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American InterContinental University Verbania Inc Systems Implementation Plan Report

American InterContinental University Verbania Inc Systems Implementation Plan Report.

There are multiple steps and tasks necessary for this Unit 1 IP assignment, as follows: 

Review the information provided in Part 1 and Part 2 below. 
You must meet with your team to identify the IT disciplines (specializations) that they represent and begin to form your team and plan your project. Note that each member may be viewed as the expert for his or her discipline. 
You will need to research and analyze (on an individual basis) the requirements specified in the section “New Content for Week 1: Planning and System Requirements.” Develop your own individual paper defining the necessary requirements from your perspective. Submit your individual paper to the Unit 1 IP area. Further details can be found in Part 3 below. 
Collaborate with your multidisciplinary team to reach a consensus on the requirements for the Capstone project. Capture the agreed-upon set of requirements in the Capstone project template. The first draft must include “DRAFT” as part of the file name. Submit the first draft to the Group area so that all team members have access and the instructor may view the team’s progress. Refer to Part 2 below for further details. Note, the Capstone project will build and evolve over the upcoming weeks. The final Capstone project will be submitted as a Group Project in Unit 4. 

Capstone Project – Informational
This part of the assignment is NOT FOR GRADING THIS WEEK. This part of the assignment is to contribute to the Capstone project and also to show the instructor that progress is being made on the Capstone project.
Use the template provided in the section below titled “Description of Capstone Project.” Submit your Capstone project-related work to the Group submission area. Include the word “DRAFT” in the document title. Your first draft will then be available to share with your team. The first draft will also be available for your instructor to view the team’s progress. 
You will be developing a comprehensive Systems Implementation Plan as your Capstone project (Unit 4 Group Project) in this course. For the Capstone project, you and your team will be expected to demonstrate project management abilities, communication skills within a multidisciplinary team, problem analysis, and the application of information technology and related best practices toward the creation of a comprehensive and cohesive solution meeting organizational and user requirements. As IT projects typically involve people with diverse IT skill sets and backgrounds, this project should mirror that real-world environment. 
This Capstone project involves numerous IT areas including hardware and software, application development, networking, and security. Your team may be comprised of members who represent one or more of these IT areas. You will create and submit individual documents that propose your individual analysis during the different phases of the project. You will also need to collaborate with your team on a weekly basis to develop an overall solution that the entire team deems appropriate given the identified requirements. Typical project management methodology and skills should be employed. 
Description of Capstone Project
Use the company profile and scenario found here as the subject of your Systems Implementation Plan. 
Capstone Project Activity: Unit 1
The first task for the team is to create the Systems Implementation Plan document shell that includes the sections listed below. As you progress through each project phase, you will add the necessary content to each section of the Capstone project document. Appropriate research and collaboration between team members should be conducted to support the multidisciplinary solution.
Download the template found here for this project. This will serve as the basis for the Capstone project for the course. Throughout the course, you and your team will develop and add content to this template. The team will add different information to this template each week. Like all projects, information will be gathered and added to the final deliverable on a weekly basis. The final deliverable will evolve throughout the course as the team works together on various elements. Submittal to the Group submission area resulting from the team effort will occur in Unit 4.
New Content for Week 1: Planning and System Requirements
For this week’s contribution to the overall Capstone project, the team will specify the following:

The pertinent requirements 
Proposal of the necessary solution elements (related to the IT disciplines) 
Development of a high-level plan for implementing the solution

This first section of the Systems Implementation Plan should answer the following questions:

What specific and detailed requirements are addressed in the solution, and how? 
What does Verbania need from an IT perspective to set up the needed infrastructure? 
What is included in the solution’s hardware and software infrastructure?

Include a high-level network diagram that illustrates the required hardware and software infrastructure on the company’s premise. Explain access from the perspective of employee (internal and external access) and end user (remote access). 
Within the template, prepare 5–7 pages of content describing Planning and System Requirements within Section 1.
Part 3: Individual Project – Submit to the Unit 1 IP Area
Individual Project Submission
This part of the assignment is for grading this week. This assignment is a document describing the requirements based on your own individual views. Your individual work should be submitted to the week’s individual dropbox. 
Research and analyze the stated requirements. What unstated requirements are there, and what method(s) would you use to collect a more comprehensive set of requirements? Develop a Word document that describes all of the requirements and explains how they would be met using hardware, software, networking, and security. In other words, summarize the elements of the solution that are necessary to address the requirements. Support your proposal.
American InterContinental University Verbania Inc Systems Implementation Plan Report

Exploring The Health Benefits Of Tea

Exploring The Health Benefits Of Tea. Japan – the country with the world’s longest life expectancy. Based on Paul Wiseman, journalist from USA TODAY reported that Japanese live longer life compared to everyone else in the world (par. 1). Frank Jordans, journalist of The Huffington Post also states that Japanese girls that are born in the year 2009 have a high chance of living to the year 2095, some may even stand the chance to explore the wonders of the next century (par. 1). Have you ever question the reason why Japanese carries the title of the world’s longest life expectancy? One of the reason is Japanese consume tea, in large quantity. Many countries across the globe believed in the health benefits of drinking tea peculiarly China, Japan, India and even England. Tea, commonly known as the nature’s “wonder drug” should be continuously explored by the general public to increase health awareness (Tea Benefits). The nature’s “wonder drug” – tea, plays an important role in varies countries around the world which includes the formation of cultural ceremonies, trade routes, formal events, entertainment, and leisure for almost 4000 years. Tea is important not just solely due to the taste but also the health benefits that are tied along this ancient drink. Hence, people should include tea into their daily routine and experience the revitalizing benefits of tea (Walker). Tea has numerous health benefits that could be grouped into 5 different categories: overall health care, mental health, internal organ, fitnessExploring The Health Benefits Of Tea

Ethical Dilemma-

order essay cheap Ethical Dilemma-. I’m studying for my Nursing class and need an explanation.

Ethical Dilemma-APN Business Planning-Quality of Care

Describe a situation of ethical dilemma that you have experienced in practice and how it was resolved. (Saunders, 2014)
Submission Instructions:

Your post should be at least 500 words, formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 3 academic sources.

APN Business Planning

Based on your textbook reading, discuss the process of Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) business planning from a system approach.
Submission Instructions:

Your post should be at least 500 words, formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 3 academic sources.

Quality of Care

Explain how to measure and monitor the quality of care delivered and the outcomes achieved by an Advanced Practice Nurse.
Submission Instructions:

Your post should be at least 500 words, formatted and cited in current APA style with support from at least 3 academic sources.

Ethical Dilemma-

Methods for Water Treatment

1.12.2 Effect of chlorination of water Chlorine is toxic not only for microorganisms, but for human being also. For humans, chlorine is an irritation to the nasal passages eye, and respiratory system. Chlorine gas must be cautiously handled because it may cause severe health problem. Although, chlorine gas is also the low rate form of chlorine for water treatment, It makes use choice in spite of the health problem. In drinking water, the concentration of chlorine is usually very low and is thus not a concern in acute exposure. More of a concern is the long term risk of cancer due to chronic exposing to chlorinated water. This is mainly due to the halo alkanes and other products and chlorinated products. These are carcinogenic and have been the substance of concern in chlorinated drinking water. Chlorinated water has been related with increased risk of bladder, colon and rectal cancer. In the case of bladder cancer, the risk may be doubled. Chlorination is a very popular method of water disinfection that has been used from several years. It has proved to be efficient for destroying bacteria and viruses, but not for some carcinogenic disinfection by-product, many communities have become hesitant in the continuation of this process. Although chlorination does have some disadvantages, it continues to be the most conventional, useful, and consistent method of water disinfection. 1.13 Oxidation by potassium permanganate Most treatment plants, uses potassium permanganate for the oxidation and subsequent removal of iron, follow the chemical addition with manganese greensand filtration. Manganese treated greensand can exchange electrons and therefore oxidizes iron and manganese to their insoluble, filterable states [[1]–[2]]. When the filter is completely regenerated the excess KMnO4 will break through the filter bed leaving a pink color in the water. The greensand filter bed is usually capped with anthracite to first remove insoluble compounds, which helps prevent the filter from becoming clogged. Most filters are equipped with an air wash system to enhance the greens and backwashing process. Major disadvantages to the use of the potassium permanganate – greens and filtration process for iron removal include high chemical costs and filter bed deterioration when the pH falls below 7.0. In some treatment plants, KMnO4 is used to oxidize iron and manganese without greensand filtration[[3]]and analytical chemistry [[4]] and also as a disinfectant. Among the six oxidation states of manganese from 2 to 7, permanganate, Mn(VII) is the most pervasive oxidation state in acid, with reduction potentials of [[5]]Oxidation by permanganate finds extensive application in organic synthesis [[6]].The manganese chemistry involved in these multistep redox reactions is an important source of information as the manganese intermediates are relatively easy to identify when they have sufficiently long lifetimes, and oxidation states of the intermediates permit useful conclusions as to the possible reaction mechanisms, including the nature of intermediates. In acidic medium it exists in the different forms: HMnO4, H2MnO 4, HMnO3 and Mn2O7. The thesis comprises seven chapters including the general introduction about chemical kinetics as follows. 1. General Introduction This chapter introduces about the kinetics, mechanisms, disinfection and catalysis of reactions in general. PART I Uncatalyzed reactions 2. Transformation of Levofloxacin during Water treatment with chlorine: Kinetics, Mechanism and Pathways Kinetics and mechanism of removal of fluoroquinolone antibacterial levofloxacin (LFC) by free available chlorine (FAC) during water chlorination processes was investigated for the first time between the pH values 4.2 and 8.5. The pH dependent second order rate constants were found to decrease with increase in pH. (e.g. Apparent second order rate constant; k”app = 20 dm3 mol-1 s-1 at pH 4.2 and k”app = 1 dm3 mol-1 s-1 at pH 8.5 and at 25 oC). The products of the reaction were determined by Liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry. There are two plausible pathways for the LFC chlorination. The major channel is electrophilic halodecarboxylation of quinolone moiety in which, HOCl reacts at tertiary N(4) amine to form a reactive chlorammonium intermediate (R3N(4)Cl ) that can catalytically halogenate LFC and the minor channel is chlorination at piperazinyl moiety in which the HOCl reacts at tertiary N(4) amine to form a reactive chlorammonium intermediate (R3N(4)Cl ) followed by intermediate degradation both at piperazinyl and quinolone moiety with successive chlorination. The effect of temperature on the rate of the reaction was studied at four different temperatures and rate constants were found to increase with increase in temperature and the thermodynamic activation parameters Ea, ΔH#, ΔS# and ΔG# were evaluated for the reaction and discussed. 3. Transformation of linezolid during water treatment with chlorine: A kinetic study The experimental studies on transformation of emerging contaminant linezolid during water chlorination process have been carried out using UV-Visible spectrometer. The pseudo-first order rate constants of linezolid reaction with free available chlorine (FAC) at 5.0 to 8.8 pH have been determined. The second order rate constants are found to decrease with increase in pH (e.g. apparent second rate constant; k”app=2.88 dm3 mol-1s-1 at pH 5.0 and k”app = 0.076 dm3 mol-1 s-1 at pH 8.8 at 298K). Monochlorinated reaction product has been identified by LC/ESI/MS spectra under the experimental conditions. A mechanism involving electrophilic halogenation is proposed based on the kinetic data and LC/ESI/MS spectra. The effect of temperature on the rate of the reaction has been studied at four different temperatures. It is observed that rate constants increase with the increase in temperature and the thermodynamic activation parameters Ea, ΔH#, ΔS# and ΔG# are evaluated for the reaction and discussed. The product of the reaction between linezolid and FAC retains the antibacterial activity. The geometry optimization of the reactants and the products has been done using dispersion corrected density functional (DFT-D) method. All the DFT calculations are accomplished using the TurboMole-5.10 package. 4. Transformation of antibacterial agent lomefloxacin by alkaline permanganate: Kinetics and Mechanism The kinetic and mechanistic investigation of oxidation of emerging contaminant Lomefloxacin (LMF) by alkaline permanganate was carried out spectrophtometrically. The oxidation product 7-amino-1-ethyl-6,8-difluoro-4-oxo-quinoline-3-carboxylic acid was identified by Agilent 6130 Series Quadrupole LC/MS. The stoichiometry was found to be 1:2, that is, 1 mol of lomefloxacin reacted with 2 mol manganese (VII). Orders with respect to [LMF] and [OH–] were found to be fractional and less that one. The oxidation reaction proceeds via an alkali-permanganate species, that forms a complex with lomefloxacin and the complex then decomposes to give the product. The rate of reaction was found to decrease with decrease in the dielectric constant. The effects of initially added products and ionic strength have also been investigated. The kinetics of the reaction was also studied at four different temperatures and the thermodynamic activation parameters for the reaction were evaluated and discussed. The geometry optimization of reactants and activated complex were carried out using density functional theory (DFT). The DFT calculations were accomplished with the TURBOMOLE program package (Version-6.4). The activation energy was found to be ~21 kJ/mol at RI-BP86.def 2-TZVPP level of theory. PART II CATALYSED REACTIONS 5. Silver (I) catalyzed and uncatalyzed oxidation of levofloxacin with aqueous chlorine: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic approach The kinetics and mechanism of the Ag (I) ion catalyzed reaction of levofloxacin (LFC) by free available chlorine (FAC) during water chlorination processes was investigated for the first time between the pH values 4.2 and 8.2. The pH dependent second order rate constants were found to decrease with increase in pH. (e.g. Apparent second order rate constant for Ag (I) catalyzed reaction, k”app = 114.40 dm-3 mol-1 sec-1 at pH 4.2 and k” app. = 8.72 dm-3mol-1 sec-1 at pH 8.2 and at 25±0.2 ℃). The reaction rates revealed that Ag (I) catalyzed reaction was about six-fold faster than the uncatalyzed reaction. The products of the reaction were determined by Liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry. The reaction proceeds via formation of intermediate complex between Ag (I) ion and levofloxacin, then HOCl reacts with the complex to form chlorinated product. The effect of catalyst, effect of initially added product, effect dielectric constant and effect ionic strength on the rate of reaction was also studied. The effect of temperature on the rate of the reaction was studied at four different temperatures and rate constants were found to increase with increase in temperature and the thermodynamic activation parameters Ea, ΔH#, ΔS# and ΔG# were evaluated for the reaction and discussed. 6. Ag (I) catalyzed chlorination of linezolid during water treatment: Kinetics, mechanism The kinetics and mechanism of the Ag (I) ion catalyzed reaction of linezolid (LNZ) by free available chlorine (FAC) during water chlorination processes was investigated for the first time between the pH values 4.0 and 9.0. The pseudo-first order rate constants of linezolid reaction with free available chlorine (FAC) at 4.0 to 9.0 pH have been determined. The pH dependent second order rate constants were found to decrease with increase in pH. Apparent second order rate constant for uncatalyzed reaction, e.g. k”app = 8.15 dm-3 mol-1 sec-1 at pH 4.0 and k” app. = 0.076 dm-3mol-1 sec-1 at pH 9.0 and at 25±0.2 ℃ and for Ag (I) catalyzed reaction total apparent second order rate constant, e.g. k”app = 51.50 dm-3 mol-1 sec-1 at pH 4.0 and k” app. = 1.03 dm-3mol-1 sec-1 at pH 9.0 and at 25±0.2 ℃. The reaction rates revealed that Ag (I) catalyzed reaction was about five to ten-fold faster than the uncatalyzed reaction. Monochlorinated reaction product has been identified by LC/ESI/MS spectra under the experimental conditions. A mechanism involving electrophilic halogenation is proposed based on the kinetic data and LC/ESI/MS spectra. The reaction rates revealed that Ag (I) catalyzed reaction was about ten-fold faster than the uncatalyzed reaction.The reaction proceeds via formation of intermediate complex between Ag (I) ion and linezolid, then HOCl reacts with the complex to form chlorinated product. The effect of temperature on the rate of the reaction has been studied at four different temperatures. It is observed that rate constants increase with the increase in temperature and the thermodynamic activation parameters Ea, ΔH#, ΔS# and ΔG# are evaluated for the reaction and discussed. The effect of catalyst, effect of initially added product, effect dielectric constant and effect ionic strength on the rate of reaction. The product of the reaction between linezolid and FAC retains the antibacterial activity. 7. Transformation of linezolid during water treatment with permanganate: Kinetics, mechanism and Pd (II) catalysis The uncatalyzed and Pd (II) catalyzed transformation of Linezolid (LNZ) with permanganate in acidic medium was carried out between the pH values 3.0 and 6.0. The pH dependent second order rate constants were found to decrease with increase in pH. Apparent second order rate constant for uncatalyzed reaction, e.g. k”app = 6.32 dm-3 mol-1 sec-1 at pH 3.0 and k” app. = 2.64 dm-3mol-1 sec-1 at pH 6.0 and at 25±0.2 ℃ and for Pd (II) catalyzed reaction total apparent second order rate constant, e.g. k”app = 75.5 dm-3 mol-1 sec-1 at pH 3.0 and k” app. = 45.66 dm-3mol-1 sec-1 at pH 6.0 and at 25±0.2 ℃. The reaction rates revealed that Pd (II) catalyzed reaction was about ten-fold faster than the uncatalyzed reaction. The products of the reaction were determined by Liquid chromatography and high resolution mass spectrometry. The reaction proceeds via formation of complex between Pd (II) and linezolid, then complex reacts with acidic permanganate to form intermediate compound, which then form oxidized products. The effect of catalyst, effect of initially added product, effect dielectric constant and effect ionic strength on the rate of reaction were also studied. The effect of temperature on the rate of the reaction was studied at four different temperatures and rate constants were found to increase with increase in temperature and the thermodynamic activation parameters Ea, ΔH#, ΔS# and ΔG# were evaluated for the reaction and discussed. References [1]. w. Stumm, and J.J. Morgan, Aquatic Chemistry. Wiley Interscience, New York, 1967. [2]. J. Hoigne, H. Bader, W.R. Haag and J. Staehelin, “Rate Constants of Reactions of Ozone with Organic and Inorganic Compounds in water – III”, Water Res., Vol. 19(8), 1985, pp.993. [3]. L.D. Benefield, J.F. Judkins and B.L. Weand , “Iron and Manganese Removal”, from Process Chemistry for water and wastewater Treatment, ed. J.M. Chege, Prentice – Hall, Inc., Englewood CliffS, N.J.,1982. [4]. G.A. Hiremath, P.L.Timmanagoudar and S. T. Nandibewoor, Kinetics of oxidation of thallium (I) by permanganate in aqueous hydrochloric acid medium using stopped flow technique. Transit. Met. Chem. Vol.21, 1996, pp. 560–568. [5]. M.C. Day and J.Selbin, Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry, Reinhold, New York, 1964, pp. 226–233. [6]. P. Caron, R.W. Dugger, J.A.Ruggeri and D.H.Brown Ripin, Large scale oxidations in the pharmaceutical industry. Chem. Rev. Vol.106, 2006, pp. 2943–2989.

Theme of the Poem Harlem Essay (Book Review)

Langston Hughes is considered a very prominent author during the Harlem Renaissance and his works guided the African Americans from a state of hopelessness to having hope concerning their ultimate liberation from oppression. At the start of the Civil Rights Movement, in 1951, he authored a poem called “Harlem” depicting the theme of frustration, particularly what happens to dreams when they are put on hold. This is explicitly stated in the first line of the poem, “What happens to a dream deferred?” (Shmoop University, 7). He then effectively stirs up the idea of a “dream getting deferred” in his reaction in the poem. The title of the poem, “Harlem,” which is the center of activities of the African Americans in the U.S., seems to suggest that the writer intended to invoke a particular image of a particular group of people whose dreams are often deferred. “The dream” is a something that the writer of the poem had in mind for the African Americans, especially during the Civil Rights Era when frustration characterized the mood of the African Americans. Hughes wanted the African Americans to succeed in their pursuit for complete liberation. He sought after their rise in power above the white people; thus, he did not mince his words in making his opinion, especially because he was regarded to be the poet laureate of the African Americans in all places. The United States was widely regarded to be the land of opportunity where no dreams could get deferred; however, the sentiment of the African Americans during this period was not expressing this (Meyer). After the Civil war in the eighteenth century, the African Americans were set free from slavery other oppressive practices. In addition, various federal laws had given them the opportunity to vote, own property, and enjoy other rights in the United States. Nonetheless, ongoing discrimination against the African Americans, together with the regulations enacted since the Civil War, resulted in their hopelessness and dreams being deferred. Consequently, the African Americans were regarded as second-class citizens, for example, they had to attend inadequately equipped institutions of learning, opt for menial jobs, use different public facilities from the whites, and had restricted access to other facilities and areas. By the 1950s, the African American’s frustration with inferior status in the American society was intolerable and Hughes comprehended well what the future held for them. He indicates this in the last line of the poem, “Or does it explode?” ((Shmoop University, 7), which alludes to the fact that they can only be held down for sometime before they revolt or “explode” to force their liberation. Get your 100% original paper on any topic done in as little as 3 hours Learn More Besides depicting the frustration of the African Americans in the mid-twentieth century, the poem also strikes a universal chord since many people throughout the ages have had their dreams postponed, which have made them to feel frustrated. Some individuals do nothing and allow their aspirations to “dry up” while others allow their dreams to “fester like a sore,”; that is, aggravate them for a lifetime because they have not been accomplished (Koyesha, para.2). The sixth line, “Does it stink like rotten meat?”, also invokes the aggravation obtained from deferred dreams. Nonetheless, amidst this frustration, some people still cling on their aspirations, “Or crust and sugar over—like a syrupy sweet?”, hopping for their accomplishment. Works Cited Koyesha, Hamilton. “Analysis’ of Four Poems by Hughes, Dunn, Olds, and Haskins.” Karenrager.tripod.com. Karenzo Media, 2002. Web. Meyer, Michael. The Bedford Compact Introduction to Literature, 7th ed. New York: Bedford / St. Martin’s Press, 2006. Print. Shmoop University. Langston Hughes: Shmoop Biography. Sunnyvale, CA: Shmoop University Press, 2010. Print.

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