Parable of the Sower (Weeks 14-15), you’ll be reading Butler’s text AND ancillary texts YOU select–see the calendar at the bottom of this page. You are expected to read both Butler and ancillary texts each week, in order to develop a deeper understanding of how they’re connected AND to practice rhetorical listening. You don’t need to read/watch them ALL at once (that, in my view, is too much). However, you should pick a few to read/watch each week, as part of the 5–8 hours you spend on reading Butler’s text and the ancillary texts below. Most likely, by Week 15, you’ll have read most of the texts. You are also welcome to REread/REwatch texts. I know I’ve watched several of the videos multiple times, as well as some of the texts, and I find that rereading helps me to deepen my understanding. The ultimate goal is the completion of a creative work inspired by one or both novels and the ancillary texts. This final creative work will be turned in Week 16. Ancillary Texts: Texts to Choose From Combahee River Collective Statement (Links to an external site.) Corrine Segal, “Decades Ago, Octavia Butler Saw a ‘Grim Future’ of Climate Denial and Income Inequality” (Links to an external site.)(interview and article) “Reading Women on Afrofuturism and Parable of the Sower” (Links to an external site.) (panel) Emily Temple, “How Octavia Butler’s Radical Vision of Femininity Inspired The OA” (Links to an external site.) (article) National Museum of African American History and Culture, The Revolutionary Practice of Black Feminisms (Links to an external site.) (website) Marian Jones, “What Are Identity Politics? A Vision of Solidarity Rooted in Black Feminism” (Links to an external site.) (op-ed) Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “We Should All Be Feminists” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Kimberlé Crenshaw, “The Urgency of Intersectionality” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Alice Walker, “Definition of Womanist” (Links to an external site.) (one-page excerpt) Patricia Hill Collins,”What’s In a Name? Womanism, Black Feminism, and Beyond” (Links to an external site.) (scholarly article) “Feminist Criticism (1960s–present),” (Links to an external site.) OWL at Purdue (webpage) Movies/TV: I’ve selected a few movies/shows below that have similar themes, dilemmas, and conflicts. As you watch, rhetorically listen for overlap, for similarities and differences, and more. Star Trek: Discovery (CBS) Handmaid’s Tale (Hulu) Beyonce, Lemonade Solange, A Seat at the Table Janelle Monaê, Dirty Computer (Links to an external site.) Key Questions You will likely come up with your own questions–in fact, you should–however, to get started, I’ve compiled a few questions below: What is Black feminism? Who are some of the thinkers within Black feminism? In the movies, TV, and/or music, what themes do you see that relate to what you’ve learned about Black feminism? What examples support your insights? How and why did Black feminism come to be? What were some of the initial themes and questions posed by Black feminists? Both Kindred and Parable center Black woman characters. What are some of the challenges they face? How do the lead characters in Kindred and Parable navigate the challenges they face? More to come! Quick note: Butler doesn’t consider Kindred a sci-fi novel. Quick Links Page: Week 12 Page: Continue working on WE5 and begin reading Kindred (Week 12) Module: Resources for Writing Experience 5 (Butler’s Kindred and Parable of the Sower) Reading Guide: Kindred Kindred, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Parable of the Sower, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Short video about accessing these ebooks Contact me Calendar Week 11: Introduction to Octavia Butler, Genre of Comics, and Rhetorical Listening Week 12: Kindred, “Introduction” to “The Fight” (pp. iv—167) and ancillary texts Week 13: Kindred, “The Storm” and “Epilogue” (pp. 168—237) and ancillary texts Week 14: Parable of the Sower, “Introduction” to “2026” (pp. iv—120) and ancillary texts Week 15: Parable of the Sower, “2027” (pp. 121—262) and ancillary texts Week 16: Finish and post WE5. Paper details What do I do now? Each week we read Kindred (Weeks 12-13) and Parable of the Sower (Weeks 14-15), you’ll be reading Butler’s text AND ancillary texts YOU select–see the calendar at the bottom of this page. You are expected to read both Butler and ancillary texts each week, in order to develop a deeper understanding of how they’re connected AND to practice rhetorical listening. You don’t need to read/watch them ALL at once (that, in my view, is too much). However, you should pick a few to read/watch each week, as part of the 5–8 hours you spend on reading Butler’s text and the ancillary texts below. Most likely, by Week 15, you’ll have read most of the texts. You are also welcome to REread/REwatch texts. I know I’ve watched several of the videos multiple times, as well as some of the texts, and I find that rereading helps me to deepen my understanding. The ultimate goal is the completion of a creative work inspired by one or both novels and the ancillary texts. This final creative work will be turned in Week 16. Ancillary Texts: Texts to Choose From Combahee River Collective Statement (Links to an external site.) Corrine Segal, “Decades Ago, Octavia Butler Saw a ‘Grim Future’ of Climate Denial and Income Inequality” (Links to an external site.)(interview and article) “Reading Women on Afrofuturism and Parable of the Sower” (Links to an external site.) (panel) Emily Temple, “How Octavia Butler’s Radical Vision of Femininity Inspired The OA” (Links to an external site.) (article) National Museum of African American History and Culture, The Revolutionary Practice of Black Feminisms (Links to an external site.) (website) Marian Jones, “What Are Identity Politics? A Vision of Solidarity Rooted in Black Feminism” (Links to an external site.) (op-ed) Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “We Should All Be Feminists” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Kimberlé Crenshaw, “The Urgency of Intersectionality” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Alice Walker, “Definition of Womanist” (Links to an external site.) (one-page excerpt) Patricia Hill Collins,”What’s In a Name? Womanism, Black Feminism, and Beyond” (Links to an external site.) (scholarly article) “Feminist Criticism (1960s–present),” (Links to an external site.) OWL at Purdue (webpage) Movies/TV: I’ve selected a few movies/shows below that have similar themes, dilemmas, and conflicts. As you watch, rhetorically listen for overlap, for similarities and differences, and more. Star Trek: Discovery (CBS) Handmaid’s Tale (Hulu) Beyonce, Lemonade Solange, A Seat at the Table Janelle Monaê, Dirty Computer (Links to an external site.) Key Questions You will likely come up with your own questions–in fact, you should–however, to get started, I’ve compiled a few questions below: What is Black feminism? Who are some of the thinkers within Black feminism? In the movies, TV, and/or music, what themes do you see that relate to what you’ve learned about Black feminism? What examples support your insights? How and why did Black feminism come to be? What were some of the initial themes and questions posed by Black feminists? Both Kindred and Parable center Black woman characters. What are some of the challenges they face? How do the lead characters in Kindred and Parable navigate the challenges they face? More to come! Quick note: Butler doesn’t consider Kindred a sci-fi novel. Quick Links Page: Week 12 Page: Continue working on WE5 and begin reading Kindred (Week 12) Module: Resources for Writing Experience 5 (Butler’s Kindred and Parable of the Sower) Reading Guide: Kindred Kindred, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Parable of the Sower, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Short video about accessing these ebooks Contact me Calendar Week 11: Introduction to Octavia Butler, Genre of Comics, and Rhetorical Listening Week 12: Kindred, “Introduction” to “The Fight” (pp. iv—167) and ancillary texts Week 13: Kindred, “The Storm” and “Epilogue” (pp. 168—237) and ancillary texts Week 14: Parable of the Sower, “Introduction” to “2026” (pp. iv—120) and ancillary texts Week 15: Parable of the Sower, “2027” (pp. 121—262) and ancillary texts Week 16: Finish and post WE5 What do you need to turn in? You will be turning in the following: Your creative work (select from Options 1–7 listed on the prompt); a written rationale; And a Works Cited page that cites the novel(s) AND the ancillary texts that are informing your creative work. Please be sure ALL three components above are present/available. If you’re missing components, the writing experience will be marked “incomplete” until all components are available. How do you turn it in? You can upload it as a document, a Google Drive file link, a One Drive link, etc. Be sure all components (1. creative work, 2. rationale, 3. Works Cited) are included. If submitting a Google Drive file link (Links to an external site.) OR a One Drive link, be sure to provide access so others and I can see it. If it’s inaccessible, it’ll be marked incomplete until you notify me that it’s accessible. What are the expectations for this writing experience? The prompt notes the following: Responding to your own original question based on rhetorical listening to Kindred and/or Parable and other texts Demonstrating genre awareness (e.g. podcast, film) by using rhetorical tools of that genre to communicate with audience Writing/written portion incorporates Kindred and/or Parable and other texts The writing for this writing experience should be as long as it needs to be andshould cite the sources (Links to an external site.) (e.g. in text citations and Works Cited page) in a way that fits the genre WE5: “Make People FEEL! FEEL! FEEL!”: Octavia Butler’s Novels Kindred and Parable of the Sower Handwritten note that says, “Tell stories filled with facts. Make people touch taste and know. Make people FEEL! FEEL! FEEL!” Octavia E. Butler grew up in Pasadena, and later in her life started taking classes at Pasadena City College. When I began writing science fiction, when I began reading, heck, I wasn’t in any of this stuff I read. The only black people you found were occasional characters or characters who were so feeble-witted that they couldn’t manage anything, anyway. I wrote myself in, since I’m me and I’m here and I’m writing.[1] Butler is considered by many to be one of the most important science fiction writers and has certainly influenced many current writers and artists, like John Jennings, Nnedi Okorafor, and others. As the Huntington Library notes, “Climate change concerned her, as did politics, the pharmaceutical industry, and a variety of social issues” and she researched the science in her writings[2]. (The Huntington Library currently houses Butler’s archive, including drafts, photos, and handwritten notes–see Fig. 1 for an example). For this writing experience, you’ll be working with the novels Kindred and Parable of the Sower, written by Octavia Butler, a Black science fiction/ fantasy writer. About Kindred Kindred (Links to an external site.), adapted by Damian Duffy and John Jennings, turned her 1979 horror novel into a graphic novel. I am so excited that you’ll be able to read this amazing and powerful story in this medium. In one interview, Butler shared this story—one she shared often—about an experience she had in college: she met a “Black guy [who was] saying, ‘I wish I could kill all these old Black people that have been holding us back for so long, but I can’t because I have to start with my own parents.’” This guy was a friend of hers, and, as she says, I realized that, even though he knew a lot more than I did about Black history, it was all cerebral. He wasn’t feeling any of it. He was the kind that would have killed and died, as opposed to surviving and hanging on and hoping and working for change. And I thought about my mother, because she used to take me to work with her when she couldn’t get a babysitter and I was too young to be left alone, and I saw her going in the back door, and I saw people saying things to her that she didn’t like but couldn’t respond to. I heard people say in her hearing, ‘Well, I don’t really like colored people.’ And she kept working, and she put me through school, she bought her house—all the stuff she did. I realized that he didn’t understand what heroism was. That’s what I want to write about: when you are aware of what it means to be an adult and what choices you want to make, the fact that maybe you’re afraid, but you still have to act.[3] This quote helps us to understand why she wrote it and what window—maybe even a sliding glass door—she felt people needed to have in order to truly understand what the experiences of people who are and were marginalized, especially enslaved people, were like. The novel also goes beyond just understanding marginalization and branches in different directions, including some of which are highlighted in the prompts below. Kindred[4] deals with a wide array of topics, including human cruelty, racism, kin, interracial dynamics, enslavement, survival, violence, literacy, law, love, and more. About Parable of the Sower Butler’s sci-fi novel Parable of the Sower (Links to an external site.), also adapted by Duffy and Jennings, focuses on fifteen-year-old Lauren Olamina as she encounters a dystopic United States in the year 2024 (the book was originally published in 1993). In a 1994 interview with Jelani Cobb, Octavia Butler shares what “stirs [her] up”: Well, a lot of things actually. One of the great things about science fiction is the freedom it allows me to get into anything I want to get into. When I wrote Parable of the Sower, the things that stirred me up the most were the things going on right now. The daily news. There are so many terrible things that are going on that no one is paying attention to because they aren’t quite that bad yet.[5] In Parable, Butler imagines a world that is facing environmental disasters: Global warming is a character in Parable of the Sower. That’s why they’re having so [much] difficulty with water. When I went to Peru, on the coast where lima is, the mountains are memorable because they’re so utterly barren, like the moon. Is thought, ‘Is this what Southern California could look like after a few decades of Global Warming?’ That’s what I pictures: a place where they’re really enthusiastic because it’s raining, and it hasn’t rained for five years, where there are water stations the way there are gas stations…. I don’t go on and on about it, just let my characters feel the effects of it. It’s the reason for the terrible storms and the disease…[6] In addition to the topics that Kindred deals with, Parable also considers disease, religion, the effects of man-made environmental disasters, and more. Audience Someone who is pretty familiar with Kindred and Parable (they know the basic plot and characters’ names). Prompt Options As you may or may not know, part of my field of study is rhetoric. I am passionate about understanding how language and literature are shaped by contexts and how they shape their contexts, and that includes how rhetoric (which I define as the ability to see and use the available means of persuasion within a given situation) is being used, its impact on audiences, and its context(s). I came across Krista Ratcliffe’s work on rhetorical listening several years ago and, for me, it addressed a need I saw in my first-year writing courses and in my professional and personal practices: how do we listen more intentionally to others? What does it mean, in fact, to listen?[7] Ratcliffe argues that listening is not the same as reading nor is it unimportant. In fact, she makes a case for writing teachers and others to incorporate more listening strategies and practice into the classroom and to understand listening as a tool for invention. (You can see a ten-minute video discussing rhetorical listening here (Links to an external site.) and one of Ratcliffe’s scholarly articles here (Links to an external site.)) All of the options are set up to practice the skill of rhetorical listening: Defined generally as a trope for interpretative invention, rhetorical listening signifies a stance of openness that a person may choose to assume in relation to any person, text, or culture. Defined more particularly as a code of cross-cultural conduct, rhetorical listening signifies a stance of openness that a person may choose to assume in cross-cultural exchanges.[8] Many of you have written to me privately, individual assignments, or on discussion boards about engaging others’ ideas, asking questions, and more—many of these, I believe, are issues of listening. This isn’t to say we’re not listening to each other. In fact, this has been an interactive and engaged online class. But I have thought a lot about your feedback and designed this writing experience to be, I hope, a chance for you to continue practicing those listening skills, alongside writing and reading skills. I don’t know yet what you will find when setting these various texts alongside Kindred and Parable of the Sower. I do know I look forward to engaging what you find when you listen, and I imagine your classmates will, too. Pick one option. Directions for all of these are roughly the same. Read and use the texts—Kindred and Parable of the Sower and the ancillary texts we’ll read alongside Butler’s two novels—to craft a creative response to at least ONE of the novels. Option 1: Music Curator/ DJ For one or both novels, create a song playlist. Decide if the playlist follows the novel sequentially, thematically, or some other way. Make the playlist accessible for everyone in the class to listen to (e.g. Spotify). In addition to the playlist, include a written or audio rationale where you discuss your creative choices and their connections to one of the two novels and the additional ancillary texts. Option 2: Designer Design costumes for some of the characters for one scene or several costumes for one character. Include setting backgrounds, as needed, to provide context for each costume. In addition to the designs, include a written or audio rationale where you discuss your creative choices and their connections to one of the two novels and the additional ancillary texts. Option 3: Science writer Parable, in particular, deals with a number of scientific issues, including disease and climate change. Research one of the scientific issues present in Parable, and design a problem-solution. You can deliver this as a paper or some other way (e.g. podcast, Instagram story, photo essay). Include a Works Cited page, as well, that references all sources you incorporated—directly or indirectly—in your writing. Option 4: Photographer Select a theme that is present in one or both Butler novels, and create an Instagram story, photo gallery (e.g. slideshow, PowerPoint) or photo essay that reflects that theme. Note: The photos should be YOUR original photos or photos that are available through creative commons licensing. Remember that if you use someone else’s photo, you MUST cite them since it’s not your original work. In addition to the photo slideshow or essay, include a written or audio rationale where you discuss your creative choices and their connections to one of the two novels and the additional ancillary texts. Option 5: Historical writer Kindred deals with two time periods (I won’t give anything away). Create an annotated bibliography or podcast that provides insight into the earlier time period that Kindred is set in. Use a wide range of sources to help readers better understand the setting that Butler is writing about. Include a Works Cited page, as well, that references all sources you incorporated—directly or indirectly—in your writing. Option 6: Film Director Select one of the novels and TWO of the novel’s scenes that would be difficult to direct. Explain the difficulties and how you’d approach them as a director. Make references, as appropriate, to other films, shows, books, etc. to show what you would do (or avoid). Option 7: Your own idea Come up with your own idea for a creative work. Share your proposal to me by Week 15. Expectations: What should you be practicing in this writing experience? Responding to your own original question based on rhetorical listening to Kindred and/or Parable and other texts Demonstrating genre awareness (e.g. podcast, film) by using rhetorical tools of that genre to communicate with audience Writing/written portion incorporates Kindred and/or Parable and other texts The writing for this writing experience should be as long as it needs to be and should cite the sources (e.g. in text citations and Works Cited page) in a way that fits the genre Process I will point out here that these steps are not necessarily sequential. It’s VERY beneficial to begin considering your prompt, though you may not want to decide your option until your nearly done with both books. Step 1. Read the prompt. (20 minutes) Step 2. Learn about Octavia Butler, the comics genre, and rhetorical listening. The first week will be devoted to learning about Butler through interviews and others’ writing about her, to getting more in-depth with the medium of comics (Never read a comic before? Do not worry!), and to understanding the concept of rhetorical listening. (2—4 hours) Step 3. Read and think critically about Kindred, Parable, and the ancillary texts. If this is your first time reading a comic book, take a look at this short and helpful article (Links to an external site.). I strongly recommend reading a few pages of Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation (Links to an external site.)—even for just 10 minutes—and then sit and think about what you read and your experience of reading. After you finish Kindred and the other text(s) OR as you read, I recommend practicing skills of rhetorical listening. Ratcliffe makes a distinction between reading and listening. (Links to an external site.) [W]e do not listen simply for what we can agree with or challenge, as is the habit of academic reading (in its multiple guises). Instead, we choose to listen also for the exiled excess and contemplate its relation to our culture and our selves. Such listening does not presume a naïve, relativistic empathy, such as ‘I’m OK, You’re OK’ but rather an ethical responsibility to argue for what we deem fair and just while simultaneously questioning that which we deem fair and just. Such listening, I argue, may help us invent, interpret, and ultimately judge differently in that perhaps we can hear things we cannot see. (203) So what does this mean in terms of practicing rhetorical listening in this particular writing experience? One of the things I suggest is sitting with. You may have noticed that I will write that in certain assignments in our class. I mean to sit and think about because often—for a variety of reasons and realities—we rush to write, respond. I ask that we sit with. Sit with the reading, which may look like reading a few pages and stopping and thinking about what I just read. It may be letting yourself ask new questions and then being reminded—while doing something completely different—of Kindred and going, Why am I thinking about Kindred in this moment? What’s happening here, what did I hear that reminds me of Kindred? Why is that the case? Another strategy I suggest, one that’s drawn from Ratcliffe directly, is “to locate identification in discursive spaces of both commonalities and differences, and… to accentuate commonalities and differences not only in claims but in cultural logics within which those claims function” (204). What do all these strategies mean? You can see an example where Ratcliffe describes how a student in her class did this in their thinking (see pp. 216—220 under “A Pedagogical Instance, or Listening to a Student’s Listening”) (Links to an external site.) (20—36 hours) Step 4. Jot down your findings, craft a question, and review different options. Remember that this is your “down draft”—just get ALL the ideas down. In fact, it’ll likely be scattered notes and messy: it will give you a chance to elaborate on some of the ideas you’re surfacing. As you read, think, and write your findings, you’ll create a question that will serve as a research question. (Check back on Canvas in Week 12 for more guidance about this). Think about the rhetorical situation (e.g. your audience, purpose), what your question is (or what your questions are). Then, consider what genre would be best for sharing your ideas. For example, if you’re especially intrigued by the similarities and differences between one of the novels and another time or current day, then you might consider doing the photographer option. If you’re really intrigued by the scientific questions that Parable poses, you might want to try the science writer option. (3—5 hours) Step 5. Look up models. All of the options play with different genres (e.g. playlist, photo essay), so it’s important to spend time understanding that genre and look up examples of that genre. What works well in that genre? Why is working? How is that work created specifically for a given audience to achieve a particular purpose? (1—2 hours) Step 6. Craft your creative work. Take time to craft your creative work. (4–??? hours) Step 7. Write your rationale. See here for a suggested format and set of questions to explore. (2—4 hours) Step 8. Get feedback from others. You can keep it simple by asking questions (e.g. What else can I elaborate on?) that will help you hone your writing craft and skills. You can also make time, as your schedule allows, to get substantial feedback on your writing. (1—2 hours) Step 9. Copy edit, double-check citations and the Works Cited page, and revise. Make the writing is the strongest it can be; reflects the best thinking you can do at this moment; and shows the time you spent reading, analyzing, writing, and revising. Check for spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Make sure ALL the quotes are cited by page (especially for the novels) and that you have an MLA-formatted Works Cited page. (1—2 hours) Step 10. Publish! Turn it in by June 4th on Canvas. Jump to Ancillary Texts: These texts will be assigned alongside Kindred and Parable to help us practice rhetorical listening. Each week (weeks 11—15), you will choose from some of these. They will be organized by topic/theme, and you can choose to read from one topic/theme each week OR skip around (and, of course, you’re welcome to read more than the required minimum). You may notice that some readings/texts are in more than one category. Written Rationale: Doing a video or audio option and need to know what the expectation is for writing? WE5 Module: Resources for Writing Experience 5 (Butler’s Kindred and Parable of the Sower) Weekly Overview for Reading Kindred and Parable of the Sower References [1] Huntington Library. Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories. 2017. https://www.huntington.org/octavia-butler (Links to an external site.) [2] Huntington Library. Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories. 2017. https://www.huntington.org/octavia-butler (Links to an external site.) [3] Brown, Charles. “Octavia E. Butler: Persistence.” Conversations with Octavia Butler, Ed. Consuela Francis, University of Press Mississippi, 2010, p. 182. [4] Butler didn’t consider Kindred a sci-fi novel. Parable is a sci-fi novel [5] Cobb, Jelani. “Interview with Octavia Butler.” Conversations with Octavia Butler, Ed. Consuela Francis, University of Press Mississippi, 2010, p. 54. [6] Brown, Charles. “Octavia Butler: Persistence.” Conversations with Octavia Butler, Ed. Consuela Francis, University of Press Mississippi, 2010, p. 184. [7] If you’ve taken my English 1A course, you know I assign an oral history project (Links to an external site.), which is one of the ways I regularly provide a writing experience almost entirely based on listening. [8] Ratcliffe, Krista. Rhetorical Listening: Identification, Gender, Whiteness. Southern Illinois UP, 2005. What do I do now? Each week we read Kindred (Weeks 12-13) and Parable of the Sower (Weeks 14-15), you’ll be reading Butler’s text AND ancillary texts YOU select–see the calendar at the bottom of this page. You are expected to read both Butler and ancillary texts each week, in order to develop a deeper understanding of how they’re connected AND to practice rhetorical listening. You don’t need to read/watch them ALL at once (that, in my view, is too much). However, you should pick a few to read/watch each week, as part of the 5–8 hours you spend on reading Butler’s text and the ancillary texts below. Most likely, by Week 15, you’ll have read most of the texts. You are also welcome to REread/REwatch texts. I know I’ve watched several of the videos multiple times, as well as some of the texts, and I find that rereading helps me to deepen my understanding. The ultimate goal is the completion of a creative work inspired by one or both novels and the ancillary texts. This final creative work will be turned in Week 16. Ancillary Texts: Texts to Choose From Combahee River Collective Statement (Links to an external site.) Corrine Segal, “Decades Ago, Octavia Butler Saw a ‘Grim Future’ of Climate Denial and Income Inequality” (Links to an external site.)(interview and article) “Reading Women on Afrofuturism and Parable of the Sower” (Links to an external site.) (panel) Emily Temple, “How Octavia Butler’s Radical Vision of Femininity Inspired The OA” (Links to an external site.) (article) National Museum of African American History and Culture, The Revolutionary Practice of Black Feminisms (Links to an external site.) (website) Marian Jones, “What Are Identity Politics? A Vision of Solidarity Rooted in Black Feminism” (Links to an external site.) (op-ed) Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, “We Should All Be Feminists” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Kimberlé Crenshaw, “The Urgency of Intersectionality” (Links to an external site.) (TED Talk) Alice Walker, “Definition of Womanist” (Links to an external site.) (one-page excerpt) Patricia Hill Collins,”What’s In a Name? Womanism, Black Feminism, and Beyond” (Links to an external site.) (scholarly article) “Feminist Criticism (1960s–present),” (Links to an external site.) OWL at Purdue (webpage) Movies/TV: I’ve selected a few movies/shows below that have similar themes, dilemmas, and conflicts. As you watch, rhetorically listen for overlap, for similarities and differences, and more. Star Trek: Discovery (CBS) Handmaid’s Tale (Hulu) Beyonce, Lemonade Solange, A Seat at the Table Janelle Monaê, Dirty Computer (Links to an external site.) Key Questions You will likely come up with your own questions–in fact, you should–however, to get started, I’ve compiled a few questions below: What is Black feminism? Who are some of the thinkers within Black feminism? In the movies, TV, and/or music, what themes do you see that relate to what you’ve learned about Black feminism? What examples support your insights? How and why did Black feminism come to be? What were some of the initial themes and questions posed by Black feminists? Both Kindred and Parable center Black woman characters. What are some of the challenges they face? How do the lead characters in Kindred and Parable navigate the challenges they face? More to come! Quick note: Butler doesn’t consider Kindred a sci-fi novel. Quick Links Page: Week 12 Page: Continue working on WE5 and begin reading Kindred (Week 12) Module: Resources for Writing Experience 5 (Butler’s Kindred and Parable of the Sower) Reading Guide: Kindred Kindred, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Parable of the Sower, by Octavia Butler and adapted by John Jennings and Damian Duffy Short video about accessing these ebooks Contact me Calendar Week 11: Introduction to Octavia Butler, Genre of Comics, and Rhetorical Listening Week 12: Kindred, “Introduction” to “The Fight” (pp. iv—167) and ancillary texts Week 13: Kindred, “The Storm” and “Epilogue” (pp. 168—237) and ancillary texts Week 14: Parable of the Sower, “Introduction” to “2026” (pp. iv—120) and ancillary texts Week 15: Parable of the Sower, “2027” (pp. 121—262) and ancillary texts Week 16: Finish and post WE5

2-3 paragraph on the successful teacher.

2-3 paragraph on the successful teacher.. I’m trying to study for my Psychology course and I need some help to understand this question.

Chapters 21-24 of your textbook The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher (4th ed.).
The successful teacher designs lessons and assessments that support overall student achievement. In 2-3 paragraphs, discuss evidence-based approaches supporting teaching experiences and relate how you can create an effective assignment and assess for student learning.

Please cite some references in the paper using APA

Exemplary
Highly Proficient
Proficient
Approaches Proficient
Does Not Meet Expectations

5 points
4 points
3 point
2 points
0-1 point

Overview and Analysis of Prompt

Thoroughly developed, highly articulate analysis of the prompt.

Astute connections to outside references and resources to support analyses.

Evidence in both columns 3 and 5 present

Overview and analysis of the prompt is adequately developed.

Adequate connections to outside references and resources are provided to support analyses.

Evidence in both columns 1 and 3 present
Overview and analysis of the prompt lacks adequate development.

Connections to references are minimal, missing, or unclear in alignment with the Scholarly Connection prompt.

5 points
4 points
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2 points
0-1 point

Scholarly Reflections and Connections

The roles of scholar, leader, and practitioner (SLP) are skillfully analyzed through multiple lenses demonstrating exceptional understanding of the SLP model.

Exemplary selection and inclusion of evidence-based findings to support reflections/connections.

Evidence in both columns 3 and 5 present
Scholarly reflections and connections are provided highlighting the roles of scholar, leader, and practitioner (SLP) demonstrating a solid understanding of the SLP model.

Quality selection and inclusion of evidence-based findings to support reflections and connections.

Evidence in both columns 1 and 3 present
Scholarly reflections and connections are missing or under-developed.

Inclusion of evidence-based findings to support the reflections and connections are missing or incomplete.

5 points
4 points
3 points
2 points
0-1 point

Written Expression/APA

Writing reflects exceptional skill and is free of errors

Exemplary command of APA formatting within the document and in the Reference page.

Evidence in both columns 3 and 5 present

Written expression is proficient with few or minor errors that do not interfere with overall readability APA formatting is used properly with few or minor errors in text and/or the Reference page.
Evidence in both columns 1 and 3 present
Frequent and/or severe errors in standard written English that interfere with understanding Paper is formatted incorrectly

Most sources are referenced inappropriately

References page does not follow APA style or is missing

2-3 paragraph on the successful teacher.

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