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A Customer-Centric Approach to Innovation college admission essay help houston tx English essay help

Dell had long been an Intel-only shop. Landing Dell as a customer was the culmination of a four-year effort that AMD had codenamed Project MAID. Sunnyvale, California-based AMD designed and manufactured microprocessors for the computing, communications, and consumer electronics markets. With roughly 10,000 employees, the semiconductor company had 2005 revenues of $5. 8 billion, a 17% increase over 2004. The 2003 launch of Opteron and the company’s AMD64 technology ushered in a new chapter in AMD’s history.

Traditionally, AMD had been a distant follower to Intel, which had a dominant position in microprocessors for the server and personal computer (PC) markets. However, Intel’s dominance was eroding as Opteron gained acceptance and AMD focused on “customer-centric innovation” under Ruiz, who was appointed CEO in 2002. Driven by Opteron’s success, AMD’s unit share in servers for the second quarter of 2006 rose to 26%, up from 11% in Q2 of 2005. 1 The top four computer-makers that sold the vast majority of servers—Hewlett-Packard (HP), Sun Microsystems (Sun), IBM, and Dell—now offered at least one Opteron-based server.

Furthermore, AMD’s presence in the lucrative corporate segment was growing: 90% of the top 100 Forbes Global 2000 were using AMD64 technology by the end of 2005. 2 And, AMD reported higher margins than Intel in the first quarter of 2006. AMD also felt it had built enough credibility to lead the industry in new directions. The company had recently launched a marketing initiative called the “Power Campaign” to focus the industry on the importance of energy efficiency and systems designed to maximize performance at the minimum power consumption.

Accordingly, AMD was leading an effort to use “performance-per-watt”—in which it held an advantage—as the best benchmark to compare competing microprocessors. Yet, Ruiz saw challenges that could pose a threat to sustainable growth for AMD. Intel’s dominant market position could limit AMD’s ability to make inroads into key market segments beyond servers, such as corporate desktops and notebooks. Furthermore, Intel had just announced its “roadmap to recovery” that included a new line of microprocessors that balanced performance, power consumption, and cost.

perating system had to be compatible with the microprocessor and affected how well the processor performed its tasks. A Second Source for Intel

In 1981, IBM transformed the personal computer industry when it launched the IBM PC with the Intel 8088, a 16-bit processor conforming to Intel’s newly developed x86 microprocessor architecture. Hoping to achieve rapid penetration, IBM adopted an open standard to encourage software developers to design applications for the IBM PC. As the market exploded, IBM required Intel to license its patents to other chip suppliers to ensure a reliable supply of microprocessors and to spur price competition and innovation.

In 1982, AMD became a licensed second-source for Intel’s x86 family of processors, originally named because the earliest processors—excluding the 8088—had model numbers ending in “86. ” AMD later manufactured Intel’s 80286 (286) in 1986, but relations grew strained as the two companies disagreed over the cross-licensing agreement. AMD pursued arbitration in 1987 to gain access to Intel’s design for its next-generation processor the 80386 (386), a 32-bit processor. In 1992, the arbitrator awarded AMD more than $10 million in compensation and a permanent, royalty-free license to the 386.

AMD released the Am386 in 1991 and Am486 in 1993, low-priced clones of Intel’s 386 and 80486 (486) processors. In 1995, the two companies reached an agreement that recognized AMD’s rights to Intel’s microcode—the software code inside the processor—for the 386 and 486. However, AMD agreed it would not use Intel’s microcode beyond the 486 processor. Furthermore, AMD was prohibited from using Intel’s next-generation technology for connecting the CPU to the computer’s memory and other components, and the companies’ product development paths diverged. The “K” Series

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Description With specific reference to “three daughters of China” memoir, what can “scar literature” tell us about the Cultural Revolution?

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